Archive for the ‘Events’ category

Etta Voorsanger-Brill talks build up to Foundation Show 2015

Etta Voorsanger-Brill

With the Foundation Show just two weeks away, we spoke to Foundation Graphic and Communication Design student Etta Voorsanger-Brill about how she has been working towards the show over the past ten weeks.

Tell us a bit about your work and the inspiration behind it.

Etta: As a graphic designer, communication is really key. You have to show your work all the time to an audience who don’t know you and don’t know the thoughts behind your work. I like to reflect on personal experience and use a lot of humour within my work. If someone sees something amusing or personal it instantly becomes more relatable. I think this form of communication is really something that I base my work on.

How have you been building up to the Foundation Show?

Etta: The initial stages really began with a lot of research. We started with an open brief so a lot of the process has been about trying to find my niche. For me this meant a huge focus on research. I wanted to really know my stuff before I got into it. After research it became more about thinking how I wanted to display my work and finding a way to link all the research I had done with a medium that could best display it.

How did you feel about the brief being open?

Etta: There were things that I really wanted to look at that I hadn’t had a chance to within the other briefs we had been given. I wanted to do something quite personal with a bit of humour. I wouldn’t exactly describe myself as a hoarder but I do like to collect things. I’ve got tickets, old diaries and receipts that I wanted to use to create a more personal project, which I wouldn’t have been able to do if the brief had been restricted.

How are you currently preparing for the show?

Etta: Now the initial wave of work is done it’s about finalizing my ideas and making one last piece to sum up what I have done over the course. I am also considering how I am going to communicate my project to an audience that I have never met before.

How are people feeling within your course now that the show is only two weeks away?

Etta: I think everyone feels prepared. We’ve had a strong backbone of help and support behind the build up to the show. At the same time there is also an air of feeling slightly sad about the show. It is the last thing we will be working on as a foundation course. There’s a bittersweet element to it in this respect.

How does this show differ from ones you’ve previously worked on?

Etta: It’s been a ten-week build up, so that in itself has made it a very different experience. The finality of the show is also quite different. It has helped me to decide what I feel really passionate about and create my own body of work based on that for the first time.

What are your post-show plans?

Etta: I am really excited because I am going on to study BA Graphic Design at CSM. It was something that I had kind of had my heart set on when I started the foundation but throughout the course it increasingly became what I really wanted to do and what I felt I was best at.

More information: 

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Etta Voorsanger-Brill
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Tara McDowell – Pure Information: Conceptual Art at the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design

Image: John Baldessari, I Will Not Make Any More Boring Art, the Mezzanine Gallery, Nova Scotia College of Art and Design, 1-10 April 1971

Image: John Baldessari, I Will Not Make Any More Boring Art, the Mezzanine Gallery, Nova Scotia College of Art and Design, 1-10 April 1971

Talk by Tara McDowell

‘Pure Information: Conceptual Art at the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design’

Tuesday 26 May, 2-4pm,

Central Saint Martins, Room D113

In 1970, the coastal Canadian city of Halifax became an unexpected hotbed of conceptual art when a small art school, the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design, threw its doors open to a number of young artists who had decided that the idea mattered more than the object. Conceptual art often took the form of instructions, so it became an ideal vehicle for experimental education. Vito Acconci, Dan Graham, Lee Lozano, Yvonne Rainer, Simone Forti, Sol LeWitt, James Lee Byers, Lucy Lippard, Robert Barry, and many others retreated to Halifax for a time, and some especially influential conceptual artworks were made there. This lecture considers the Petri dish of Halifax circa 1970, and maps the everyday terrain that structured one of the most radical moments in the history of art. Rather than an aesthetics of administration or a politics of publicity, rather than artmaking as purely dematerialized, mechanized, or philosophized, imagine conceptual art circa 1970 as a site of draft dodging, game theory experiments, acid dropping, relational psychodramas, divisions and alliances, power plays, boredom, loneliness, and isolation at the end of the world. And all this at an art school.

