Archive for the ‘Events’ category

The Homeless Film Festival at LCC

homeless film festival

Between Tuesday 4 and Friday 14 November, London College of Communication will play host to an eclectic range of free film screenings as part of The Homeless Film Festival, returning to LCC for its second season.

The screenings are open to everyone but booking is essential.

The festival is dedicated to confronting and presenting homeless issues and screens high-end films from around the world, all of which have homeless issues as a central theme or are made by homeless creatives in a mixture of genres.

LCC BA (Hons) Film Practice Joint Course Leader Polly Nash works with festival organisers Dean Brocklehurst and Jamie Rhodes to coordinate LCC’s screenings, with many LCC students helping out on a voluntary basis.

Screenings //

there once was an island

Tuesday 4 November
6.30pm
There Once Was an Island
In this feature documentary, three people in a unique Pacific Island community face the first devastating effects of climate change, including a terrifying flood. Will they decide to stay with their island home or move to a new and unfamiliar land, leaving their culture and language behind forever?

fisher king

Friday 7 November
6pm
The Fisher King
A screening of Terry Gilliam’s classic ‘The Fisher King’, even more poignant after the tragic suicide of Robin Williams. A former radio DJ, suicidally despondent because of a terrible mistake he made, finds redemption in helping a deranged homeless man who was an unwitting victim of that mistake.

theanswertoeverything

Monday 10 November
7pm
The Answer to Everything + Q&A
Rupert Jones and Emma Bernard skilfully mix performances from Streetwise Opera’s homeless and ex-homeless performers with a handful of professionals including renowned soprano Elizabeth Watts to create a rich and characterful 40-minute film. A member of Streetwise Opera will take questions from the audience after the screening.

parked

Wednesday 12 November
6pm
Parked
In this Irish drama starring Colm Meaney and Colin Morgan, Fred lives a quiet, isolated life in his car, having lost all hope of improving his situation. That all changes when he forms an unlikely friendship with Cathal, a dope-smoking 21-year-old with a positive attitude, who becomes his ‘neighbour’.

the unloved

Friday 14 November
6.30pm
The Unloved + Q&A
British drama ‘The Unloved’ is the directorial debut by acclaimed actress and Homeless Film Festival patron Samantha Morton. Lucy is eleven years old. Having been neglected by her estranged mother and father, she is placed in a children’s home. Star Molly Windsor and producer Kate Ogborn will answer audience questions after the film.

View the full programme

Read about BA (Hons) Film Practice

Visit the Homeless Film Festival website

The post The Homeless Film Festival at LCC appeared first on London College of Communication Blog.

Journalism Guest Speaker Review // The VICE Vision of Journalism

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VICE’s Bruno Bayley gave the second talk in this year’s LCC Journalism Guest Speaker series. Image © Diana Tleuliyeva

On Tuesday 21 October, LCC welcomed Bruno Bayley, European Managing Editor of VICE for the second lecture in the Journalism Guest Speaker series. Third-year BA (Hons) Journalism student Diana Tleuliyeva reports.

Bayley’s lecture on the VICE vision of journalism was hotly anticipated by many – the audience ranged from UAL to City University and even Bristol University students. Everyone was intrigued to get an insight into the most provocative magazine in the country.

Since the time of its establishment in the UK in 2002, VICE magazine has undergone a lot of changes. It’s gone from being a magazine “hated for its humour” to being innovative in the way news and pop culture is covered.

“A part of my job is to make the magazine better without making it a different magazine. So, it’s about balancing, keeping that tone and the things people liked about it but actually improving the quality of it: better writers, better photographers,” said Bayley.

Bayley believes the video content on VICE has helped massively to change people’s perceptions about the magazine. A recent documentary about the Islamic State is one example.

“When I started working at VICE, there were only a few serious articles, but now we have documentaries and even a news channel. A lot of people will be surprised how VICE has changed.”

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A packed Main Lecture Theatre for Bayley’s talk. Image © Diana Tleuliyeva

VICE is known for championing the “immersionist” school of journalism and Bayley stressed this throughout the lecture: “I’d rather commission a story when someone says ‘I’m going to go to this place and do this’ rather than pieces written from a removed situation. Be immersive as much as possible.”

So, how do you get a job at a publication like VICE? Bayley recommends being proactive and useful in the workplace and doing as much work as possible.

“A lot of the journalists were interns who did well and then became regular contributors, usually progressing from the online version and then writing longer features for the magazine.”

Internships are advertised online throughout the year, giving opportunities to work for one of ten channels. Bayley himself started by writing reviews and conducting vox-pops for VICE in 2007.

Good engaging ideas are a part of the magazine’s DNA. Bayley explained: “We like to cover things that either other people haven’t covered hugely, that people wouldn’t read about elsewhere, or cover a story in a slightly different way.”

