Archive for the ‘Events’ category

Exhibition Studies talks: Victor Wang, Sakina Dhif and Rachel Pafe

Installation of the First Stars Exhibition, 1979. Courtesy of Huang Rui.

Installation of the First Stars Exhibition, 1979. Photo: Li Xiaobin, image courtesy of Huang Rui.

Victor Wang on the First Stars Exhibitions and Sakina Dhif/Rachel Pafe on ‘Past Disquiet’

Wednesday 18 November 2015

Time: 2pm to 4pm

Venue: CSM, Room KX A002

Victor Wang will share his research on a pivotal moment in Chinese exhibition histories: the 1979 and 1980 Stars Exhibitions (星星画会). Accompanied by documentation, the presentation will consider the importance of the public sphere and civil resistance with the beginnings of a contemporaneity in post-Cultural Revolution China.

Victor Wang (王宗孚) is a curator and exhibition-maker based between London and Shanghai. Most recently he was appointed the K11 curator of the travelling and collaborative exhibition between Palais de Tokyo and K11 Art Foundation, ‘Inside China – L’Intérieur du Géant’ at the chi k11 art museum, Shanghai. Victor is also a Curator in Residence at Contemporary Art Heritage Flanders (CAHF): a knowledge platform initiated by and built around the collections of four contemporary art museums in Flanders, Belgium: S.M.A.K. (Ghent), Mu.ZEE (Ostend), MUHKA & Middelheimmuseum (Antwerp).

Sakina Dhif and Rachel Pafe will present part of an ongoing project that examines the historically repetitive desires behind archival exhibition making. They will present the second version of a performative reading that will first be given at the PARSE Biennial in Gothenburg. Using an exhibition earlier this year at MACBA, ‘Past Disquiet’ (curated by Rasha Salti and Kristine Khouri), as an entry point, they will discuss messianic time, archival impulses, haunting, withdrawal and the place of fiction in exhibition studies.

Rachel Pafe and Sakina Dhif are researcher/writers/artists based between London, Washington DC, Brussels and the floating world. Graduates of the MRes Art: Exhibition Studies programme at Central Saint Martins, University of the Arts London, they began to collaborate in 2014. Jointly they experiment in order to question the concepts of fiction, ghosts and repetition in fiction and academic writing. Sakina’s latest research looked at the Arab Image Foundation, in Beirut, Lebanon, to explore the relations existing between an art institution’s space, its collection and possible procedures. Rachel’s practice centers on iterative ideology, desire and associated politics, juxtaposing the mundane, absurd and ideal through the lens of messianism. She examines this within the exhibition format: through academic writing, fiction and a hybrid involving spoken word.

Places are limited, so please contact Dr Lucy Steeds if you are interested in attending.

Email: l.steeds@csm.arts.ac.uk

Further information about the CSM Research Group, ‘Exhibitions: Histories, Practices’.

Artsmart 2015 – book your places today!

SEE homepage_artsmart 2015

Artsmart 2015 is a one-day careers event for creative graduates from University of the Arts London, featuring talks, portfolio reviews and one to ones by leading industry guests.

This year Artsmart is taking place at London College of Communication on Thursday 9 July, offering different ways to explore your future in the creative industries:

Talks – Get insider information and hear about great opportunities from our industry partners at Artsmart Talks.

Portfolio advice – Get your portfolio reviewed by leading industry professionals at these discipline-led portfolio masterclasses in partnership with The Dots. Apply for this opportunity by 11pm on Sunday 28 June.


One to ones – Meet employers, career and business advisers, and experts to address your individual questions in these one to one advice sessions.

All talks, portfolio reviews and one to one sessions are free to all UAL graduates, students and staff.

Every year our talks and events book up fast, so reserve your places in advance at artsmartlondon.co.uk.

We look forward to seeing you at Artsmart!

The Artsmart Team

Etta Voorsanger-Brill talks build up to Foundation Show 2015

Etta Voorsanger-Brill

With the Foundation Show just two weeks away, we spoke to Foundation Graphic and Communication Design student Etta Voorsanger-Brill about how she has been working towards the show over the past ten weeks.

Tell us a bit about your work and the inspiration behind it.

Etta: As a graphic designer, communication is really key. You have to show your work all the time to an audience who don’t know you and don’t know the thoughts behind your work. I like to reflect on personal experience and use a lot of humour within my work. If someone sees something amusing or personal it instantly becomes more relatable. I think this form of communication is really something that I base my work on.

How have you been building up to the Foundation Show?

Etta: The initial stages really began with a lot of research. We started with an open brief so a lot of the process has been about trying to find my niche. For me this meant a huge focus on research. I wanted to really know my stuff before I got into it. After research it became more about thinking how I wanted to display my work and finding a way to link all the research I had done with a medium that could best display it.

How did you feel about the brief being open?

Etta: There were things that I really wanted to look at that I hadn’t had a chance to within the other briefs we had been given. I wanted to do something quite personal with a bit of humour. I wouldn’t exactly describe myself as a hoarder but I do like to collect things. I’ve got tickets, old diaries and receipts that I wanted to use to create a more personal project, which I wouldn’t have been able to do if the brief had been restricted.

