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New postgraduate courses announced

grad school bags cropped smaller

Image © Ana Escobar

We’ve been making some very exciting changes to our postgraduate offer lately, so below we’ve rounded up all our new and revised postgraduate courses in one place.

New courses //

Starting in September 2015, we are offering a range of fantastic new courses in order to meet demand and expand applicants’ options in a number of fast-evolving and developing creative industries.

We hope that there will now also be even more opportunity for undergraduate-to-postgraduate progression.

Our new postgraduate courses, subject to validation, are:

MA Animation: Students create, explore and play with both 3D digital and 2.5D analogue technologies. This course offers the chance to develop a personal practice that understands animation in multiple forms, creating innovative approaches to animation driven by critical understanding.

MA Design Management and Cultures: Students develop high-level leadership, management, communication and analytical skills for a career in the creative and cultural industries. The course combines academic study with creative and professional practice in a project-led curriculum.

MA Film (2016 entry onwards): Information available shortly

MA Games Design: Rooted in experimental practice, MA Games Design ensures that students are equipped with both the technical and critical skills that allow them to produce a broad portfolio of innovative game prototypes. Concepts of goal, challenge and obstacle are also explored through critical evaluation.

MA International Journalism (Online): A new course developed to help journalists get an international perspective on the world and the way in which global media is now accessible across traditional frontiers thanks to rapidly-evolving communications technology.

MA Television: This unique course delivers the skills needed to design and make fact-based television programming. Students learn how to translate their ideas into practical, hands-on advanced programming and also learn about pitching, budgeting, and how to establish their own production company.

Postgraduate Diploma Photography: Information available shortly

Updated courses //

Some of our other postgraduate courses have been significantly revalidated and are now offering updated content.

MA Arts and Lifestyle Journalism (revalidated MA Journalism): Students develop the advanced skills needed for a successful career in journalism, create substantial pieces of journalism on aspects of arts, culture and lifestyle, and learn from tutors with extensive professional experience of arts journalism in print, broadcast and online.

MA Graphic and Media Design (revalidated MA Graphic Design): Students establish a distinct understanding of the fields of graphic design and visual culture, as well as those that infect, destabilise and unravel it. This course invites thoughtful, critical, productive individuals interested in the effective articulation of design.

Changes //

We’re also ensuring that all our Masters programmes (MAs) start in September. Courses which currently have January starts will have one final January intake in 2015, then standardised September starts will begin in September 2015.

All full-time MA courses will also move to a four-term model, with part-time MAs using a seven-term model.

We hope you enjoy exploring our new postgraduate possibilities!

View all postgraduate courses

Read more about the changes

Visit the LCC Graduate School pages

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UAL ranks in overall top 30 in UK’s latest higher education research audit

University of the Arts London ranks among the top research universities with 83% of its research graded as world leading and internationally excellent, following the Research Excellence Framework 2014 (REF 2014).

UAL is placed by REF 2014 in the overall top 30 UK research institutions for the quality of research submitted. It is a top 5 research university in its broader peer group and first in the Power ranking in the Art and Design: History, Practice and Theory category.

Analysis by Times Higher Education shows that UAL enjoys 15.22% market share of all art and design research in the UK, by far the largest share of any institution.

Nigel Carrington, Vice-Chancellor of UAL, said:

“UAL is known as a centre of excellence in practice-based teaching. I am delighted that we are now also recognised as a leading research university. We are making important contributions to global research on creative practice, sustainability, fashion, curation and the history of art and design.”

UAL has the largest community of designer and artist researchers in the world, and is a dynamic location for contemporary art historical research.

This is the most influential UK-wide benchmark for research. The results will be used by the four UK higher education funding bodies to allocate research funding to universities – around £2 billion per year from 2015-16.

