Archive for the ‘Events’ category

MA Interim Show Exhibits Work of 72 Students

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Last Thursday saw the opening of ‘You’re the reason our kids are ugly’, this year’s MA Interim Show. The exhibition which took place over three days showcased the developing work of 72 talented first year students from our MA Art and Science, MA Fine Art and MA Photography courses.

The evening was a great success with guests ranging from artist John Stezaker, visitors from The Hague:  Aparajita Dutta Head of International Affairs Royal Academy of Art and Nineke van Beers, Head of Marketing and Recruitment at the Royal Academy of Art.

View the image gallery below to see more of the student’s work from the show.

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Printmaking in Changing Contexts

Paul Coldwell: Symposium - Printmaking in Changing Contexts

Paul Coldwell, Material Things: Sculpture and Prints.

Symposium: Printmaking in Changing Contexts
30th April , 1- 3pm
Cartwright Hall, Bradford

In response to Paul Coldwell’s exhibition Material Things: Sculpture and Prints at Gallery II, University of Bradford (13th March – 7th May 2015) there will be an afternoon discussion about printmaking, past, present and future. Printmaking in changing contexts will be held at Cartwright Hall, Bradford on Thursday 30th April  (1 – 3pm).

The event will be chaired by Sonja Kielty (Curator, Exhibitions, Bradford Museums and Galleries) and Andy Abbott (artist and University of Bradford) and will include a presentation by Coldwell outlining his long association with printmaking and Bradford.

Further details: http://www.bradfordmuseums.org/venues/cartwrighthall/activities.php

Free event, all welcome.

Spaces will be limited, please RSVP: 01274 431212, cartwright.hall@bradford.gov.uk

A review of Material Things can be found on the following link:  CV: Material Things

Drama Centre London talks love, sex and death

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We spoke to students from Drama Centre London and their director Jonathan Martin about their most recent production, One Flea Spare, an intense play written by Naomi Wallace, set in plague ravaged London.

Why did you choose to perform One Flea Spare in particular?

Jonathan Martin: I read this play for the first time about three years ago and thought that it was a really unusually interesting play that has a lot of resonance. It is set in 1665 during the outbreak of the plague in London and when I re-read it recently it coincided with the Ebola outbreak. It’s one of those plays that because the themes are so strongly to do with survival, love, sex and death it will always have meaning. It is a very metaphorical play so you can read it in many ways. I suppose when I read it for the third time before actually choosing it, I thought yes, it’s a really unusual, terrific play and still very applicable to today.

What were your initial reactions when you found out that you would be performing this play?

Jed O’Hagan: Excited, definitely excited. I have never been in play from this period before. I really enjoyed the read through, there is just so much in the play. We all loved the characters and couldn’t wait to get stuck in.

One Flea Spare has only been performed professionally a hand full of times, how did you find inspiration for your production?

Hannah Moorish: We talked for a long time, really delving to find character inspiration, and understand the world, we tried to liken it to something we could all relate to. We had a historian come in who is a specialist on the plague so we had a real sense of the visceral feeling of the time. From there it has just really developed through rehearsals and finding out what works and what doesn’t work.

Through finding similarities between the Plague and the Ebola outbreak, did you find yourselves using quite contemporary references within the production?

Jonathan Martin: The play was first performed in 1995 so it is not a strict period piece; it is essentially a contemporary view of the period. As a result you get a very contemporary take on all sorts of issues for example, the sexual politics, class politics and the role of the body. It gives us an opportunity to investigate the play outside of the historic representation of the plague.

Hunter Bishop: It’s very much contemporary mixed with classical. For example we’ve been drawing on characters from Philocrates to Heathcliffe and contemporary films , even drawing on people that we may known in real life as well to help build on our characters behaviour.

In what ways did you feel your character has tested you?

Georgie Morton: I am playing a 12 year old and it began as this terrifying thing where you have to really consider what it is to be a child. In terms of her experiences I have to consider what she has been through, especially considering her age. I had to think about how I could use what I know and what I have been through and marry the two. But the whole play itself is completely like that. It’s about sex and death and you have to draw your own reactions into your characters. It’s been incredibly challenging.

Hannah Moorish: I would say that it has definitely pushed us the most that we have been, largely because it is such a different world. Jordan and I are playing quite old characters and, as with Georgies’ character, it is about finding the truth in their reactions. The characters experiences are so extreme that it has been testing.