Tara McDowell’s paper begins with a close reading of John Baldessari’s ‘I Will Not Make Any More Boring Art’ (1-10 April 1971), which was an exhibition at the Mezzanine Gallery, a small space founded in response to David Askevold’s Projects Class, an extraordinary experiment in conceptual art as pedagogy. Overall, her research has been into NSCAD as an expanded social site of making and showing, in some ways anticipating current hybrid research projects and spaces, albeit in a looser, less programmatic way. The Mezzanine is of interest less for any one exhibition that took place there – although shows such as Lee Lozano’s ‘Infofiction’ (27 January-13 February 1971) and Vito Acconci’s ‘Accessibilities’ (1-15 December 1970) perhaps stand out - and more for its relation to other forms of practice occurring simultaneously, with visual art, performance, teaching, printmaking and the NSCAD press all testing and nurturing each other.

Tara McDowell is Associate Professor and Director of Curatorial Practice at Monash University in Melbourne, Australia. She is Editor-at-Large of The Exhibitionist, a journal on curatorial practice and exhibition making for which she served as Founding Senior Editor, now published and distributed by The MIT Press. She holds a Ph.D. in the History of Art from the University of California, Berkeley and has held curatorial appointments at the CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts in San Francisco, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, and the Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art.

Anyone interested in attending this event from outside CSM should email Lucy Steeds directly for further details: l.steeds@csm.arts.ac.uk

Unannounced Acts of Publicness to Appear in Granary Square

UnAnnounced Acts

On ten unspecified days in May, ten separate artworks will appear unannounced in Granary Square.

If you’re on your way to work, eating lunch, playing in the fountains or simply having a break from the office you might encounter them. At the end of each day, the artwork will disappear without trace. Unannounced Acts of Publicness is intended to question the meaning of ‘public’ in privately owned public spaces.

The commissioned artists are from Central Saint Martins and beyond, including recent graduates and internationally renowned practitioners. For each work one person who lives or works in the area, will be invited to witness an act and make a written response.

Unannounced Acts of Publicness has been negotiated on an agreement of trust between Central Saint Martins and the landlord Argent. Only the project curators know when and what the acts will be. The programme will be announced retrospectively on 1 June. It will then be discussed publicly at the Restless Futures conference at Central Saint Martins on 11 June.

If you think you’ve witnessed any ‘Unannounced Acts of Publicness’, do let us know what you think on Twitter using #unannouncedacts. We look forward to hearing from you.

Image credit: ‘Girl’ Clara Metter 2014

More information:

Holding it Together: Art Magazines, Then and Now

A reading of five issues of Studio International magazine by Jo Melvin (2015). Film still. Camera by Oliver Beatty

A reading of five issues of Studio International magazine by Jo Melvin (2015). Film still. Camera by Oliver Beatty

Holding it Together: Art Magazines, Then and Now

Artist Pages, Policies and Criticism

Panel discussion with Jennifer Higgie, Jason Farago and Jo Melvin (Reader in Fine Art Theory at Chelsea College of Arts), convened by Antony Hudek and Alex Sainsbury

Saturday 25 April, 3-5pm  

Jennifer Higgie (writer and co-editor of Frieze) and Jason Farago (writer and founding editor of the new art magazine Even) join Jo Melvin (curator of Five Issues of Studio International, Raven Row) to discuss some of the motivations, exasperations and ambitions behind art magazines from the 1960s to the present day, broaching such questions as: What conditions compel a magazine to get started and thrive? How do magazines create and serve networks of writers and artists? What does an editor do that a writer and curator cannot?

Presented by Raven Row at Whitechapel Gallery, to coincide with the exhibition Five Issues of Studio International at Raven Row, until 3 May.

Please click here to reserve your place via the Whitechapel Gallery website.

Tickets £8.50 full price, £6.50 concession

Whitechapel Gallery
Zilkha Auditorium
77-82 Whitechapel High Street
London, E1 7QX

MA Design Alumni Exhibit in Zaha Hadid Gallery

MAD Installation 2

Central Saint Martins MA Design alumni are exhibiting their work at the Zaha Hadid Design Gallery. Opening tomorrow, the Alumni Pop Up Show will include designers from each of the course’s three areas of specialisation: ceramics, furniture and jewellery design.

Organiser Gigi Barker says, “All work shown in the exhibition is new work that the designers have produced since graduating- with an aim to show what the graduates can go on to achieve.”

Designers include ceramicists Jason Marks and Ingrid Ruemeyer; furniture designers Gigi Barker, Ana Jimenez Palomar and Kat Gross; jewellery designers Noor Fares, Flora Bhattachary, Sophie Thomas and Fernando Jorge.

The Alumni Pop Show is running from 22 – 24 April and will be open from 1pm to 6pm.