Notes
1. REF 2014 provides a robust and thorough assessment of the quality of universities’ research in all disciplines. The research of 52,061 academic staff from 154 UK universities was peer-reviewed by a series of panels comprising UK and international experts, and external users of research.
2. REF 2014 was undertaken by the four higher education funding bodies for England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. It replaces the Research Assessment Exercise (RAE), last conducted in 2008. The results are available at www.ref.ac.uk
3. REF 2014 was a process of expert review. HEIs were invited to make submissions in 36 units of assessment. Submissions were assessed by an expert sub-panel for each unit of assessment, working under the guidance of four main panels. Sub-panels applied a set of generic assessment criteria and level definitions, to produce an overall quality profile for each submission.
4. The overall quality profile awarded to each submission is derived from three elements:
a. The quality of research outputs. This contributes 65 per cent of the overall quality profile. The panels reviewed 191,150 submitted research outputs.
b. The social, economic and cultural impact of research. This contributes 20 per cent of the overall quality profile. This is a new feature in the assessment framework. The panels reviewed 6,975 submitted impact case studies.
c. The research environment. This contributes 15 per cent of the overall quality profile.
5. UAL places 26th out of all UK higher education institutions who submitted to REF 2014 in all subjects.
6. 83% of UAL’s research was assessed as world-leading (31%) and internationally excellent (52%).
7. Of all UK higher education institutions in unit of assessment 34 (Art & Design: History, Practice and Theory), UAL is 1st in the Power ranking.
8. UAL is 5th of all higher education institutions from peer group D who submitted research in unit of assessment 34: Art & Design.
9. UAL’s research case studies can be found at http://www.arts.ac.uk/research/research-impact/

 

 

Nigel Carrington praises UAL’s research community following REF 2014

After years of hard work, we now know that UAL has achieved an outstanding result in the Research Excellence Framework 2014. You can read our public statement on the UAL news pages.

83% of the research we submitted was graded as world-leading and internationally excellent. This places UAL in the overall top 30 UK research institutions in the UK for the quality of research submitted.

To put this in context, REF 2014 is the most influential and far-reaching UK-wide benchmark for research. The results will be used by the four UK higher education funding bodies to allocate research funding to universities – around £2 billion per year from 2015-16. So this result should have a big influence on our fortunes over the next six years.

As I have said more publicly, UAL is known as a centre of excellence in practice-based teaching. I am delighted that we are now also recognised as a leading research university against international benchmarks.

I want to pay tribute and thanks to the leadership of Professor Oriana Baddeley, UAL’s Dean of Research, and to the huge efforts of the entire research community at UAL. We are making important contributions to global research. It is right that this is recognised.

Nigel Carrington
Vice-Chancellor, UAL

LCC alumna reveals lives of hospice patients in new exhibition

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Jade Sempare, 31, was diagnosed with MS at the age of 13. She told Eléonore about how her house keys represented living independently from her mum.

MA Photojournalism and Documentary Photography alumna Eléonore de Bonneval has recently been working with patients at St. Joseph’s Hospice, Mare Street, Hackney, to create a series of intimate portraits capturing the most important objects in their lives.

Launched to coincide with Hospice Care Week, Eléonore’s ‘Everlasting Lives’ exhibition features photographs of objects selected not for their materialistic value but for the personal and emotional stories attached.

St Joseph’s Hospice is one of the oldest and largest hospices in Britain, founded in 1905. It is an independent charity providing compassionate support and care for people with life-limiting conditions and terminal illnesses in Hackney and the City of London, Newham and Tower Hamlets.

Speaking at the exhibition opening, Eléonore said:

“I want to thank St Joseph’s Hospice staff and patients for their support and trust throughout this project.

“Jade, Sanjay, Lucie, John, Josie, Susan and Viviane told me about their life stories, we identified together five objects that mattered to them, but really those objects don’t matter.

“What do matter are the stories attached. Through those you’ll get a window into their lives, hear about their trips, favourite books or music and most importantly you’ll hear about the essential role played by their beloved friends and family.”

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John Waterhouse’s photograph of his dad

John Waterhouse, 77
Diagnosed with blood cancer in January 2013

My dad
I was born the wrong time, 1937. I didn’t see my father. I don’t remember seeing my father until I was 8 years of age. It wasn’t a normal upbringing because my mother was in the hospital. She had TB. She died at 32. I was 9.