Jordan Kemp: We were just talking about immanent death and mixing that in with the challenges of transformation. You have to do really imaginative work to start to realise what it might be like to be faced with that worry and then how you respond and how your character would respond to it. What’s stopping them from losing all of their stability and running for the hills? Trying to discover that strength in our characters was quite a challenge.

What is a classic Drama Centre London performance?

Jonathan Martin: I don’t think that there is such a thing as a classic DCL show. Our first duty is to do plays that are suitable for actors. We have to find plays that we think suite our particular actors, their skills and the gender balance. But we are also looking for plays that are not done to death. One Flea Spare is by an American writer and it is not that known in this country, not many people will know it – and that is becoming something that is quite important to us. We want the public facing repertoire of our actors to be interesting and unusual. I was speaking to the cast just the other day and I said that I think we follow Woody Allen when he says that the only themes of interest are the big themes, sex, love and death.

What is your next big project?

Jonathan Martin: Next term all the actors are going to be taking part in a play specially commissioned by Drama Centre London by Mark Ravenhill who is a very well known and interesting writer. He has written a play based on the aristocratic victims of the French Revolution. I think it will be another glorious portrayal of sex, death, decay and the politics around all of that.

More information:
- Event page and tickets
- Drama Centre London
- Hannah Moorish profile
- Georgie Morton profile
- Hunter Bishop profile
- Jordan Kemp profile
- Jed O’Hagan profile

Metaphonica: fine art and music collaborate

Image Credit: John Sturrock

Image Credit: John Sturrock

Last week The Street was host to ‘Metaphonica’, a night of experimentation between art and music, inspired by the historic relationship between art school and noted musicians.

With acts including Tim Exile, The Bloody Bishops, Resonance Radio Orchestra and The Perverts, the evening considered the relationship between contemporary art and musical excess.

View the gallery below to see more from the event.

More info:
BA Fine Art course page
MA Fine Art course page

Metaphonica event at Central Saint Martins, King's Cross Metaphonica event at Central Saint Martins, King's Cross Metaphonica event at Central Saint Martins, King's Cross Metaphonica event at Central Saint Martins, King's Cross Metaphonica event at Central Saint Martins, King's Cross 150313_183 Metaphonica event at Central Saint Martins, King's Cross Metaphonica event at Central Saint Martins, King's Cross Metaphonica event at Central Saint Martins, King's Cross

Image credit: John Sturrock

Waste-Off and LCC’s Museum of Reinvention

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The Museum of Reinvention, Waste-Off, LCC, 2015.

This week marks the conclusion of the cross-University Waste-Off Challenge, a  project to give waste new value and help promote material reuse and sharing. As part of this the Museum of Reinvention is being exhibited at LCC.

Waste-Off was launched at the end of last year by the UAL research hub Conscientious Communicators with support from Stephen Reid, Deputy Vice Chancellor of UAL, who saw the project as an opportunity to “harness the passion to drive forward change”.

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The Museum of Reinvention, Waste-Off, LCC, 2015.

Teams comprised of students, academic and technical staff came together to collect material waste and via studio working and workshops facilitated by design-maker and UAL alumnus Jan Hendzel, created collaborative inventions.

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The Museum of Reinvention, Waste-Off, LCC, 2015.

The result was the generation of diverse and inventive projects from across London College of Communication, Central St Martins, Camberwell and London College of Fashion.

LCC students, staff and alumni created  two cabinets of reclaimed, up-cycled and reinvented objects – to act as a permanent showcase of inspirational examples, teaching tools and unexpected ‘creative curiosities.’ The aim was to demonstrate that salvaged items can have greater value, character and potential than virgin materials.

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The Museum of Reinvention, Waste-Off, LCC, 2015.

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The Museum of Reinvention, Waste-Off, LCC, 2015.

Sarah Temple and Tara Hanrahan, who conceived and managed the project, explain: “We wanted people to explore the creative potential of the discarded! To show by example what is possible and through this activity help establish practical processes for staff and students to share resources and avoid contributing to landfill.”

Find out more about Conscientious Communicators here.

 

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BA (Hons) Advertising student premieres romantic drama Handle with Care at Cineworld

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Handle with Care (2015) in production.

Third-year LCC student Tope Phillips has just completed his second feature Handle with Care, a British romantic drama exploring the highs and lows of love and friendship within a circle of five twenty-somethings living in London’s evolving suburbia.

