Archive for the ‘Audience’ category

UAL at the Venice Biennale 2015

The 120th Venice Biennale will open this weekend with Great Britain represented by UAL alumna Sarah Lucas, alongside works by UAL Chairs Isaac Julien, Sonia Boyce, and Lucy Orta, as well as UAL PhD student, Samson Kambalu, course leader Tania Kovats, and alumni Charles Lim and Tsang Kin-Wah.

L-R: Isaac Julien, Samson Kambalu, Lucy Orta and Sonia Boyce.

Left to right: UAL’s Isaac Julien, Samson Kambalu, Lucy Orta and Sonia Boyce.

“How can the current disquiet of our time be properly grasped, made comprehensible, examined, and articulated?” This is the question that Okwui Enwezor, curator of the 56th International Art Exhibition, poses in his introduction to this year’s Venice Biennale. Taking the title All the World’s Futures, the politically-charged exhibition proposes “a project devoted to a fresh appraisal of the relationship of art and artists to the current state of things.”

Invited by Okwui to participate in All the World’s Futures, UAL Chair Sonia Boyce will present Exquisite Cacophony, a filmed, live, improvised vocal-led performance featuring performers Astronautalis and Elaine Mitchener, at Padiglione Centrale, Giardini di Castello. Filming for the piece took place at the V&A, supported by UAL.

Lucy and Jorge Orta Glasstress Amazonia

Exhibiting in Glasstress 2015 Gotika, a collateral exhibition at the Palazzo Franchetti, Academia, UAL Chair Lucy Orta will present a new large format sculpture in bronze and glass. Combing historical works from the Hermitage collection with commissioned works with a Gothic theme from contemporary artists, the exhibition “explores how medieval ideas and communication methods have imperceptibly crept into our modern conscience despite our technological advances and how the Gothic concept influences contemporary art”. Lucy + Jorge Orta’s commissioned sculpture Arboreal, is an “imposing bronze cast from a fallen tree-trunk from which, four exquisite glass seed pods are blossoming. The contrast between the dark patina of the bronze and the ethereal quality of the delicate hand-blown Murano glass, speak of the resilience of nature to overcome the most barren environments”.

In response to the 1974 la Biennale di Venezia, in which part of the programs were dedicated to Chile to in a gesture of solidarity, the All the World’s Futures will introduce the ARENA, “an active space dedicated to continuous live programming across disciplines”. The epicentre of the ARENA will be an epic live reading of Karl Marx’s Das Kapital. Okwui explains: “here, Das Kapital will serve as a kind of Oratorio that will be continuously read live, throughout the exhibition’s seven months’ duration. The ARENA will serve as a gathering-place of the spoken word, the art of the song, recitals, film projections, and a forum for public discussions. Taking the concept of the Sikh event, the Akhand Path (a recitation of the Sikh holy book read continuously over several days by a relay of readers), Das Kapital will be read as a dramatic text by trained actors”, directed by artist and filmmaker, and UAL Chair Isaac Julien.

Samson Kambalu, Runner, film still, 2014

Spotted by Okwui in Johannesberg, Camberwell, Chelsea and Wimbledon PhD student Samson Kambalu will present three projects for the Biennale: a live performance that attempts to re-stage Michelangelo’s The Last Judgment, a film installation, and a second installation based on his research at Yale. He spoke to the Chelsea, Camberwell and Wimbledon blog ahead of the Biennale, revealing that appearing at the Biennale for the first time feels “otherworldly”.

Former Olympic sailor, artist and Central Saint Martins graduate Charles Lim Yi Yong is representing Singapore, with a body of work titled Sea State. The ongoing work explores “notions of borders, histories and everyday life, and how these may be generated through our perceptions of the sea.”

Charles Lim SEA STATE 2 as evil disappears 2014 Sajahat Buoy

The Infinite Nothing, a text and light installation from Tsang Kin-Wah, represents Hong Kong at the Biennale. A graduate of  Camberwell MA Book Arts, Tsang’s work for the Hong Kong pavilion is his largest and most complex to date.

