Archive for the ‘Audience’ category

BA (Hons) Magazine Publishing graduate nominated in PPA New Talent Awards

Ben Landscape

BA (Hons) Magazine Publishing graduate Ben Lifton

LCC alumnus Ben Lifton, who graduated from BA (Hons) Magazine Publishing last year, has secured a nomination in the prestigious PPA New Talent Awards 2015, which celebrate the next generation in magazine and business media.

Ben is currently a publishing assistant at London-based content marketing agency The River Group, where he works on lifestyle magazines healthy and Healthy For Men, sold in Holland & Barrett and GNC shops around the UK.

Healthy magazine was also launched onto newsstands in December 2014 and is now available in supermarkets, Marks & Spencers, WHSmith and 5,000 independent newsagents. Ben manages healthy’s subscriptions and helps the brand gain market share, researching future opportunities.

He has recently arranged partnerships with innovative companies to help drive the magazine brands in new directions, increasing sales and providing a better user experience for the customer.

Regarding his nomination, Ben said: “With the publishing industry constantly changing, it is an exciting time to be working with magazines. It is great to have been nominated, and for my work with River to have been recognised.”

Ben’s nomination is in the Best Graduate/Intern category. Speaking about Ben and a shortlisted colleague, beauty writer Daisie Smith, CEO of The River Group Nicola Murphy said:

“We are immensely proud that two of our brightest stars have been nominated for what are highly competitive awards. They both display boundless enthusiasm to learn and are a pleasure to work with, and we are now looking forward to the awards ceremony in March.”

The ceremony will take place on Tuesday 10 March 2015 at The Brewery, London.

The best of luck to Ben from LCC!

Read more about BA (Hons) Magazine Publishing

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London Fashion Week AW15

London Fashion Week AW'15  London College of Fashion MA catwalk  designs by Kelly Cho, Maria Piankov and  Yutong Jiang

More than half of the 78 labels showing at London Fashion Week are UAL alumni, including Jackie Lee who takes the prestigious opening slot with her label J JS Lee kicking off the catwalk schedule on Friday morning.

The four-day fashion fiesta returns to the capital this month, with 20-24 February dedicated to the autumn winter collections coming out of London’s cutting-edge ateliers.

Stealing a march on the official schedule, London College of Fashion host their MA Fashion catwalk show at the Wallace Collection on Thursday evening. Watch the show via the live stream from 7.30pm  and catch LCF’s two fashion exhibitions on show across the weekend at Victoria House and the Fashion Space Gallery.

Speaking ahead of the show London College of Fashion head Professor Frances Corner comments: “By separating our MA catwalks it allows us to profile the Womenswear course at a time when the fashion industry’s eyes are on London. The standalone show gives LCF an excellent opportunity to showcase the wealth of exciting, creative and commercially savvy talent that our Graduate school produces.”

To honour the memory of the late Professor Louise Wilson OBE, the largest reunion of Central Saint Martins fashion graduates are gathering on Friday for a special memorial event and the day will close with the Central Saint Martins MA show featuring the collections of the last of her graduates.

Ones to watch this season include Marques’Almeida, Ryan Lo, Faustine Steinmetz and Molly Goddard, recipients of the starmaking NEWGEN sponsorship.

See the full London Fashion Week AW15 schedule

Read Jackie Lee of J JS Lee’s exclusive UAL Edit interview

Find out more about Fashion Photography Next at the Fashion Space Gallery

Find out more about the MA15 exhibition from London College of Fashion

Donate to the Louise Wilson MA Fashion Fund

Read an archive interview with Professor Louise Wilson OBE

 

LCC Associate Lecturer for BA (Hons) Sound Arts and Design at Tate Britain

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Iris talks to visitors at Tate Britain

Iris Garrelfs, a PhD student and Associate Lecturer on LCC’s BA (Hons) Sound Arts and Design course, recently held a week-long project at Tate Britain in which she used visitors’ personal objects and stories to create a sound installation.

Part of a Radio City residency at the gallery, ‘Listening Room’ encouraged adults and children to bring along objects and stories around the theme of hearing and listening from 2-6 February 2015.

Iris recorded the stories from Monday to Wednesday, edited the audio recordings on Thursday and created a sound installation for four channels and objects for everyone’s listening pleasure on the Friday.

