Archive for the ‘Student’ category

‘Popular Culture and the Interior’ is theme chosen by UAL Chair

Ben Kelly RDI, Chair in Interior & Spatial Design, has announced the theme which he will be working with during his tenure as a cross-university Chair at University of the Arts London:

‘Popular Culture and the Interior’

Ben Kelly

‘Popular Culture and the Interior’

Ben is interested in the ability of iconic interiors to effect and influence the direction of popular culture and the wider world. This effect has been demonstrated by the power and influence of Malcolm McLaren and Vivien Westwood’s shop at 430 Kings Road which has morphed its way through five decades from punk to couture in the form of Let it Rock to Sex and then Seditionaries and, most recently, to Worlds End. From this one small interior, via the platform of popular culture, music, fashion, graphics, law, society and its values have been simultaneously embraced, challenged and confronted.

This theme will be explored, examined and debated using a number of digital and analogue platforms. A number of activities on the subject will be announced later this year.

Anyone who is interested in learning more about Ben’s intentions for this themed project, and perhaps participating, are invited to contact Ben directly at ben.kelly@arts.ac.uk

LCC Alumni in the 100 Archive

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A Place Is A Space We Give Meaning, Paul Bailey, 2011.

The 100 Archive is a community centred initiative to document and record the past and future of visual communication design in Ireland. It is a valuable resource which acts as a simple and transparent record of the professional activity, working practices, career paths, professional associates and collaborators of Irish designers.

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A Place Is A Space We Give Meaning, Paul Bailey, 2011.

The Archive houses an impressive amount of work from LCC postgraduate alumni, including three projects by our very own MA Graphic Design Course Leader Paul Bailey as well as work from Wayne Daly, Stephen McCarthy, Brian Heffernan, Niall O’Shea and Mark Shiels.

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# Magazine, Paul Bailey, 2013.

 

Brian Heffernan, now a senior a designer at design studio Aad in Dublin, talks us through his journey from LCC to 100 Archives:

“I had been a practicing graphic designer for nearly ten years when I returned to full-time education at LCC. My year on the Contemporary Typographic Media MA proved beneficial in ways I could not have foreseen.The course facilitated the development of new criteria by which work, both mine and others, can be assessed and this in turn has enabled me to identify the potential of my practice.

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Cork Midsummer Festival Program, Brian Heffernan, 2013.

“It’s a real honour to have my work included in the 100 Archive. As a practicing designer, I find being part of the pier group identified hugely beneficial. In this regard the archive is less about Irish identity and more about being part of something that recognises good graphic design, and that benefits everyone.

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Cork Midsummer Festival Program, Brian Heffernan, 2013.

“I think the archive provides a much needed focal point for Irish graphic design. Not only does it contextualise individual projects within a wider body of work, it contextualises Irish graphic design internationally. Having little by the way of legacy, the archive documents the path Irish graphic design has taken, and in doing so, shines a light on the road ahead.”

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DCU Student Support & Development, Brian Heffernan.

Read more about MA Graphic Design

Read more about Paul Bailey

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Gyo Yuni Kimchoe Scoops Fashion Scout’s Merit Award

© Gyo Kim

© Gyo Kim

Gyo Kim, who has is half of the award-winning Gyo Yuni Kimchoe label, has just graduated from the womenswear pathway of BA Fashion. His partner Yuni Choe makes up the other half of the label.

Having been named Fashion Scout’s Merit Award winner for the spring/summer 2015 season, Gyo Yuni Kimchoe will showcase their work at London Fashion Week in September. Their on-schedule catwalk show will be fully sponsored.

Speaking to Vogue, the duo said: “We are so honoured to be selected as the winner. The Merit Award is the best opportunity for new designers to show their vision and creativity.”

© Gyo Kim © Gyo Kim © Gyo Kim © Gyo Kim

‘An exciting approach’

Originally from Korean, Gyo Kim and Yuni Choe first met in New York. They then moved to London in 2011 to continue their studies. The couple’s concern about environmental problems, social issues and animal cruelty has led them to follow a philosophy of respecting life and nature.

Phoebe English, who was on this year’s judging panel, noted their work to be “very original with an exciting approach, you can tell they really enjoyed making their collection.”

