As UAL’s summer shows season begins, we share some of the highlights from this year’s Foundation Diploma in Art and Design graduating class.

Marlen Rau
Marlen Rau, Central Saint Martins

“In everyday life most objects we interact with go unnoticed, they serve their purpose and only get attention when faulty or broken. The aim of my project was to provoke reflection upon this relationship by confronting the user with a design inspired by the human body and human mannerisms. The Introvert Lamp is based on the posture of people who try to rest and shelter themselves from the environment by laying their heads down onto folded arms. When switched off, the fragile bulb is supposed to be pivoted down and to rest in a bespoke made depression within thick, protective concrete walls.”

Hannah Bottino
Hannah Bottino, Camberwell, Chelsea and Wimbledon

“For my final major project I was really captivated by plant life within the city. I wanted other people to feel the same way about urban greenery as I did. My goal at the end of the project was for the work to get people to look at urban greenery in a lovelier light. A book lent itself best to a subtle narrative of falling in love with urban greenery.”

Marlee King, Lewis Bush

Marlee King, London College of Communication

“Bowie’s Alphabet is a little homage to one of my biggest inspirations – Mr David Bowie. His love for influencing others through music is what made me direct my attention to him for my project. I adore the way he shifted so easily through his characters, and it fascinates me to watch clips of him perform and totally be immersed with who he is on stage. The screen prints you see are an eclectic mix of various characters I particularly love, such as Ziggy Stardust to the right, and the Thin White Duke with Jareth the Goblin King left. I wanted to assemble the prints as if they were part of a fanatic’s bedroom wall inspired by my own childhood room. The alphabet itself is illustrated through sound, with each letter found phonetically in his music. Put on the headphones and be transported to the mind and room of a Bowie fan!”

Thomas Fung

Thomas Fung, Camberwell, Chelsea and Wimbledon

“The idea of the work is based on the exploration of cross-dimensions,  I started my research through taking some photos in Oxford Circus, after that I deconstructed the photos into 2D drawing forms. After that, I make it as a sculpture in such form. For the strings I described it as the lights and the traffics in Oxford Circus. Finally the Light I applied is to make relationships between the exhibition site and my piece.”

Anne Elmhort

Anne Elmholt, Central Saint Martins

“I was inspired by the way, in which the main character, Alex, of A Clockwork Orange, befriends his reader; I’ve designed an immersive experience, where the audience move through a world coloured by Alex’s romanticised version of violence. Alex and his friends will coerce the audience to join them for a night of horrors. While being confronted with the hooligans’ lack of moral, the audience might find themselves in situations where their own morals are challenged.”

Linnet Van Veen photo by Lewis  Bush

Linnet Van Veen, London College of Communication

“The title of my show is ‘The Unspoken Truth’. I took inspiration from aboriginal art from the oceanic reign. Aboriginal art is consisted of abstract symbols, dots and lines. I decided to adapt this to the modern world, specifically social media sites. I explored the internet and social media sites for symbols that represented our fixation with it, as well as its influence on us. I took the symbols and turned them into patterns. I took the patterns and screen printed them over one another using vibrant colours.”

Ming Sau Wu
Ming Sau Wu, Camberwell, Chelsea and Wimbledon

“I have noticed that the surroundings actually are not like what we usually think they supposed to be. I have experimented with micro-lens to take photographs of my pet, I was shocked when I saw the detailed texture of her hair. I realised there are many interesting things in our life we would never notice because of their scale. I am also inspired by the films, Microcosmos and The Powers of Ten, as it changed the angle how we look at the world. Everything would change if the tiny objects become massive, and it makes me changed the attitude toward things. So I want to deliver this message visually to make people see the world in a different way.”

Babachuwe Tabase photo by Lewis Bush

Babachuwe Tabase, London College of Communication

“For my final piece called ‘Something out of nothing’ I considered sketching out my old walking frame as artwork that means a lot to me personally. My walking frame was a significant part of my life and artistic practice. I remember clinging portfolios on to my frame whilst I was struggling to walk and becoming an art project in motion. Hanging large bits of work on the handle bars to tying work on the back of my frame and completely utilising the space that was given to me. I had used it for eight long years and because of the intensive course I got rid of it. During my foundation I became stronger and more confident physically, mentally and emotionally to be able to live out my dream. I initially began by documenting my most memorable achievement with a large scale mixed media sketch, I reconsidered how a response any form of disability in general needs to be more discreet and subtle.