The film touches on issues faced in contemporary relationships including interracial dating, serial daters, the challenges of commitment and many others, premiering recently at Cineworld Canary Wharf.

Watch the trailer //

We caught up with Tope to find out more about his work.

How did you first get into filmmaking?

I have always had an interest in films and writing, however I first got into filmmaking in my first year of university. I discovered I had a flair for filmmaking after I worked on a couple of projects.

One of my old friends Josh Bridge then contacted me, after seeing some of my work, about teaming up and creating films together at the end of 2012. We got together with the same vision and we have created two films together [the first was Squeeze, which premiered at Cineworld Chelsea].

What do you most enjoy about the process as a whole?

I enjoy every part of filmmaking, from the writing and developing of the storyline and scripts, to the audition, meeting and getting to know the actors during the rehearsals, and selecting locations for filming.

I also really enjoy the production and all the technical aspects of filming such as lighting, selecting the lenses and using different equipment on set such as the rigs and mini-cranes, and the post-production aspects such as editing, selecting the film soundtrack, designing the posters and then promoting the film.

Seeing the whole plan come together was very rewarding, however I would say my favourite part of the process was the production. This was the most rigorous, however also the most rewarding.

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What has so far been the biggest challenge?

The biggest challenge was during the production of the film, we had really long days with some days starting shooting at 9am till 3-4am and resuming filming the next day at 9am.

We also had really big scenes like a scene at a comedy club where we had over 50 extras, so we had to be really organised in order for things to run smoothly.

Handle with Care is about dating in London – obviously there are a lot of films exploring this area, so what did you particularly want to address in your own film?

We made sure this film wasn’t like the typical romantic comedy/drama with the typical fairytale ending.

We made sure the characters were real and relatable and touched on many issues in young people’s relationships today such as interracial dating when parents and other parties may not approve, relationships where one party is eager to get married whilst the other isn’t, serial dating and the impacts it has, and lots more.

We also focused it on a group of friends so we could tell multiple stories at the same time.

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Behind-the-scenes moments during shooting.

You’re currently studying BA (Hons) Advertising – how do you think this has helped your filmmaking?

Studying advertising gave me a can-do attitude, it definitely helped me in seeing things from different point of views.

Advertising involves a lot of planning and developing ideas which is essential in filmmaking. My lecturers helped to keep me motivated and encouraged me to pursue filmmaking.

What’s next for you?

Hopefully I can carry on making films on a bigger, better scale in the future. I also really like advertising so I might work in the advertising industry for some time.

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Third-year BA (Hons) Advertising student and filmmaker Tope Phillips

Visit the Handle with Care website

Read more about BA (Hons) Advertising

The post BA (Hons) Advertising student premieres romantic drama Handle with Care at Cineworld appeared first on London College of Communication Blog.

Review // PR Guest Lecture: Anaïs Hayes, Google UK

Google logo for blog

Second-year BA (Hons) Public Relations student Mary Davoudi reports on LCC’s recent PR Guest Lecture by Google UK’s Head of Brand Development, Anaïs Hayes.

Anaïs’s engaging speech shared her extensive insights from Google on how technology is changing marketing communications and reorganising brands and businesses.

She reminded us that the rise of technology today is the slowest it has ever been, and it is only going to speed up, as the 2.8 billion people who are online now are expected to at least triple in the next five or six years.

She compared it to Moore’s Law and stated that every single year the number of connections we can fit into a device will double. Not only will it get faster but also smaller and a lot cheaper.

She shared the amazing fact that mobile data in 2014 was 12 times the size of the entire internet in 2000. She reminded us that access to connections is also getting much more global and there are 10 billion devices worldwide; more people have access to a mobile device than a toothbrush!

Anaïs introduced the concept of instant gratification: how as consumers we will wait only two seconds for a webpage to load. Linked to this, it is not only the device or the message that matters, but the speed of the message. If, in those two seconds, the page is not loading, we immediately go to a competitor’s website.

As a result consumer behaviour can be understood by a completely different www acronym. It is not world wide web anymore, it is ‘what I want, where I want, when I want it’ – and if I can’t have that I will go somewhere else.

Baking speed into every concept you present to a client is crucial, Anaïs reminded us. According to her, businesses that support this are the businesses that succeed. Success is now based around ease, fluency and service.