Tsang Kin-Wah, The Infinite Nothing

Appearing at the Biennale for the second year, Azerbaijan presents Vita Vitale, an exhibition which looks to Azerbaijan’s future, and beyond its geographic borders, to spotlight the artists and scientists confronting the ecological challenges we face globally, including Wimbledon MA Drawing course leader Tania Kovats.

Tania Kovats, Arctic Circle Islands, 2014

“I am a feminist, and it is a feminine show” asserts Sarah Lucas in The Guardian this week, discussing I Scream Daddio, her solo exhibition representing Great Britain. The London College of Communication alumna presents a show of sculpture and paintings depicting her “muses” against the backdrop of the British Pavilion entirely repainted in buttercup yellow paint. “The sculptures are set in a sea of custard,” Lucas tells The Guardian “Crème Anglais in other words.”
Sarah Lucas, I SCREAM DADDIO, Installation View, British Pavilion 2015, Photo by Cristiano Corte copyright British Council

The Venice Biennale runs 9 May to 22 November.

Read more about the Venice Biennale

Read the full interview with Samson Kambalu

Read more about the UAL Chairs

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Tara McDowell – Pure Information: Conceptual Art at the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design

Image: John Baldessari, I Will Not Make Any More Boring Art, the Mezzanine Gallery, Nova Scotia College of Art and Design, 1-10 April 1971

Image: John Baldessari, I Will Not Make Any More Boring Art, the Mezzanine Gallery, Nova Scotia College of Art and Design, 1-10 April 1971. Courtesy NSCAD University, Gallery Archives, Mezzanine fonds.

Talk by Tara McDowell

‘Pure Information: Conceptual Art at the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design’

Tuesday 26 May, 2-4pm,

Central Saint Martins, Room D113

In 1970, the coastal Canadian city of Halifax became an unexpected hotbed of conceptual art when a small art school, the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design, threw its doors open to a number of young artists who had decided that the idea mattered more than the object. Conceptual art often took the form of instructions, so it became an ideal vehicle for experimental education. Vito Acconci, Dan Graham, Lee Lozano, Yvonne Rainer, Simone Forti, Sol LeWitt, James Lee Byers, Lucy Lippard, Robert Barry, and many others retreated to Halifax for a time, and some especially influential conceptual artworks were made there. This lecture considers the Petri dish of Halifax circa 1970, and maps the everyday terrain that structured one of the most radical moments in the history of art. Rather than an aesthetics of administration or a politics of publicity, rather than artmaking as purely dematerialized, mechanized, or philosophized, imagine conceptual art circa 1970 as a site of draft dodging, game theory experiments, acid dropping, relational psychodramas, divisions and alliances, power plays, boredom, loneliness, and isolation at the end of the world. And all this at an art school.

Tara McDowell’s paper begins with a close reading of John Baldessari’s ‘I Will Not Make Any More Boring Art’ (1-10 April 1971), which was an exhibition at the Mezzanine Gallery, a small space founded in response to David Askevold’s Projects Class, an extraordinary experiment in conceptual art as pedagogy. Overall, her research has been into NSCAD as an expanded social site of making and showing, in some ways anticipating current hybrid research projects and spaces, albeit in a looser, less programmatic way. The Mezzanine is of interest less for any one exhibition that took place there – although shows such as Lee Lozano’s ‘Infofiction’ (27 January-13 February 1971) and Vito Acconci’s ‘Accessibilities’ (1-15 December 1970) perhaps stand out - and more for its relation to other forms of practice occurring simultaneously, with visual art, performance, teaching, printmaking and the NSCAD press all testing and nurturing each other.

Tara McDowell is Associate Professor and Director of Curatorial Practice at Monash University in Melbourne, Australia. She is Editor-at-Large of The Exhibitionist, a journal on curatorial practice and exhibition making for which she served as Founding Senior Editor, now published and distributed by The MIT Press. She holds a Ph.D. in the History of Art from the University of California, Berkeley and has held curatorial appointments at the CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts in San Francisco, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, and the Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art.