Many still accuse VICE of being too biased in comparison to the mainstream media. Obviously, objectivity is the goal of any serious publication and VICE is not an exception:

“We try to be unbiased. For example, in the Syria issue, we had an article written from Syria by pro-regime and rebel people. It’s a good example to show that we try to be as representative as possible, showing different sides.”

Founded as a fanzine in Montreal in 1994, VICE now distributes a free monthly magazine in multiple languages in 29 countries. Its ten vertical content channels cover various topics from food to technology.

In 20 years, VICE has become a global success, engaging millions of young people across the world.

Words by Diana Tleuliyeva

View the full Journalism Guest Speaker series

Read a review of ‘BBC News and the Digital Future

Read about BA (Hons) Journalism

 

The post Journalism Guest Speaker Review // The VICE Vision of Journalism appeared first on London College of Communication Blog.

Creative Enterprise Awards shortlists announced!

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University of the Arts London will be celebrating the enterprising successes of our students and recent graduates at the fifth Creative Enterprise Awards.

42 students and graduates from across University of the Arts London colleges have been shortlisted from hundreds of applications.

Winners will be announced at the Creative Enterprise Awards Night on 19 November.

The seven award categories are:

  • Freelancer
  • New Business
  • Enterprising Project
  • Digital
  • Ethical or Social Enterprise  
  • International
  • Enterprising Individual

We’ll also be announcing four Creative Enterprise College Awards.

Check out this year’s shortlist.

The awards take place as part of Creative Enterprise Week and are sponsored by NatWest.

Research // Grace Adam draws a crowd

big draw setting up

Preparing for The Big Draw. Image © Grace Adam

On Monday 20 October, students, staff and passers-by were treated to an exciting pop-up drawing session in the Typo cafe by LCC lead design tutor Grace Adam as part of Inside Out Festival 2014.

Grace’s event, ‘Framing the Elephant’, invited people to stop, look and draw, taking 10 minutes or half an hour to create a fast, fun drawing of the view from inside the College.

The highlight of #framingtheelephant - a part of #lccgradschool! #nofilter

Instagram @fbigos

A brilliant drawing by @jhartley95 at @lcclondon #framingtheelephant

Instagram @fbigos

Grace has also recently appeared on ‘Daily Brunch with Ocado‘, demonstrating a few fun and unusual ways to get drawing.

Watch the video here [starts 26:59]

Speaking about her wider involvement in ‘The Big Draw’, a national festival of drawing with events held around the country, Grace told presenters Tim Lovejoy and Simon Rimmer:

“The Big Draw was set up to get people re-engaged with drawing, having fun, and connecting to the world in a different way [...] I think it’s considered a childish thing to do, and we communicate with text. Drawing is not taken so seriously, which is a shame. It’s essential.

“I think everybody is obsessed by ‘getting it right’ and getting it to look like the real world, but your drawing will be different from my drawing. You express yourself as an individual and that’s important.

“Drawing is a pleasure, drawing is a way to look at the world, to communicate, to experiment, to explore. It’s a good thing and we’re losing it.”

If you’ve missed out this year, however, some of Grace’s own sculptural work is on show until Friday 31 October in ‘Modes of Remembrance’ at St Giles-in-the-Fields, exploring and responding to the idea of monuments and memorials within the church.

Read Grace Adam’s staff profile

Read more about Research at LCC

The post Research // Grace Adam draws a crowd appeared first on London College of Communication Blog.

Research // Grace Adam draws a crowd

big draw setting up

Preparing for The Big Draw. Image © Grace Adam

On Monday 20 October, students, staff and passers-by were treated to an exciting pop-up drawing session in the Typo cafe by LCC lead design tutor Grace Adam as part of Inside Out Festival 2014.

Grace’s event, ‘Framing the Elephant’, invited people to stop, look and draw, taking 10 minutes or half an hour to create a fast, fun drawing of the view from inside the College.

The highlight of #framingtheelephant - a part of #lccgradschool! #nofilter

Instagram @fbigos

A brilliant drawing by @jhartley95 at @lcclondon #framingtheelephant

Instagram @fbigos

Grace has also recently appeared on ‘Daily Brunch with Ocado‘, demonstrating a few fun and unusual ways to get drawing.

Watch the video here [starts 26:59]

Speaking about her wider involvement in ‘The Big Draw’, a national festival of drawing with events held around the country, Grace told presenters Tim Lovejoy and Simon Rimmer:

“The Big Draw was set up to get people re-engaged with drawing, having fun, and connecting to the world in a different way […} I think it’s considered a childish thing to do, and we communicate with text. Drawing is not taken so seriously, which is a shame. It’s essential.