Anaïs also discussed YouTube being not just a digital platform but the largest focus group in the world, where people will comment, like and view things and let your brand know what they like in real-time. As a public relations practitioner or a brand marketer, you can react to these changes immediately.

She highlighted an example of car brand Honda, who launched two different versions of their advert to see which one attracted more people. The one that got fewer views was taken down and all ad spend focused on the most successful one.

During her speech, Anaïs showed us a short video of a child playing with an iPad. In the next shot the child is seen playing with a magazine which she thinks is a touch screen iPad. Instead of turning the pages, she tries to touch them with her fingers.

The video demonstrated that we shouldn’t just be thinking about the current generation but focusing our expectations on future generations who have entirely different ways of thinking and behaving. As public relations practitioners we have to be ahead of the curve to advise our clients on these changes.

Anaïs also introduced another important concept for the future of communications and marketing: permission-based media.

It used to be that if brands showed you something frequently enough, eventually as a consumer you would buy it. Now, when an ad annoys you, you can avoid it.

As a result communications need to become permission-based. People don’t buy from brands. People buy from people. Brands need to work hard to understand how to do this to ‘hear’ consumer’s permission.

Anaïs finished her lecture by reminding us that in the 1920s, messages were presented on cinema screens metres away from us; in the 1960s to 1980s the message was in our living room via television. Then on our laptops and tablets.

Then we start becoming more personally involved and today we have wearable technology such as Google Glass. Is this the future of communications and marketing?

Studies show that the closer information is to cerebral cortex the more effectively it is processed, while it is predicted that in 2020 there will be 250 million wearable devices. What will this do to the discipline?

Words by Mary Davoudi

Read more about BA (Hons) Public Relations

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Jo Glover, Senior Graphic Designer at the V&A and LCC alumna, talks us through her designs for Alexander McQueen: Savage Beauty

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Savage Beauty Poster, Jo Glover, V&A, 2015.

The V&A’s record-breaking current exhibition, Alexander McQueen: Savage Beauty, is the first and largest retrospective of the late designer’s work to be presented in Europe.

LCC alumna Jo Glover, who graduated from BA (Hons) Graphic and Media Design in 2006, is Senior Graphic Designer at the V&A, and has been in charge of developing the design identity of the exhibition. Jo has been involved in every detail of the show from the selection of the lead image and designing the promotional campaign, to perfecting the details of the guides, leaflets and invitations.

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Savage Beauty, Jo Glover, V&A, 2015.

The exhibition will showcase McQueen’s visionary body of work. Spanning his 1992 MA graduate collection to his unfinished A/W 2010 collection, McQueen’s designs will be presented with the dramatic staging and sense of spectacle synonymous with his runway shows.

We caught up with Jo to find out more about her journey from LCC to the V&A.

So Jo, can you tell us a little bit about your role as senior graphic designer at the V&A? How did you get to this job, and what do you enjoy about it?

I got the job in 2011 after working at ad agency Wieden+Kennedy and doing my MA at the RCA. I also worked in branding for three years at Venturethree which helped with the more commercial work I do for marketing.

The job at the V&A combines the parts I loved from the advertising and branding jobs with my first job in the arts and cultural sector designing books for the likes of the RA. I love the variety of working on beautiful luxury print through to exhibition design and way finding. It never gets boring and is always a challenge.

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Savage Beauty, Jo Glover, V&A, 2015.

Can you explain your involvement in the Savage Beauty exhibition? What excited you about it and what you were nervous about?

I worked closely with marketing and press and the curatorial team to make sure we told the story of the exhibition through the print and digital campaign. I had to really fight for the very macabre savage image because it could be seen as intimidating but I think the lead image encapsulates the whole idea of both savage and beauty.

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Savage Beauty, Jo Glover, V&A, 2015.

So what was important to you in your approach to the designs for Savage Beauty?

In my approach to the savage beauty designs it was important to capture the slick high end luxury feel whilst retaining the darkness that comes through Lee McQueen’s work. We also really wanted to highlight the less known collections as well as the obvious ones. The events like the dinner are very high profile with a number of celebrity guests so we used lots of beautiful embossing, matte and gloss contrasts, and great paper.

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Savage Beauty, Jo Glover, V&A, 2015.

How would you describe your style and design sensibilities?

I’d say my style and design sensibilities are very pure, clean and quite classic but this obviously depends on the brief and market I’m working to. You have to be able to adapt and embrace styles that work with the audience or visitors you are targeting.