Anyone interested in attending this event from outside CSM should email Lucy Steeds directly for further details: l.steeds@csm.arts.ac.uk

Graduate Shortlisted for Creative Enterprise Award

Resignified by FruitionsElla Quiogue, a 2014 graduate from our MA Applied Imagination course, was recently shortlisted in the design category of the Deutsche Bank Awards for Creative Enterprise.

This prestigious award has been helping creative entrepreneurs turn their ideas into reality for over 20 years.

Ella was shortlisted for her social enterprise Fruitions Creative Collaborations, which is based in the Philippines. Fusions aims to form a creative collaboration between the Philippines’ indigenous artisan communities and established contemporary designers across disciplines including illustration, graphic design and jewellery design.

It is a design-led initiative that helps indigenous artisan traditions thrive, while also providing a new way for established designers to create.

ArtisanConventional handcrafted products from indigenous artisan communities are re-imagined by contemporary designers. These re-imagined designs are then made by the artisans, who use their traditional tools and crafts to create premium products.

The first project, called Resignified, is an eight-piece homeware collection. Consisting of weavings and woodwares, it features reworkings of the traditional patterns and iconography of the Ifugao tribe of Benguet, Philippines.

Ella has developed Fruitions with a team of creative industry professionals, strategic advisors, and a growing network of talented designers. Her enterprise developed from her research project as a student on MA Applied Imagination in the Creative Industries. She hopes the project will generate economic and social benefits for indigenous communities of the Philippines.

More information:
- Applied Imagination in the Creative Industries

Rob Kesseler Speaks at Puerto de Ideas, Chile

RK Convergent Territories

Rob Kesseler, BA Ceramic Design Lecturer and UAL Chair of Art, Design and Science, was recently invited to participate in the second annual Puerto de Ideas in Antofagasta, Chile.

Rob delivered a keynote lecture titled Conversion Territories, and showcased an exhibition at Minera Escondita, which included photographs, drawings and specimens collected in Chile during the weeks prior to the festival.

Collecting and documenting are a core part of his work, and exhibiting this local collection enabled him to open up and help people understand his process. With the support of the British Council, he led a popular series of creative workshops for young people, drawing specimens selected for the group.

Sponsored by the mining company Minera Escondida, the festival of science and culture brings together scientists, artists and humanists from all over the world to speak, showcase work and lead workshops. Over 10,000 people attended the three-day festival. Speakers included Nobel Prize winner, Ada Yonath and Gilles Boeuf, President of the Natural History Museum, Paris.

After the festival Rob explored connections in the Chile, visiting the young design studio GT2P in Santiago, the stunning Centro de Arte Curaummilla – a ceramic workshop and artistic residency, and the Natural History Museum in Valparaiso, where his exhibition will be shown next.

Rob Kesseler will be speaking next Thursday, 7 May as part of the UAL Chairs Present Series.

More information:

Victorian Futures: Culture, Democracy and the State on the Road to Olympicopolis

On 14 and 15 May 2015, Chelsea College of Arts is hosting the conference Victorian Futures: Culture, Democracy and the State on the Road to Olympicopolis, in collaboration with Middlesex University and the Victoria and Albert Museum. We asked Professor Malcolm Quinn, UAL Associate Dean of Research and Director of the Camberwell, Chelsea and Wimbledon Graduate School, to tell us what the conference will involve and why it is relevant today.

Taking place a week after the UK General Election,Victorian Futures will focus on how the agenda for state-sponsored access to the arts in Britain has developed since the Reform Act of 1832 and the Victorian Era. We will use history to think about the future, and show how calls for greater public access to the arts in the 1830s led to the democratic visions of the Great Exhibition and Albertopolis in 1851, which were reprised in the Festival of Britain in 1951 and are now re-envisioned in plans for the ‘Olympicopolis’ site in London. I spoke to a selection of our high-profile speakers who will be appearing at the conference to discuss how the cultural movement of Victorian era continues to influence our society.