Image credit: Fernando Jorge

More information: 

 

 

MA Interim Show Exhibits Work of 72 Students

AndrewBailey_MA Interim 2015

Last Thursday saw the opening of ‘You’re the reason our kids are ugly’, this year’s MA Interim Show. The exhibition which took place over three days showcased the developing work of 72 talented first year students from our MA Art and Science, MA Fine Art and MA Photography courses.

The evening was a great success with guests ranging from artist John Stezaker, visitors from The Hague:  Aparajita Dutta Head of International Affairs Royal Academy of Art and Nineke van Beers, Head of Marketing and Recruitment at the Royal Academy of Art.

View the image gallery below to see more of the student’s work from the show.

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AndrewBailey_Interim Show 2015
AndrewBailey_Interim Show 2015
AndrewBailey_Interim Show 2015
AndrewBailey_Interim Show 2015
AndrewBailey_Interim Show 2015

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Printmaking in Changing Contexts

Paul Coldwell: Symposium - Printmaking in Changing Contexts

Paul Coldwell, Material Things: Sculpture and Prints.

Symposium: Printmaking in Changing Contexts
30th April , 1- 3pm
Cartwright Hall, Bradford

In response to Paul Coldwell’s exhibition Material Things: Sculpture and Prints at Gallery II, University of Bradford (13th March – 7th May 2015) there will be an afternoon discussion about printmaking, past, present and future. Printmaking in changing contexts will be held at Cartwright Hall, Bradford on Thursday 30th April  (1 – 3pm).

The event will be chaired by Sonja Kielty (Curator, Exhibitions, Bradford Museums and Galleries) and Andy Abbott (artist and University of Bradford) and will include a presentation by Coldwell outlining his long association with printmaking and Bradford.

Further details: http://www.bradfordmuseums.org/venues/cartwrighthall/activities.php

Free event, all welcome.

Spaces will be limited, please RSVP: 01274 431212, cartwright.hall@bradford.gov.uk

A review of Material Things can be found on the following link:  CV: Material Things

Drama Centre London talks love, sex and death

OFS

We spoke to students from Drama Centre London and their director Jonathan Martin about their most recent production, One Flea Spare, an intense play written by Naomi Wallace, set in plague ravaged London.

Why did you choose to perform One Flea Spare in particular?

Jonathan Martin: I read this play for the first time about three years ago and thought that it was a really unusually interesting play that has a lot of resonance. It is set in 1665 during the outbreak of the plague in London and when I re-read it recently it coincided with the Ebola outbreak. It’s one of those plays that because the themes are so strongly to do with survival, love, sex and death it will always have meaning. It is a very metaphorical play so you can read it in many ways. I suppose when I read it for the third time before actually choosing it, I thought yes, it’s a really unusual, terrific play and still very applicable to today.

What were your initial reactions when you found out that you would be performing this play?

Jed O’Hagan: Excited, definitely excited. I have never been in play from this period before. I really enjoyed the read through, there is just so much in the play. We all loved the characters and couldn’t wait to get stuck in.

One Flea Spare has only been performed professionally a hand full of times, how did you find inspiration for your production?

Hannah Moorish: We talked for a long time, really delving to find character inspiration, and understand the world, we tried to liken it to something we could all relate to. We had a historian come in who is a specialist on the plague so we had a real sense of the visceral feeling of the time. From there it has just really developed through rehearsals and finding out what works and what doesn’t work.

Through finding similarities between the Plague and the Ebola outbreak, did you find yourselves using quite contemporary references within the production?

Jonathan Martin: The play was first performed in 1995 so it is not a strict period piece; it is essentially a contemporary view of the period. As a result you get a very contemporary take on all sorts of issues for example, the sexual politics, class politics and the role of the body. It gives us an opportunity to investigate the play outside of the historic representation of the plague.

Hunter Bishop: It’s very much contemporary mixed with classical. For example we’ve been drawing on characters from Philocrates to Heathcliffe and contemporary films , even drawing on people that we may known in real life as well to help build on our characters behaviour.

In what ways did you feel your character has tested you?

Georgie Morton: I am playing a 12 year old and it began as this terrifying thing where you have to really consider what it is to be a child. In terms of her experiences I have to consider what she has been through, especially considering her age. I had to think about how I could use what I know and what I have been through and marry the two. But the whole play itself is completely like that. It’s about sex and death and you have to draw your own reactions into your characters. It’s been incredibly challenging.