The outcome was four large A0 prints of an abstract and figurative interpretation of my walking frame. My work in itself is a celebration of how far I have come as an individual and an art student. By using O’s, U’s, the backs of I’s and exclamation marks I managed to create an abstract image of my Kaye walker. I planned to make it more figurative in the style of Tom Ekerlesley by using letterpress. I stopped looking at actual shapes of the Kaye walker and instead found myself concentrating on the negative and positive space. The medium of letterpress has more of a professional finish and it shows the smudges and detail of wrapped object. This is what I wanted my final piece to have because it shows how a wrapped object can be translated into figurative artwork.”

Nicolas Canal Tinius
Nicolas Canal, Central Saint Martins

“I started out by looking at the boundary between our consciousness and the physical world, comparing it to the boundary between our virtual lives and our physical lives. That developed into an exploration of the analogue and the digital, where I focused my interest in our recent tendency to over document our own lives. More specifically, I was interested in the amount of information that we hoard in the form of photographs and text, and how hesitant we are to delete anything. With that in mind, my project developed into an exploration of various interruptions to that seemingly inevitable thought process, which ended up taking shape as hole punched film. The most interesting, and unexpected thing that happened with that was the interaction between people in the photographs and the holes which ended up looking like voids in space.”

Fredrik Tjærandsen
Fredrik Tjærandsen, Central Saint Martins

“My garment is based on an obsession with seeing the Minions in everyday objects. I photographed my associations and from that I have been working on extracting information – putting it on the body and at the same time considering movement. I decided to work with playful materials in order to truly catch the Minion essence.”

Watch a video on the Minions project.

Samantha Ridgway
Samantha Ridgway, Camberwell, Chelsea and Wimbledon

“In my photography, I seek to capture the unfound beauty in the world.  Aftermath is a phenomenon I have adopted to represent my search of this unfound beauty. It is a term deriving originally from agriculture referring to the grass that grows again after the harvest. In previous projects I have captured the beauty of new life in devastation, desolation and death. This time, I decided to pursue darkness.  For my final project I wanted to roam the city at night when no one was around, when everything was still. I wanted to capture the feeling of isolation and darkness in a city that is so rich and alive showing that through darkness comes light, out of darkness comes beauty.  Life is made up of many difficult dark times but through those times, you grow stronger and more beautiful than ever before. There will always be happiness, there will always be light, but you are always in control of it. You are surrounded by beauty yet you do not see it. Close both eyes, open the mind. Only then will you feel it. Only then will you see it.”

Tamara Ibrahim photo by Lewis Bush

Tamara Ibrahim, London College of Communication

“The aim of the project was to convey the delivery of the lines in the film through typography, colour and screen prints. The idea for using only two colours came from when I created the first quote being “I know this because Tyler knows this” as my aim was to show the dual personality of the narrator. As I started taking note of quotes to use I found that the less I thought about it, the clearer the designs would be. To contribute to the simplicity of the designs, I thought it best to keep the colours to a minimum as the series of prints would look cluttered. I chose to challenge myself throughout this project as I usually go into plenty of detail in my final outcomes, however by sticking to using Helvetica I was able to play with layout and how the placement of text on a page has an effect on the viewer.”

Jessie  Heung

Jessie  Heung, Camberwell, Chelsea and Wimbledon

“I was first inspired by Cornelia Parker, Mona Hatoum and Wenda Gu, which they both created a starling atmosphere with lighting and shades surrounding in a space. Then, I created an installation of the reflection of shadow made by hair in a semi- abstract scale. The designs were influenced by the line composition of the construction buildings, which I discovered that outer beauty attracts, but inner beauty captivates. I do not view things the way men do but to investigate the unseen side of the beauty through darkness.”

Find all the information on this year’s summer degree shows on the dedicated site summershows.arts.ac.uk

Follow the shows on social media and share your favourite works with the hashtag #UALsummershows

Join the tweet out as the first of the BA summer shows open – on Tuesday 26 May at 11am share “See you at the #UALsummershows summershows.arts.ac.uk