“I think everybody is obsessed by ‘getting it right’ and getting it to look like the real world, but your drawing will be different from my drawing. You express yourself as an individual and that’s important.

“Drawing is a pleasure, drawing is a way to look at the world, to communicate, to experiment, to explore. It’s a good thing and we’re losing it.”

If you’ve missed out this year, however, some of Grace’s own sculptural work is on show until Friday 31 October in ‘Modes of Remembrance’ at St Giles-in-the-Fields, exploring and responding to the idea of monuments and memorials within the church.

Read Grace Adam’s staff profile

Read more about Research at LCC

The post Research // Grace Adam draws a crowd appeared first on London College of Communication Blog.

TEXTILE TOOLBOX online exhibition

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The TEXTILE TOOLBOX exhibition launches online on 13th November. It is a showcase of ten propositional design concepts inspired by Mistra research into the sustainability of the fashion and textile industry.

The exhibition platform functions as a research and public engagement 
tool formed around TED’s ‘The TEN’ – design strategies for innovative sustainability thinking and action. The exhibition proposes how these strategies can translate technical and scientific research breakthroughs into design concepts. The new products demonstrate the potential for progressing a sustainable fashion system with new materials, processes, applications and business models. The exhibits are a starting point for discussion – provocations, or ‘provotypes’ – showing us how design tools can create entirely new visions for the future of the industry. This unique online platform offers a global audience a glimpse of a sustainable future fashion industry. An industry that ultimately gives the consumer pleasure whilst also giving the planet and its inhabitants absolute consideration.

The final design pieces use a strategic ‘TEN’ approach to create beautiful fashions for style fans to savour, with aesthetics connecting and responding to the scientific research of the MISTRA Future Fashion consortium.

Exhibits:

1. Seamsdress, by Dr Kate Goldsworthy

2. A.S.A.P (Paper Cloth), by Prof Kay Politowicz, Sandy MacLennan (East Central), Dr Kate Goldsworthy, David Telfer (COS) and Dr Hjalmar Granberg (Innventia)

3. Shanghai Shirt by Prof Becky Earley (Research Profile) and Isabel Dodd

4. Inner/Outer Jacket by Clara Vuletich

5. DeNAture, by Miriam Ribul in collaboration with Hanna de la Motte (SP)

6. ReDressing Activism, by Prof Becky Earley, Emmeline Child and Bridget Harvey

7. Smörgåsbord, by Melanie Bowles (Research Profile) and Kathy Round

8. Sweaver, by Josefin Tissingh

9. Fast Refashion, by Prof Becky Earley

10. A Jumper to Lend, A Jumper to Mend, by Bridget Harvey

Resources:

The collaborations with scientists, academics and professionals, have lead to Tool Kits for action, instructions for making, resources for learning, and films to sit back and watch. International training tools and education models will be available from the site as a free download in the final report in June 2015.

Open Call:

We will also invite a global fashion design audience to submit their own sustainable future fashion projects to us, and selected works will be showcased in an open gallery on the site. We also invite reviewers to send us feedback on the exhibition and to contribute to our final project report. Get in touch for the opportunity to be part of this exciting process.

For more information:

Film // Festival success for LCC staff

72-82#2

Still from ’72-82′, William Raban.

Three members of LCC staff, William Raban, David Knight and Brad Butler, have recently been featured in film festivals around London, balancing their roles as academics and active practitioners.

Professor of Film William Raban had ’72-82′, his latest film, selected by 2014′s London Film Festival (LFF). ’72-82′ explores the first ten years of groundbreaking London arts organisation Acme Studios and their critical work in housing some of the most renowned artists of our time, such as Richard Deacon and Anthony Whishaw.

Despite having more than 50 films under his belt, William describes the making of ’72-82′ as a “completely new experience”, as it solely uses archival visual materials to revisit the formative years of the organisation.

In addition to screenings at the BFI and Acme Studios, the feature-length documentary will also be screened at LCC’s Inside Out Festival, where William is in conversation with acclaimed sculptor, the two-time Turner Prize-nominated Richard Wilson.

David Knight’s work as Senior Lecturer on BA (Hons) Film and Television at LCC has taken him beyond teaching, as he enjoys success as Director of Photography on ‘The Quiet Hour’, which was nominated for Best UK Feature Film at the 22nd Raindance Film Festival.

“It is hugely satisfying to bring my professional practice back to the classroom. Working at features level brings into play a whole new set of skills to disseminate through workshops at LCC,” said David.

Recently appointed LCC Research Fellow Brad Butler continues the trend with a screening of his short film, ‘The Unreliable Narrator, at this year’s LFF.