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Some of the objects contributed by the public

The conversations between Iris and gallery visitors often expanded into very personal areas, focusing on childhood experiences or caring for relatives, while others were responses to exploring the sonic environment of the Tate.

Iris explains: “I was struck by the generosity of everyone, as people contributed so freely even very personal experiences.

“What came out of it for me was a kind of democratisation that happened through the stories – artists next to children, local residents next to Italian tourists. But there was also a blurring between museum visitors and myself: as I had invited people into the Listening Room, I also became a listener.”

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Exploring the objects used in ‘Listening Room’

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Listening to the installation at Tate Britain

A stereo version of the recording used in the installation was broadcast on Resonance FM and is archived here.

Read more about ‘Listening Room’ on Iris’s website

Read more about BA (Hons) Sound Arts and Design

 

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Faith and Fashion on the school run

Faith and Fashion school run

Panel discussion with Professor Reina Lewis of London College of Fashion, Claire Drucquer, a religious studies teacher and Patrick Moriarty, the Headteacher of JCoSS.

Context of the event

The premise that school uniforms encourage good behaviour among school students is unquestioned by many in the UK today. However what happens when dress codes ‘mission creep’?

Increasingly dress codes are being used to regulate the behaviour of teachers and parents as well as students in faith schools. In non-faith schools, local community norms can produce a de-facto dress code, policed by student peer groups in the playground and parents on the pavement.

About the speakers

To discuss what constitutes today’s school wardrobe, Professor Reina Lewis of London College of Fashion brings her Faith and Fashion series to JW3 to ask teachers, parents, and students if and how what they wear can cross the school gate.

To consider the nuance of school wear, Reina is joined by a panel including Claire Drucquer, a religious studies teacher who, as schools coordinator for Three Faiths Forum, works with people of all faiths and beliefs to build new intercommunal relationships, and Patrick Moriarty, the Headteacher of JCoSS, the UK’s first pluralist Jewish Secondary School who, himself training for ordination as an Anglican priest, has a keen interest in interfaith dialogue.

Event details:

Thursday 12th March 2015
18.30 – 19.30 - followed by a reception
JW3, 341-351 Finchley Road, London, NW3 6ET Please note that this event is not at our usual venue.

RSVP essential 

Find via Googlemaps
UNDERGROUND:Finchley Road (Metropolitan, Jubilee) and West Hampstead (Jubilee)
OVERGROUND:Finchley Road & Frognal and West Hampstead
BUSES: 13, 82, 113, 187 and 268

Further information:

UAL’s en>route launches 2015 BAME mentoring scheme

bame

UAL’s Race Champion Stephen Reid and the Diversity Team launched the 2015 en>route cross-cultural mentoring scheme earlier this month. The scheme, which has successfully run for the previous two years, is one of a number of initiatives to support academic and professional services staff from black, Asian and minority ethnic backgrounds (BAME) to navigate careers in arts higher education.

The event provided a chance for this year’s participants to network with mentees and mentors from previous years. Those who had participated in the en>route scheme in the past shared stories of the support and trust their mentoring relationships had offered.

All agreed that the benefit and learning opportunities were mutual. Past mentees also appreciated having a scheme solely for BAME staff. One mentee commented:

“On a development scheme with only other BAME staff you feel more comfortable and supported discussing sensitive issues of race, identity and personal development. You feel safe.”

Another said:

“My mentor helped me to recognise my abilities and how I might pursue my ambitions to become a new researcher. I was also given tips on problem solving and looking at how I might improve my current position.”

The 2015 cohort of BAME mentees will be matched from a pool of 20 senior staff (both white and BAME staff), including deans, managers, research academics, departmental directors, heads, senior lecturers, and a Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Stephen Reid).

Information on en›route’s other initiatives is available on the intranet.

Global Careers China Event – calling all UAL students

UAL Chinese Alumni Association and the UAL China Society present:  A Global Careers China Event at London College of Fashion

Alumni Event

Tuesday 24 February
from 6.00pm
RHS East, London College of Fashion, John Princes Street, London W1G 0BJ

Calling all University of the Arts London students and graduates…

  • Have you ever considered an overseas career in one of the world’s biggest countries?
  • Want to tap into a creative community of UAL graduates offering support, advice and connections?
  • Are you returning home to China after graduation and want to know more about the creative environment you will be working in?

Featuring a panel of international professionals, we are hosting this unique event that will explore the types of experiences and insight typical of creative opportunities throughout China’s major cities.