Victoria and Albert Museum Director Martin Roth said:

“The success of the ‘Albertopolis’ complex of Victorian cultural institutions in South Kensington, of which the V&A is one, continues to illustrate the strength of Victorian policies on cultural democracy and the importance of state support for the arts. But as we develop a new vision for ‘Olympicopolis’ in east London, we must not only look at Victorian achievements but also at the goals they did not reach. Henry Cole believed, for example, that international exhibitions should promote international peace and intercultural understanding, or in his words, ‘stop nations going to blows as hastily and foolishly as they are wont to do’. Are we any closer to achieving this difficult goal today? I hope that this conference will give us the opportunity to read Victorian history not as a comfort, but as a challenge.”

Crystal_Palace

Interior painting of The Great Exhibition, Crystal Palace, London

Lucy Kimbell, AHRC Design Research Fellow, Policy Lab and principal research fellow at the University of Brighton, says that Victorian Futures will show us how: “The history that is shaping our collective future in the UK includes both the visible, aesthetic and material but also the processual and infrastructural.” Kimbell also argues that the conference will help us to address an important question: “What comes with our Victorian educational, political and cultural institutions and how do they enable particular kinds of learning and participation and exclude others? The analytical task is to work out what we need to keep and what to change or adapt.”

Kieran Long, Senior Curator of Contemporary Architecture, Design and Digital V&A, one of two keynote speakers on the first day of the conference, said:

Victorian Futures is vital for us right now, at a time when the whole notion of the public realm is at stake and under pressure, to think again about the lessons our Victorian forebears can teach us about education and civic pride in the context of the complexity of the digitally enabled 21st century.”

Our other keynote speaker on day one of Victorian Futures is Charles Saumarez Smith, Secretary and Chief Executive of the Royal Academy of Arts, who sees the conference as a chance to engage with some vital issues for public culture and the arts that have remained unresolved over the past hundred and eighty years. Saumarez Smith said:

“It’s interesting to look back on the decade of the 1830s, immediately following the Great Reform Bill, and to see how many of the questions asked then in parliament were the same questions which need to be asked today: how can public money be used to enhance the arts? what is the role of government? and what is the role of museums?”

However Graeme Evans, Professor of Urban Cultures and Design at Middlesex University, who is a member of the closing panel of Victorian Futures which examines the route from Albertopolis to Olympicopolis and beyond, says that history offers a cautionary lesson: “If history teaches us anything, cultural democracy should be a right; futuristic masterplans and grand place-making on the other hand (as recent history shows) is anything but democratic – or cultural.”

The event promises to answer and discuss many of the questions raised above, with lively debates and the chance to meet and network with organisations such as the Royal Academy, V&A and the London Legacy Development Corporation (LLDC), who are responsible for delivering the ‘Olympicopolis’ project. A two-day student pass is available for £36 and can be booked through the UAL website. We’ll also be tweeting at @VFutures. We hope you’ll be able to join us.

Student Selected for Hong Kong Residency

Exhibition view of Excessive Enthusiasm: Ha Bik Chuen and the Archive as Practice, Asia Art Archive, Hong Kong, 2015. Courtesy of Asia Art Archive.

Exhibition view of Excessive Enthusiasm: Ha Bik Chuen and the Archive as Practice, Asia Art Archive, Hong Kong, 2015. Courtesy of Asia Art Archive.

Central Saint Martins has teamed up with Asia Art Archive, creating a new exhibition studies research residency in Hong Kong.

Asia Art Archive is a non-profit organisation that documents and makes accessible art from the region.

Alec Steadman, a student on our MRes Art: Exhibition Studies course, has been chosen through open competition as the first research fellow. He will travel to Hong Kong in July 2015.

Diverse artistic practices
Alec’s work looks at the diverse models of self-organisation currently being practiced and developed by artists in Asia, with a particular focus on the south-east Asian archipelago. As part of his residency, he will give a talk about this project.

Alec will be provided with flights, accommodation, a per diem and a modest honorarium.

More information:
MRes Art: Exhibition Studies

Unannounced Acts of Publicness to Appear in Granary Square

UnAnnounced Acts

On ten unspecified days in May, ten separate artworks will appear unannounced in Granary Square.