Gyo Yuni Kimchoe’s eco-friendly, quirky and unexpected designs can be seen on schedule at the Freemason’s Hall in Covent Garden in September.

© Gyo Kim © Gyo Kim © Gyo Kim © Gyo Kim
More information:
BA Fashion
Gyo Yuni Kimchoe
Fashion Scout

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LCC graduate photographer Max Colson awarded £15,000 grant from Leverhulme Trust

Max Colson 04

From ‘Hide and Seek: The Dubious Nature of Plant Life in High Security Spaces’

Recent MA Photojournalism and Documentary Photography (Online) graduate Max Colson has been awarded a Leverhulme artist-in-residency grant of £15,000 to work with the UCL Urban Laboratory.

Max will work at UCL with the Laboratory’s Director, Dr Ben Campkin, in a residency titled ‘Hide and Seek: The Dubious Nature of High Security Spaces’.

The residency will develop Max’s final LCC MA project, extending the photographic investigations of his photojournalist alter ego, the paranoid Adam Walker-Smith, into the UK’s hidden infrastructure of security design and control.

The project aims to heighten viewers’ awareness of the way that security design, surveillance and paranoia interact within the urban environment, also using humour to highlight the limits of photography as documentary evidence.

Natural Surveillance

From ‘Hide and Seek: The Dubious Nature of Plant Life in High Security Spaces’

We caught up with Max to find out more:

How did you become interested in the area of surveillance and security design?

I originally became interested in exploring how surveillance and security apparatus can be hidden within everyday public space. Delving into this area on my MA, I then became fascinated with highlighting the logistical and psychological difficulties of photographing ‘hidden’ security apparatus when one cannot easily tell where and what it is.

What do we need to know about your photojournalist alter ego Adam Walker-Smith?

Having discovered the landscape design programme ‘Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design’ (‘CPTED’), Walker-Smith realised that high security public spaces in London, which present themselves as being free and open, actually covertly guide behaviour through security design and monitor human activities through extensive surveillance infrastructure. The reason these things are not often observed is because they are carefully hidden and softened by the strategic deployment of vegetation.

This illuminating finding led to what could only be described as Walker-Smith’s intense paranoia as to the ‘innocence’ of all plant life in these spaces. His resulting photographs dramatically expose what he sees as the ‘suspect’ plants of securitised urban spaces (these plants are so-called for posing as ‘innocent’ decoration whilst actually being hidden parts of the security apparatus).

What does receiving this grant mean for you?

It gives me the financial freedom to focus on developing this particular project for a whole year, in collaboration with cutting edge researchers from UCL and other experts in the field of security design, which will culminate in an ambitious and immersive exhibition in Canary Wharf.

Also, as any artist will tell you, doing personal projects is an often solitary activity; when organisations support your projects like this it’s pretty incredible.

What direction do you hope to take your work in during your UCL residency, and beyond?

I’d like to develop Adam Walker-Smith’s investigation into the nature of hidden security design and present it as an immersive mixed media exhibition at Canary Wharf that makes people re-evaluate the public space that they use on a daily basis.

Photographic prints on a wall will be one element for sure but, in collaboration with built environment academics at UCL, I would like to create opportunities for the audience to engage with the project using a combination of interactive and audio elements; this will (I hope) bring the project, its exhibition and my photographic practice to the next level.

Tell us something you’ve discovered during Hide and Seek that surprised you.

Plants are incredibly versatile.

What most excites you most about the prospect of working within the UCL Urban Laboratory?

It’s a home to leading researchers engaged in the planning and design of the built environment; my work feeds on the research and critical ideas of these professionals, so it’s a fantastic opportunity to develop my work by being in such close proximity.

Which photographers or photojournalists working today do you most admire?

There are honestly too many to mention but I particularly enjoy the work of artists who playfully critique the nature of photographic documentation and/or its prevalence in the digital age, e.g. Joan Fontcuberta, Walid Raad, Mishka Henner, Taryn Simon, Thomas van Houtryve and Michael Wolf etc etc.

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Max’s residency will take place across the 2014-5 academic year.

Read about MA Photojournalism and Documentary Photography (Online)

Read Max Colson’s LCC alumni profile

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Nathan Shedroff Gives Five Tips For Design-Oriented MBA Students

Photo Credit: Nathan Shedroff

Photo Credit: Nathan Shedroff

In our second guest-post by Nathan Shedroff, the program chair of the Masters in Business Administration (MBA) in Design Strategy at the California College of the Arts, Nathan fuels from the success of his course to share helpful insights. Here, he gives five tips for design-oriented MBA students.