Oliver Pearce, the President of the UAL China alumni association, will be speaking about his experiences of working in China, as well as how the current alumni community already established across China will be on hand to offer support and professional connections.

Hearing from UAL alumni with experience in the Chinese market as well as creative representatives from a number of focusses, this will be your chance to explore careers and advice relevant to China, without even leaving London.

This event will be part of a series of international insight chapters, so book now to gain priority for future events and to avoid disappointment. Keep an eye out for confirmed speakers and profiles over the next couple of weeks and click on the link below to reserve your place today!

Register now

Staging Disorder // Beate Geissler, Geissler/Sann

Geissler Sann by Lewis Bush

From ‘Personal Kill’, Geissler/Sann, photographed by Lewis Bush.

LCC’s current showcase exhibition Staging Disorder runs until Thursday 12 March 2015, and features work by high-profile photographers and sound artists responding to ideas of modern conflict and the ‘real’.

We asked Beate Geissler of exhibiting duo Geissler/Sann to tell us more about the pair’s project ‘Personal Kill’.

Tell us a bit about the work you’re showing as part of Staging Disorder.

‘Personal Kill’ depicts interiors of so-called MOUT sites – training installations for Military Operations on Urban Terrain, used to teach close-range combat. The work references a book entitled ‘On Killing’ by Lt. Col. Dave Grossman.

He writes, “In Vietnam the term ‘personal kill’ was used to distinguish the act of killing a specific individual with a direct-fire weapon and being absolutely sure of having done it oneself. The vast majority of personal kills and the resultant trauma occur at this range.”

The resulting trauma of a ‘personal kill’ is more severe than, for example, witnessing comrades or even family getting killed, since it is within the self that we find the source of the horror and not in the other. Something nobody can train an individual for.

Geissler Sann on right by Lewis Bush

‘Personal Kill’ by Geissler/Sann in Staging Disorder at LCC. Photographed by Lewis Bush.

What drew you to tackle the subject of staged conflict?

We were very interested in the simulating qualities of those training sites, their relation to reality and virtuality. The gamification and zombiefication that takes place, which is extending, bending and creating reality, was the focus of our research. It is a feeling like walking in a movie.

When we entered those tunnel systems, it felt like descending into the collective unconscious of western society. These are sites where soldiers are trained to pull the trigger on their opposite.

Friedrich Hegel describes the transition from natural being to social and cultural subject as a violent and traumatic one. He coined the term ‘night of the world’, which he defined as an irreducible dimension of the finitude of subjectivity.

It is the abyss of negativity, the night of the eye, glimpsed in the uncanny gaze of the Other. This is a form of imagination which is the radical negativity of arbitrary freedom.

What are you currently working on outside the College?

We just published a new book ‘Volatile Smile’, which investigates the impact of technology on systems of global commerce. We were interested in the mutual impact of real and cybernetic architecture, with Chicago as its archetype.

What made Chicago a centre of speculative culture — a culture which so rapidly emerged as the ‘non-place’ where cybernetic logic bears its strangest and perhaps most powerful fruits?

What do you think is the effect of holding an exhibition like this at LCC?

Maybe students get inspired, start to raise more questions and become aware that this culture of fear which was created in the last decades is something we need to change.

What advice would you give to current LCC students?

Don’t do shiny art for glossy people.

Beate Geissler is Associate Professor and Area Coordinator Photography, University of Illinois at Chicago.

Visit the Geissler/Sann website

Read more about Staging Disorder

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Staging Disorder // Beate Geissler, Geissler/Sann

Geissler Sann by Lewis Bush

From ‘Personal Kill’, Geissler/Sann, photographed by Lewis Bush.

LCC’s current showcase exhibition Staging Disorder runs until Thursday 12 March 2015, and features work by high-profile photographers and sound artists responding to ideas of modern conflict and the ‘real’.

We asked Beate Geissler of exhibiting duo Geissler/Sann to tell us more about the pair’s project ‘Personal Kill’.

Tell us a bit about the work you’re showing as part of Staging Disorder.

‘Personal Kill’ depicts interiors of so-called MOUT sites – training installations for Military Operations on Urban Terrain, used to teach close-range combat. The work references a book entitled ‘On Killing’ by Lt. Col. Dave Grossman.

He writes, “In Vietnam the term ‘personal kill’ was used to distinguish the act of killing a specific individual with a direct-fire weapon and being absolutely sure of having done it oneself. The vast majority of personal kills and the resultant trauma occur at this range.”