If you’re on your way to work, eating lunch, playing in the fountains or simply having a break from the office you might encounter them. At the end of each day, the artwork will disappear without trace. Unannounced Acts of Publicness is intended to question the meaning of ‘public’ in privately owned public spaces.

The commissioned artists are from Central Saint Martins and beyond, including recent graduates and internationally renowned practitioners. For each work one person who lives or works in the area, will be invited to witness an act and make a written response.

Unannounced Acts of Publicness has been negotiated on an agreement of trust between Central Saint Martins and the landlord Argent. Only the project curators know when and what the acts will be. The programme will be announced retrospectively on 1 June. It will then be discussed publicly at the Restless Futures conference at Central Saint Martins on 11 June.

If you think you’ve witnessed any ‘Unannounced Acts of Publicness’, do let us know what you think on Twitter using #unannouncedacts. We look forward to hearing from you.

Image credit: ‘Girl’ Clara Metter 2014

More information:

Textile Students Win Framework-Knitter Bursaries

One of Kasia's textile pieces.

One of Kasia’s textile pieces.

Two BA Textile Design students from Central Saint Martins have been awarded prestigious bursaries by the Worshipful Company of Framework-knitters.

Oliver Thomas Lipp and Kasia Franczak, both third-year knit students, were selected for their outstanding textile design work.

This is the first time that the Worshipful Company of Framework-knitters has chosen two students from the same course.

One of Oliver's textile pieces.
One of Kasia's textile pieces.

Hand-beading and surrealism
Oliver received the David Bethel Bursary for his hand-beaded pieces, knitted using specialist yarn on a domestic knitting machine.

Kasia was given the Carr Doughty Bursary. She captured the board’s attention with her colourful collection, which combines surreal film inspiration with material innovation.

The bursaries are worth £2,500 and will help Oliver and Kasia develop their Degree Show collections.

More information:
BA Textile Design

Holding it Together: Art Magazines, Then and Now

A reading of five issues of Studio International magazine by Jo Melvin (2015). Film still. Camera by Oliver Beatty

A reading of five issues of Studio International magazine by Jo Melvin (2015). Film still. Camera by Oliver Beatty

Holding it Together: Art Magazines, Then and Now

Artist Pages, Policies and Criticism

Panel discussion with Jennifer Higgie, Jason Farago and Jo Melvin (Reader in Fine Art Theory at Chelsea College of Arts), convened by Antony Hudek and Alex Sainsbury

Saturday 25 April, 3-5pm  

Jennifer Higgie (writer and co-editor of Frieze) and Jason Farago (writer and founding editor of the new art magazine Even) join Jo Melvin (curator of Five Issues of Studio International, Raven Row) to discuss some of the motivations, exasperations and ambitions behind art magazines from the 1960s to the present day, broaching such questions as: What conditions compel a magazine to get started and thrive? How do magazines create and serve networks of writers and artists? What does an editor do that a writer and curator cannot?

Presented by Raven Row at Whitechapel Gallery, to coincide with the exhibition Five Issues of Studio International at Raven Row, until 3 May.

Please click here to reserve your place via the Whitechapel Gallery website.

Tickets £8.50 full price, £6.50 concession

Whitechapel Gallery
Zilkha Auditorium
77-82 Whitechapel High Street
London, E1 7QX

Earth Day – sustainable food inspiration

earthday2015
22 April marks the 45th anniversary of Earth Day. Observed in 192 countries worldwide, more than 1 billion people participate in Earth Day activities each year, making it the largest civic observance in the world. Sustainability is a core focus at UAL, from our curriculum and canteens to our buildings, including Wimbledon’s new BREEAM rated studios. To celebrate Earth Day 2015 we’re sharing three of our favourite organic recipes from our Soil Association Gold Award-winning cafes.