How are you currently preparing for the show?

Etta: Now the initial wave of work is done it’s about finalizing my ideas and making one last piece to sum up what I have done over the course. I am also considering how I am going to communicate my project to an audience that I have never met before.

How are people feeling within your course now that the show is only two weeks away?

Etta: I think everyone feels prepared. We’ve had a strong backbone of help and support behind the build up to the show. At the same time there is also an air of feeling slightly sad about the show. It is the last thing we will be working on as a foundation course. There’s a bittersweet element to it in this respect.

How does this show differ from ones you’ve previously worked on?

Etta: It’s been a ten-week build up, so that in itself has made it a very different experience. The finality of the show is also quite different. It has helped me to decide what I feel really passionate about and create my own body of work based on that for the first time.

What are your post-show plans?

Etta: I am really excited because I am going on to study BA Graphic Design at CSM. It was something that I had kind of had my heart set on when I started the foundation but throughout the course it increasingly became what I really wanted to do and what I felt I was best at.

More information: 

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Tara McDowell – Pure Information: Conceptual Art at the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design

Image: John Baldessari, I Will Not Make Any More Boring Art, the Mezzanine Gallery, Nova Scotia College of Art and Design, 1-10 April 1971

Image: John Baldessari, I Will Not Make Any More Boring Art, the Mezzanine Gallery, Nova Scotia College of Art and Design, 1-10 April 1971. Courtesy NSCAD University, Gallery Archives, Mezzanine fonds.

Talk by Tara McDowell

‘Pure Information: Conceptual Art at the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design’

Tuesday 26 May, 2-4pm,

Central Saint Martins, Room D113

In 1970, the coastal Canadian city of Halifax became an unexpected hotbed of conceptual art when a small art school, the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design, threw its doors open to a number of young artists who had decided that the idea mattered more than the object. Conceptual art often took the form of instructions, so it became an ideal vehicle for experimental education. Vito Acconci, Dan Graham, Lee Lozano, Yvonne Rainer, Simone Forti, Sol LeWitt, James Lee Byers, Lucy Lippard, Robert Barry, and many others retreated to Halifax for a time, and some especially influential conceptual artworks were made there. This lecture considers the Petri dish of Halifax circa 1970, and maps the everyday terrain that structured one of the most radical moments in the history of art. Rather than an aesthetics of administration or a politics of publicity, rather than artmaking as purely dematerialized, mechanized, or philosophized, imagine conceptual art circa 1970 as a site of draft dodging, game theory experiments, acid dropping, relational psychodramas, divisions and alliances, power plays, boredom, loneliness, and isolation at the end of the world. And all this at an art school.

Tara McDowell’s paper begins with a close reading of John Baldessari’s ‘I Will Not Make Any More Boring Art’ (1-10 April 1971), which was an exhibition at the Mezzanine Gallery, a small space founded in response to David Askevold’s Projects Class, an extraordinary experiment in conceptual art as pedagogy. Overall, her research has been into NSCAD as an expanded social site of making and showing, in some ways anticipating current hybrid research projects and spaces, albeit in a looser, less programmatic way. The Mezzanine is of interest less for any one exhibition that took place there – although shows such as Lee Lozano’s ‘Infofiction’ (27 January-13 February 1971) and Vito Acconci’s ‘Accessibilities’ (1-15 December 1970) perhaps stand out – and more for its relation to other forms of practice occurring simultaneously, with visual art, performance, teaching, printmaking and the NSCAD press all testing and nurturing each other.

Tara McDowell is Associate Professor and Director of Curatorial Practice at Monash University in Melbourne, Australia. She is Editor-at-Large of The Exhibitionist, a journal on curatorial practice and exhibition making for which she served as Founding Senior Editor, now published and distributed by The MIT Press. She holds a Ph.D. in the History of Art from the University of California, Berkeley and has held curatorial appointments at the CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts in San Francisco, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, and the Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art.

Anyone interested in attending this event from outside CSM should email Lucy Steeds directly for further details: l.steeds@csm.arts.ac.uk

Unannounced Acts of Publicness to Appear in Granary Square

UnAnnounced Acts

On ten unspecified days in May, ten separate artworks will appear unannounced in Granary Square.

If you’re on your way to work, eating lunch, playing in the fountains or simply having a break from the office you might encounter them. At the end of each day, the artwork will disappear without trace. Unannounced Acts of Publicness is intended to question the meaning of ‘public’ in privately owned public spaces.

The commissioned artists are from Central Saint Martins and beyond, including recent graduates and internationally renowned practitioners. For each work one person who lives or works in the area, will be invited to witness an act and make a written response.

Unannounced Acts of Publicness has been negotiated on an agreement of trust between Central Saint Martins and the landlord Argent. Only the project curators know when and what the acts will be. The programme will be announced retrospectively on 1 June. It will then be discussed publicly at the Restless Futures conference at Central Saint Martins on 11 June.

If you think you’ve witnessed any ‘Unannounced Acts of Publicness’, do let us know what you think on Twitter using #unannouncedacts. We look forward to hearing from you.

Image credit: ‘Girl’ Clara Metter 2014

More information:

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