The resulting trauma of a ‘personal kill’ is more severe than, for example, witnessing comrades or even family getting killed, since it is within the self that we find the source of the horror and not in the other. Something nobody can train an individual for.

Geissler Sann on right by Lewis Bush

‘Personal Kill’ by Geissler/Sann in Staging Disorder at LCC. Photographed by Lewis Bush.

What drew you to tackle the subject of staged conflict?

We were very interested in the simulating qualities of those training sites, their relation to reality and virtuality. The gamification and zombiefication that takes place, which is extending, bending and creating reality, was the focus of our research. It is a feeling like walking in a movie.

When we entered those tunnel systems, it felt like descending into the collective unconscious of western society. These are sites where soldiers are trained to pull the trigger on their opposite.

Friedrich Hegel describes the transition from natural being to social and cultural subject as a violent and traumatic one. He coined the term ‘night of the world’, which he defined as an irreducible dimension of the finitude of subjectivity.

It is the abyss of negativity, the night of the eye, glimpsed in the uncanny gaze of the Other. This is a form of imagination which is the radical negativity of arbitrary freedom.

What are you currently working on outside the College?

We just published a new book ‘Volatile Smile’, which investigates the impact of technology on systems of global commerce. We were interested in the mutual impact of real and cybernetic architecture, with Chicago as its archetype.

What made Chicago a centre of speculative culture — a culture which so rapidly emerged as the ‘non-place’ where cybernetic logic bears its strangest and perhaps most powerful fruits?

What do you think is the effect of holding an exhibition like this at LCC?

Maybe students get inspired, start to raise more questions and become aware that this culture of fear which was created in the last decades is something we need to change.

What advice would you give to current LCC students?

Don’t do shiny art for glossy people.

Beate Geissler is Associate Professor and Area Coordinator Photography, University of Illinois at Chicago.

Visit the Geissler/Sann website

Read more about Staging Disorder

The post Staging Disorder // Beate Geissler, Geissler/Sann appeared first on London College of Communication Blog.

Two Halves // Viv Albertine and William Raban

Two Halves Viv William

Two Halves is a regular feature spotlighting two people connected by London College of Communication.

Our aim is to showcase the conceptual intentions, deeper thinking and personal insights that come with the creative process.

If you would like to nominate someone for Two Halves, please email Natalie Reiss (n.reiss@lcc.arts.ac.uk).

VIV ALBERTINE

“Apparently mature students always try and over-achieve, we know this may be our last chance.”

  • Last year I slept a lot, rehearsed my band and played lots of gigs.  The year before that I finished my book and was the lead in a feature film. Every year is different for me and amongst all that I bring up my daughter, which is very improvisational and creative.
  • I write prose every day, not sure what it’s going to turn into. I make notes for songs, I’ve done some drawings but mostly I travel Britain and Europe promoting my book with readings at literary festivals. I want to communicate to as many people as possible, it took three years to write and I am proud of it.
  • I went to LCC 1984-87 and I did BA (Hons) Film. It took me a few years to get a portfolio together after being the guitarist in the Slits. I was a mature student and working, teaching aerobics at the same time. As I’d been in the music industry for seven years, I found the essay writing part of the course very difficult at first, but by the second year I was ok and became a bit of a swot.  Apparently mature students always try and over-achieve, we know this may be our last chance. I was grateful to be there.
  • I am a great believer in exposing myself to other disciplines, different to the one I’m working in, it’s much more inspiring and your work is less derivative.
  • I found collaboration in film very difficult because it watered down the idea.  It was very difficult to keep it strong and stay close to your vision, each department diffused the initial idea, misinterpreted it or there wasn’t the money.
  • If you make work that is honest and faithful to yourself, it will never date. It is scary and painful to do and it may not be recognised as good work for many years but you have to choose if you want to be an artist or an entertainer.
  • I was embarrassingly honest and I had a nervous breakdown after I handed (my memoir) to the publisher.  I had no hopes for it at all. I thought I would be a pariah once people read it. That’s how you should always feel when you make work in my opinion. Like you’ve gone too far.
  • I’ve only done four things, three albums and a book (I could count the way I used to dress in the seventies as it was groundbreaking, political and creative) and they have all transcended who I am.
  • I’m a great believer in the ‘fallow field’, lying dormant until an idea becomes so compelling that you can’t keep it in anymore.  That’s my way of working.  I’d rather do a couple of good things in my life than churn out a load of mediocre work. I’m not a careerist.
  • We had no TV, no books, no social life and no telephone when I was growing up – all I could do was draw.  I was often bored so both drawing and fantasising were my escape and they stood me in good stead.  I never run out of ideas, but sometimes, I concentrate on other things like love.