Read profiles of William Raban, David Knight and Brad Butler

Read about BA (Hons) Film and Television

Read about Brad Butler’s work at the Hayward Gallery

The post Film // Festival success for LCC staff appeared first on London College of Communication Blog.

Apply for the next UAL Showroom exhibition

ShowExterior

To run in conjunction with London Fashion Week and UAL Green Week, the UAL Showroom will present an exhibition of work that is a Voice for Change. Submissions should creatively challenge the status quo through foregrounding environmental and social equity within fashion. Selected work will be exhibited from January – March 2015.

We are looking for UAL students and alumni to feature in the exhibition:

Work exhibited can include:

  • Design concepts, collections and services based on principles of sustainability applied to fashion or beauty, and fashion accessories (menswear, womenswear, bags, hats, jewellery, footwear, cosmetics etc).
  • Fashion photography or illustration with a demonstrable ethic in terms ofenvironmental and / or social sustainability or story relating to this subject matter.
  • Presentation of a social enterprise operating within fashion and its communities.
  • All submissions must clearly demonstrate your ambition, methods and process undertaken
  • Visually arresting and thought provoking pieces informed by sustainability imperatives

To apply to be part of this exhibition please download the application form below:

The Creative Outlet

rtaImage

20 Oct – 23 Dec 2014
09:00 to 20:00

The Creative Outlet is an annual showcase of exciting emerging and established talent, selling unique seasonal gift ideas – ranging from innovative jewellery design to contemporary interior products.

The original works on display – designed and produced by University of the Arts London students and alumni – can all be bought directly from the exhibitors, through their online shops, and at our festive pop-up shop on 4 December, where you can meet the artists and designers, and buy their work in person.

Exhibitors: Alex Burgess, Amanda Tong, Anshu Hu, Augusta Akerman, Camilla Brueton, Celia Dowson, Charlotte Day, David Bennett, Edyta Slabonska, Emi Dixon, Emily Carter, Emma Alington, Evdokia Savva, Finchittida Finch, Gaurab Thakali, Jungeun Han, Kolin and William, Nao Creative, Observatory Place, Reiko Kaneko, Richard McDonald, Rob Halhead-Baker, Robbie Porter, Rolfe&Wills, Sarah ‘Kenikie’ Palmer, Soo Kim, Sylvia Moritz and YU Square.

Journalism Guest Speaker Review // BBC News and the Digital Future

robin pembrooke3

Robin Pembrooke described how BBC journalism is adapting to the digital era

As LCC’s Journalism Guest Speaker talks return for 2014-15, first-year BA (Hons) Journalism student Dylan Taylor reports on the first event in the series.

For the first of these guest lectures on Tuesday 14 October, we were joined by the BBC’s Head of Product for Online News and Weather Robin Pembrooke.

Pembrooke’s visit to LCC comes at an interesting and challenging time for the BBC. The corporation is attempting to advance its news content online, whilst also trying to strike a balance between appealing to consumers both young and old.

It was interesting to hear how the BBC was trying to appeal to the somewhat under-represented demographic of 16-24 year olds, regarding online news.

So how does the oldest and most recognisable broadcaster in the UK go about the digital transformation of its news content? The answer, according to Pembrooke, lies in a more personalised relationship between the news and the audience.

We were given an exciting sneak preview of the BBC’s brand new app, which would allow users to customise their own news content by choosing which areas they wanted their news from and which specific journalists they wanted to read content from.

With the app enabling the BBC to have an enhanced web presence, we were told that the launch of new digital programmes such as this did not come without its problems. It was interesting to find out that the average age of someone looking at the BBC’s homepage was 48.

Pembrooke informed us that most people of this age were very sceptical about any kind of change to an already successful online news platform. Any process that involved change of this nature would have to be a gradual process to keep consumers of all ages interested in the BBC’s news content.

For us aspiring journalists, it was intriguing to hear that the BBC was looking to allow its journalists to publish content on the go, without having to wait for the traditional news slots on television to broadcast the content first.

With the BBC’s tagging and curation now powering their storytelling, Pembrooke encouraged us to have a look at the BBC’s Chartbeat data-monitoring website.

This type of information wasn’t just for the “nerds” though. By monitoring what people were reading, Pembrooke told us that journalists would have a better understanding of what people were looking at regularly and therefore what people were more likely to view in the future.

As a final piece of advice, Pembrooke encouraged us to tweet and promote our own content effectively as in the case of Laura Kuenssberg.

Currently working for the BBC’s Newsnight programme, Kuenssberg is incredibly effective at promoting teaser content online, to get the public interested in what will be on the programme that night.

With many of us creating our own blogs and content throughout our studies, it was inspiring to hear how effectively promoting our own content could help us all up our profiles in a competitive journalistic environment.

Words by Dylan Taylor

Read about BA (Hons) Journalism

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