1) Numbers aren’t that scary. What likely scares design students is the experience of dealing with quantitatively-focused people who think that the numbers ARE the story (and all of it) instead of just a part of the story that needs to be told. Numbers should never make the decision (and this includes “big data”) but they should inform decisions and designers can’t be afraid of what numbers say.

2) Designers go into design fields because they’re comfortable with the qualitative in life. Traditional business people (and most business students) go into business because of the opposite—they trust numbers and “recipes” and feel lost without them. That sets-up a natural dichotomy (or even conflict). But both are necessary for informed strategy and decisions, as well as execution. Designers can help their peers better understand the power and qualitative value (which FAR outweighs quantitative value and is actually what most business people are after—they just don’t realize it or know how to phrase it). And, since most of our business peers aren’t willing to learn our language or processes, it’s up to us to learn theirs and be the translators.
3) Designers weile an incredible amount of influence (which is, ultimately, where leadership lives) because they can communicate visually. I’ve seen designers excel repeatedly within teams of mixed skills and experience because they can sketch something others are trying to articulate. In addition, our presentations are often more clear and attractive and strategy is about storytelling, after all.
4) Many qual people enter traditional business programs thinking that business has to be dry and serious to be legitimate. It doesn’t. Most “natural” business leaders and entrepreneurs know that people and ambiguity are opportunities to play, explore, and find new opportunities that others don’t see. The three tips above should explain why. A traditional degree doesn’t confer legitimacy or quality in and of itself—even at a hallowed institution. Some of the most respected programs in the world are ridiculously behind when it comes to teaching contemporary leadership, collaboration skills, design thinking, systems thinking, or project-based learning (instead of reading and regurgitating past cases). Students should look for programs that feel innovative in curriculum, teaching methods, and environment if they hope to be equipped for success tomorrow. The past isn’t an armory for the future.
5) By all means, don’t go join a business program right out of an undergraduate degree. This isn’t like an engineering, medicine, or law degree. As much as you’re rushing to become the business leader or designer you want to be, business programs require some experience to work from. Five—or even three—years of work experience gives students materials and lessons on which to draw and learn. We’ve had students ranging in age from 23 to 60 in the DMBA programs and I’ve seen the same lesson played-out in other MBA programs, as well: students simply learn more and “get more for their money” the more experience they have before they enter an MBA program.
- Nathan Shedroff, Program Chair, MBA in Design Strategy, California College of the Arts
As always, we welcome your thoughts via our survey at the bottom of the CSM MBA course page.

 

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Star LCF trio selected as Fashion Scout’s Ones To Watch

Youjia Jin, MA Fashion Design Technology Womenswear Min Wu, MA Fashion Design Technology Womenswear Keiko Nishiyama, MA Fashion Design Technology Womenswear

Not one, but three LCF alumnae have been announced as amongst Fashion Scout’s Ones To Watch.

Min Wu, MA Fashion Design Technology Womenswear 2013, has been selected for her flowing designs, whilst her classmate Keiko Nishiyama brings her intricate floral patterns to the showcase.

Finally, Youjia Jin who graduated from MA Womenswear in 2014, and whose work was seen on the LCF MA14 Catwalk, has been selected for her intriguing collection which mixes masculine and feminine elements.

Their SS15 collections will be shown as part of London Fashion Week this September, 12th to 16th.

The post Star LCF trio selected as Fashion Scout’s Ones To Watch appeared first on LCF News.

Mini Maker Faire interactive installation commission announced

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Paper Playscapes © Artemis Papageorgiou and Gabriella Mastrangelo, 2014.

The Elephant & Castle Mini Maker Faire is coming back to London this autumn, and the Digital Programmes team at the V&A recently launched an open call for the commission of an interactive installation to be exhibited as part of the Faire at London College of Communication.

The judging panel, including LCC’s Ben Stopher, have now announced that Paper Playscapes, a project by Artemis Papageorgiou and Gabriella Mastrangelo, will be commissioned from this open call.

Paper Playscapes is an open-ended installation, made and interacted with collaboratively by designers and visitors, representing a landscape in movement.