Viv Albertine’s memoir is Clothes, Clothes, Clothes, Music, Music, Music, Boys, Boys, Boys.

https://twitter.com/Viv_Albertine

http://vivalbertine.com/

 

WILLIAM RABAN

“Dream space is crucially important to any creative process.”

  • I am William Raban, Professor of Film at LCC and most of my time is committed to research both in terms of making films, supervising research students and doing all I can to develop an active college-based research community.
  • I have just finished a 60-minute film (72-82) on the first ten years of Acme Studios that includes pioneering installation and performance works shown at the Acme Gallery (1976–1981).
  • Acme Studios commissioned the film and they approached me because I had been a part of their history in the 1970s and I had documented on film some of the installations and performances shown in the Acme Gallery.
  • When I made Thames Film (1986) I began by being inspired by TS Eliot’s Four Quartets and his view of the river as a ‘strong brown god’.  Later, I discovered the Brueghel painting Triumph of Death in the Prado, which became the means for holding the film together.  It came to me in a dream where I saw the painting to the slowed down sound of Bach’s Matthew’s Passion, which is featured on the soundtrack. And of course, 72-82 is largely informed by artists who worked in painting, sculpture, installation and performance art.
  • The way I started making films in the early 70s invariably was a solitary process but I now depend upon help with specialist areas such as editing and sound.  I have collaborated with David Cunningham for the last 18 years on my soundtracks and he is brilliant to work with.  He is often quite critical of my ideas and I like that degree of resistance in the collaborative process.
  • The films about London and the River Thames have all been inspired either by being out on the river in a small boat or by walking the streets of London and just observing what goes on.  I find life on the streets so fascinating that I am not really interested in the artifice of a film studio.
  • LCC constantly surprises me. I have been here since 1996 but today I discovered the Heidelberg press in the printing department.  Whilst I have a pretty good idea about what goes on in the School of Media, I look forward to discovering more treasures in the Design School.
  • [On his first piece of art] I would say it was a large oil painting that I made when I was 17 – a view of the River Test in Southampton looking towards the distant Fawley oil refinery.  I got the paint to do what I wanted at the time but as I became older, I rejected its mimetic representation of a landscape and I am pleased to say it no longer exists – the paint having gradually fallen off through having been placed over the rising heat from my parents’ fireplace.
  • Island Race (1996), which was incredibly hard to finish because of its focus on the rise of the BNP.  I nearly gave up and am glad I didn’t because I think it remains a valuable document of that febrile time in east London.
  • Dream space is crucially important to any creative process. I have several ideas about what to make next but I am in a space where I need to dream the next idea.

William Raban is Professor of Film at London College of Communication.

http://www.arts.ac.uk/research/research-staff/a-z/professor-william-raban

http://www.lux.org.uk/collection/artists/william-raban

http://www.acme.org.uk/commissions/williamrabanfilm

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UAL in the USA

Boris Johnson

Researchers at Google have revealed that UAL is one of the most popular overseas universities for US students. Google’s research shows UAL is the ninth most searched for university among US students looking to study overseas. Google’s education team analysed US internet searches during 2014, and found that six of the ten most searched for subjects by US students looking to study overseas are arts/creative subjects. The research also found that fashion is the second most searched for course, with London College of Fashion among the most highly searched specialist institutions. London tops Google’s poll of the most searched for city by US students looking to study abroad.

Mayor of London Boris Johnson announced the research findings during his trade mission to the US, aimed at strengthening economic and cultural ties between London and the US. In his speech Boris singled out UAL for special praise, referencing UAL’s move to Stratford and our key role as one of the leading cultural and educational providers in the capital.

Museum of the City of New York

A delegation from UAL is currently visiting the States for a series of education events, including the inauguration of the New York UAL alumni group. American students make up the fourth largest international group studying at the University.

Read about the launch of UAL’s East Coast alumni group

Discover more about UAL’s American alumni groups

Read more about the Google research in the London Evening Standard