Hannah Moorish: I would say that it has definitely pushed us the most that we have been, largely because it is such a different world. Jordan and I are playing quite old characters and, as with Georgies’ character, it is about finding the truth in their reactions. The characters experiences are so extreme that it has been testing.

Jordan Kemp: We were just talking about immanent death and mixing that in with the challenges of transformation. You have to do really imaginative work to start to realise what it might be like to be faced with that worry and then how you respond and how your character would respond to it. What’s stopping them from losing all of their stability and running for the hills? Trying to discover that strength in our characters was quite a challenge.

What is a classic Drama Centre London performance?

Jonathan Martin: I don’t think that there is such a thing as a classic DCL show. Our first duty is to do plays that are suitable for actors. We have to find plays that we think suite our particular actors, their skills and the gender balance. But we are also looking for plays that are not done to death. One Flea Spare is by an American writer and it is not that known in this country, not many people will know it – and that is becoming something that is quite important to us. We want the public facing repertoire of our actors to be interesting and unusual. I was speaking to the cast just the other day and I said that I think we follow Woody Allen when he says that the only themes of interest are the big themes, sex, love and death.

What is your next big project?

Jonathan Martin: Next term all the actors are going to be taking part in a play specially commissioned by Drama Centre London by Mark Ravenhill who is a very well known and interesting writer. He has written a play based on the aristocratic victims of the French Revolution. I think it will be another glorious portrayal of sex, death, decay and the politics around all of that.

More information:
- Event page and tickets
- Drama Centre London
- Hannah Moorish profile
- Georgie Morton profile
- Hunter Bishop profile
- Jordan Kemp profile
- Jed O’Hagan profile

Metaphonica: fine art and music collaborate

Image Credit: John Sturrock

Image Credit: John Sturrock

Last week The Street was host to ‘Metaphonica’, a night of experimentation between art and music, inspired by the historic relationship between art school and noted musicians.

With acts including Tim Exile, The Bloody Bishops, Resonance Radio Orchestra and The Perverts, the evening considered the relationship between contemporary art and musical excess.

View the gallery below to see more from the event.

More info:
BA Fine Art course page
MA Fine Art course page

Metaphonica event at Central Saint Martins, King's Cross
Metaphonica event at Central Saint Martins, King's Cross
Metaphonica event at Central Saint Martins, King's Cross
Metaphonica event at Central Saint Martins, King's Cross
Metaphonica event at Central Saint Martins, King's Cross
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Metaphonica event at Central Saint Martins, King's Cross
Metaphonica event at Central Saint Martins, King's Cross
Metaphonica event at Central Saint Martins, King's Cross

Image credit: John Sturrock

Waste-Off and LCC’s Museum of Reinvention

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The Museum of Reinvention, Waste-Off, LCC, 2015.

This week marks the conclusion of the cross-University Waste-Off Challenge, a  project to give waste new value and help promote material reuse and sharing. As part of this the Museum of Reinvention is being exhibited at LCC.

Waste-Off was launched at the end of last year by the UAL research hub Conscientious Communicators with support from Stephen Reid, Deputy Vice Chancellor of UAL, who saw the project as an opportunity to “harness the passion to drive forward change”.

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The Museum of Reinvention, Waste-Off, LCC, 2015.

Teams comprised of students, academic and technical staff came together to collect material waste and via studio working and workshops facilitated by design-maker and UAL alumnus Jan Hendzel, created collaborative inventions.

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The Museum of Reinvention, Waste-Off, LCC, 2015.

The result was the generation of diverse and inventive projects from across London College of Communication, Central St Martins, Camberwell and London College of Fashion.

LCC students, staff and alumni created  two cabinets of reclaimed, up-cycled and reinvented objects – to act as a permanent showcase of inspirational examples, teaching tools and unexpected ‘creative curiosities.’ The aim was to demonstrate that salvaged items can have greater value, character and potential than virgin materials.

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The Museum of Reinvention, Waste-Off, LCC, 2015.

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The Museum of Reinvention, Waste-Off, LCC, 2015.

Sarah Temple and Tara Hanrahan, who conceived and managed the project, explain: “We wanted people to explore the creative potential of the discarded! To show by example what is possible and through this activity help establish practical processes for staff and students to share resources and avoid contributing to landfill.”

Find out more about Conscientious Communicators here.

 

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