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Savage Beauty, Jo Glover, V&A, 2015.

How did LCC prepare you for life in the working world?

LCC prepared me so well for the working world because I did the industrial placement year where I got valuable experience from Elle magazine in London, the Chase in Manchester and Storm design in Melbourne, Block Branding in Perth and Principals branding and 2Birds design in Sydney. I also worked at Why Not Associates in London when I got back. This allows you to work out what you like and don’t like and also to travel and experience many different ways of working.

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Savage Beauty, Jo Glover, V&A, 2015.

Can you give one piece of advice for an aspiring graphic design student?

My one piece of advice would be to work hard, don’t be scared to make mistakes, and make lots of tea to get involved if you’re on a placement!

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Savage Beauty, Jo Glover, V&A, 2015.

Find out more about BA (Hons) Graphic and Media Design

Read Jo’s alumni profile

Find out more about Alexander McQueen: Savage Beauty and book tickets

The post Jo Glover, Senior Graphic Designer at the V&A and LCC alumna, talks us through her designs for Alexander McQueen: Savage Beauty appeared first on London College of Communication Blog.

Research presentations on Exhibition Studies – 24 March

Paulo Nazareth, Noticias de America [News from the Americas], 2011–12 (Michelle Sommer)

Paulo Nazareth, Noticias de America [News from the Americas], 2011–12 (Michelle Sommer)

Tuesday 24 March 2015
Time: 10am to 1pm
Venue: CSM, Room KX D119

Presentations by 3 members of staff/visiting scholars:

Erika Tan (4D Pathway tutor at Central Saint Martins) will speak about her current research for her next film, focusing on ‘minor exhibition histories’ through the figure of a forgotten Malay weave/performer within the Empire Exhibition at Wembley in 1924.

Maria Iñigo Clavo (visiting research fellow in Exhibition Studies, from the University of São Paulo) will reflect on how to display history. What happens when you rub a work of contemporary art up against one from the colonial era, or against an ethnographic artefact?

Michelle Sommer (visiting PhD candidate in Exhibition Studies, from the Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul) will speak about her current research into contemporary practices of ‘errancy’ in Brazilian art, reflecting on artistic proposals for which being in motion is a fundamental condition. The leading question is: how to exhibit an art that escapes the frame of an exhibition, or how is it possible to write new exhibition narratives to discuss these artworks?

Places are limited, so please contact Dr Lucy Steeds if you are interested in attending:

Email: l.steeds@csm.arts.ac.uk

Further information about the CSM Research Group: Exibition Histories Practices.

Hammad Nasar: Navigating the Afterlife of ‘The Other Story’ – 14 April

Cover of the exhibition catalogue for ‘The Other Story’, Hayward Gallery, 1989

Cover of the exhibition catalogue for ‘The Other Story’, Hayward Gallery, 1989

Tuesday 14 April 2015
Time: 10am to 12.30
Venue: CSM, Room KX D107

A presentation by Hammad Nasar.

Tate Britain’s exhibition ‘Migrations: Journeys into British Art’ (2012) can be seen as an attempt to map the impact of immigrant artists on the landscape of ‘British’ art over the past 500 years. It can also be positioned as an effort to productively complicate the ‘Britain’ in Tate Britain. But if we sharpen our focus to one of the nine galleries covering different eras that comprised the exhibition, it can be read as a partial restaging of the Hayward Gallery’s ‘The Other Story: Afro-Asian Artists in Post-war Britain’ (1989).

‘The Other Story’ – Rasheed Araeen’s polemical intervention – is among the small number of historically significant exhibitions in 1989 that have collectively shaped a new geography of contemporary art. But I do not see ‘Migrations’ as an example of the de rigueur reconstruction of key exhibitions. I see it, instead, as an inadvertent restaging: compelled, as if by a ghost, to address questions that have been left unanswered.

Based on access to Araeen’s personal archives, this paper begins a longer-term inquiry into how the artworks, and the discourses they were embedded in, changed during the 23 years it took them to move from the South Bank to Milbank. It also asks, through specific examples based on recent exhibitions in Asia, if migration ‘into British Art’ is matched by an emigration out of other places? Where does British art history intercept with that of Pakistan, the Philippines, or Taiwan?

Places are limited, so please contact Dr Lucy Steeds if you are interested in attending:

Email: l.steeds@csm.arts.ac.uk

Further information about the CSM Research Group: Exibition Histories Practices.