Carrot soup photo George Grinsted Creative Commons https://www.flickr.com/photos/imgeorge/

Organic Spiced Carrot Soup with Ginger & Sweet Potato
Serves 4-6
• 1.1 litres mild vegetable stock or water
• 5 thin slices of ginger
• 1 tablespoon oil
• 1 medium organic onion, thinly sliced
• 2 large garlic cloves, minced
• 1 teaspoon ground cumin
• 1 teaspoon ground coriander seed
• 1 tablespoon grated fresh ginger
• Cayenne or chilli powder to taste
• about 900g organic carrot, scrubbed well and thinly sliced
• 1 medium organic sweet potato, peeled and thinly sliced
• 150ml fresh orange juice
• Crème fraiche
• Fresh chopped coriander to garnish

Heat the vegetable stock or water in a pan with the ginger slices, and keep warm on the hob. Heat the oil in a large pot over medium heat and add the onion and a pinch of salt. Sauté for 5 minutes, then add the garlic, cumin, coriander, ginger and a few pinches of cayenne powder. Reduce the heat to low and cook until the onion is very soft, about 10 minutes more. Add the carrots, potato, and 900ml of the stock or water. Bring to the boil, then reduce the heat, cover and simmer until the carrots are very tender, around 15-20 minutes. Puree the soup in a blender or food processor until smooth. Return to the pot, add the orange juice, and thin with the remaining stock to the desired consistency. Season to taste with salt and pepper and more cayenne if desired. Serve with a dollop of crème fraiche, and a sprinkling of fresh coriander leaves.

meatballs photo by J. Annie Wang Creative Commons https://www.flickr.com/photos/j0annie/

Organic Meatballs in Napolitana sauce
Serves 2-3
• 500 g lean grass fed beef (minced)
• 125 g ricotta cheese, drained (use deli style ricotta which is firmer)
• 200g baby spinach (cooked in a little olive oil and lemon, liquid drained)
• ½ cup fresh chopped parsley
• 1 organic / free range egg
• pinch of nutmeg
• sea salt and pepper to taste
• 4 cups Napolitana fresh tomato sauce

Combine beef, ricotta, spinach, ½ cup parsley, egg, nutmeg, salt and pepper. Shape into large balls and coat in a little olive oil, then place in a deep tray lined with grease-proof paper. Do not place too closely together, making sure there is enough room around the meatballs. Bake the meatballs for 10 minutes, then add the Napolitana sauce to fill half way up the pan. Bake for a further 20 minutes until the sauce is bubbling. Serve sprinkled with fresh chopped parsley, a little grated parmesan and green vegetable spaghetti.

Panna Cotta photo Ana Paola creative commons  https://www.flickr.com/photos/99006711@N04/

Organic Vanilla Panna Cotta
Serves 4
For the panna cotta
• 3 gelatine leaves
• 250ml/9fl oz of organic milk
• 250ml/9fl oz of organic double cream
• 1 vanilla pod, split lengthways, seeds scraped out
• 25g/1oz organic sugar
For the sauce
• 175g/6oz organic sugar
• 175ml/6fl oz water
• splash cherry liqueur
• 350g/12oz of organic raspberries
To serve
• 4 sprigs fresh organic mint
• icing sugar, to dust

For the panna cotta, soak the gelatine leaves in a little cold water until soft. Place the milk, cream, vanilla pod and seeds and sugar into a pan and bring to a simmer. Remove the vanilla pod and discard. Squeeze the water out of the gelatine leaves, then add them to the pan and take off the heat. Stir until the gelatine has dissolved. Divide the mixture into four ramekin dishes and leave to cool. Place into the fridge for at least one hour, until set. For the sauce, place the sugar, water and cherry liqueur into a pan and bring to the boil. Reduce the heat and simmer until the sugar has dissolved. Take the pan off the heat and add half the raspberries. Using a hand blender, blend the sauce until smooth. Pass the sauce through a sieve into a bowl and stir in the remaining fruit. To serve, turn each panna cotta out onto a serving plate. Spoon over the sauce and garnish with a sprig of mint. Dust with icing sugar.

soil-association-slogan

Find out more about UAL’s sustainable food policy

Read more about Earth Day 2015

See how the first Earth Day was reported in the New York Times, April 1970

Discover more about sustainability at UAL