Visitors will be invited to join in assembling and creating the structure – then they can play!

Sketches

Sketches for Paper Playscapes © Artemis Papageorgiou and Gabriella Mastrangelo, 2014.

The modules that make up the piece are made out of corrugated cardboard, a sustainable cost-effective material that is easily assembled. Even though modules originate from pre-cut printed surfaces, and are therefore identical before assemblage, they are differentiated through folding and circuit-drawing.

Each cardboard module is designed to react to proximity and contact by emitting light through a series of LEDs placed on its surface. Little circuits inside the modules give them this interactive quality.

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Artemis Papageorgiou and Gabriella Mastrangelo, 2014.

The modules then become props in a game that is a variation on musical chairs. The final outcome is a landscape in the making, a participatory space for coming together for a few moments, in order to learn, make and play.

Come along and try out Paper Playscapes for yourself at the Elephant and Castle Mini Maker Faire on Saturday 15 November 2014 at LCC!

More info on the V&A blog

Visit LCC’s Mini Maker Faire page

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Central Saint Martins Celebrates Sculptural History

Image from the Frank Martin exhibition.New window displays celebrate the contribution of Frank Martin and Anthony Caro to our sculpture department in the 1950s, 60s and 70s.

Frank Martin was Head of Sculpture at St Martin’s School of Art from 1952 to 1979. Under his leadership, the department became a centre for sculptural innovation.

Prominent figures such as Anthony Caro, Tim Scott, Phillip King, William Tucker, Michael Bolus, David Annesley and Isaac Witkin worked alongside him as teaching staff or practitioners.

Known as the New Generation sculptors, these artists took part in the seminal 1965 ‘New Generation’ exhibition at the Whitechapel Gallery.

Image from the Frank Martin exhibition Image from the Frank Martin exhibition Image from the Frank Martin exhibition Image from the Frank Martin exhibition

A window on the past

A Frank Martin window display, featuring archive photographs of him and his students, is on show at Central Saint Martins until 29 August. An exhibition about Anthony Caro will run 3-17 October 2014 in window gallery B.

These displays draw on the huge number of photographs and course documents held by the Tate Archive and our Museum and Study Collection.

The two institutions are currently applying for the funding to fully catalogue the Frank Martin Archive and turn the collection into an accessible, vital resource.

More information:
Museum and Study Collection
Tate Archive

All images are courtesy of Tate Archive and our Museum and Study Collection.

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UAL’s Head of Technology Enhanced Learning presents at Wikimania conference

David_White

Wikimania is the official annual event of the Wikimedia movement, where over 2,000 delegates come together to discover a range of projects that people are making with wikis and open content.

David White, UAL’s new Head of Technology Enhanced Learning, presented a keynote in the Future of Education section of the conference. Titled ‘Now that Wikipedia’s done everyone’s homework, what’s left to teach?’, his presentation explored the possibilities for students to contribute to, rather than simply reference, Wikipedia:

“To the exasperation of many teachers, Wikipedia is the first port of call for millions of students from primary school to university. Its sheer convenience is challenging standard pedagogical approaches that implicitly assume information is scarce and difficult to duplicate. What if teachers asked students to contribute to Wikipedia instead”

You can watch David’s keynote on the Wikimania live stream page.

To find out more about technology enhanced learning at UAL visit the Centre for Learning and Teaching in Art and Design website. For specific enquiries contact cltad@arts.ac.uk.

 

A new way of referencing: Cite Them Right Online

Cite Them Right
From August 1 2014 the Cite Them Right Online (CTRO) version of Harvard will become the standard referencing style for all UAL taught courses – as endorsed by the UAL Learning, Teaching and Enhancement Committee.

Cite Them Right Online will replace The Guide to the Harvard System of Referencing produced by UAL Library Services, which will be removed from UAL web pages and will no longer be supported.

Cite Them Right Online provides searchable examples of citations and references for a wide range of media. There is also the facility to create sample records that can either be emailed or cut and pasted into a document.

In addition, the site contains very clear explanations on what is referencing and why it is important, how to avoid plagiarism, how to set out citation, how to create references for a bibliography and how to quote, paraphrase and summarise.

CTRO can be accessed directly or via e-library through the database A-Z.  A Quick Guide is also available.