I was about 8 years of age when my dad came back, he was like a stranger because I had not seen him at all really. I remember he came in, he gave us a little jar of sweets and went round the pub. I still remember that day. I don’t know what sweets it was in those days, everything was rationed.

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Toys belonging to Susan Murray’s children

Susan Murray, 52
Diagnosed with MS on January 18, 2008

‘Eric the Sheep’ and ‘Stripey Zebra’, my children’s teddy bears.
I had my first kid Alfy, now 15, when I was 38 and Jake, now 12, when I was 40. The only thing I didn’t do is travel to South America, which is the next place I wanted to go to. But I had the kids instead.

My life has completely changed since I had the kids. It does. They are really important to me.

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Perfume bottle belonging to Viviane Fatimani’s grandmother

Viviane Fatimani, 29
Diagnosed with MS in December 2009

The scent of my French grandmother
My grandmother died last year at Christmas, two days before we came to visit but I think it was on purpose because she always made me promise I would be at her funeral. When I was living in Mexico, sometimes she said ‘you will come back for my funeral right?’ ‘Yeah of course I will Mémé !’.

I have kept her perfume because it smells of her. It is Cinema by Yves Saint Laurent. I can’t believe she used to bath herself in this stuff. I used to think that it was just what she used to smell of. I didn’t realize it was perfume. My aunt told me ‘you should take the perfume’.

I took it to my sister and I said: ‘Close your eyes, smell this, what is it ? What does it smell of?’ She said, ‘it smells of Mémé!’

‘Everlasting Lives’ continues at St Joseph’s Hospice until Friday 16 January 2015 and is open every day 9am-6pm.

Read more about MA Photojournalism and Documentary Photography

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Review // David Goldblatt and Anthony Clavane turn spotlight on football’s big issues

Flickr image

David Goldblatt, award-winning author of The Game Of Our Lives.

Second-year BA (Hons) Sports Journalism student Stephen Kilbey, winner of the 2014 Sir William Lyons Award for best young motoring journalist, reports on the latest in LCC’s popular series of sports guest lectures.

Award-winning authors David Goldblatt and Anthony Clavane recently tackled the good, the bad and the downright ugly sides of the ‘beautiful game’ as guests of LCC’s BA (Hons) Sports Journalism course.

Goldblatt’s latest book, The Game Of Our Lives, has been widely acclaimed as a seminal look behind the money-fuelled hype surrounding English football at its elite level.

Clavane, who is also a Sports Journalism tutor at LCC, is the author of Promised Land, about his emotional ties to his home city Leeds and its football club, which was named as both Football and Sports Book of the Year in 2011.

He also writes on football for, amongst others, the Mirror, Independent and New Statesman and is an authority on the Jewish influence on the English game.

On their agenda at LCC were hot topics including club ownership, recent incidents of racism within the sport, and the growing popularity of the women’s game.

“I think with the rise of women’s football, we should see a new type of following,” said Goldblatt. “I don’t know quite what it is yet, but I certainly think it will be better to see something other than a clone of the Premier League.

“Will it ever be as big as men’s football to truly rival it? I’m not sure… Women’s football still has a long way to go, but it’s certainly the most prominent it’s been for the public since its boom during the early 20th century.”

BA (Hons) Sports Journalism Course Leader Anne Coddington said after writing her 1997 book One Of The Lads: Women Who Follow Football, she expected to have seen more progress by now in terms of female fandom, roles within clubs and in the sports media.

Clavane illustrated the progress made in dealing with racism in football with anecdotes from his time supporting Leeds United while growing up, when it was still widespread among fans.

“It was hard,” he explained. “I actually gave up my fandom for a couple of years because it got too much for me.

“When there’s several thousand fans chanting the same obscene things at black players, your fellow supporters, sometimes people you’d call friends… The only way I found I could deal with it was to get up and leave.”

The session ended with some thought-provoking questions from the students, who left motivated and eager to continue the discussion.

Words by BA (Hons) Sports Journalism student Stephen Kilbey

Read more about BA (Hons) Sports Journalism

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