Archive for the ‘Exhibitions’ category

MA Photography alumna features in ArtGemini Prize 2014 at Singapore Art Fair

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‘Stars 8′, Ellie Davies, 2014. (Source material credit: STScI/Hubble & NASA).

MA Photography alumna Ellie Davies (2008) has scooped 1st Prize Photography in the ArtGemini Prize 2014.

The annual ArtGemini Prize is a celebration of international contemporary art for emerging and estalished artists around the world.

Ellie’s winning work ‘Stars 8′ (pictured above) is part of her recent ‘Stars’ series, in which she explores her desire to balance a relationship with the wild places of her childhood and a sense of disconnection from the natural world.

The work is a response to the experience of gazing at landscapes as a tourist, while living in urban or semi-urban areas, which often alienates viewers from the scene in front of them.

‘Stars’ attempts to address both the mystery and material sensuality of our landscapes and interposes photographs of ancient forests with images of the Milky Way, Omega Centauri, the Norma Galaxy and Embryonic stars in the Nebula NGC 346.

The ArtGemini Prize is showing this month at the Singapore Art Fair, where Ellie has been selected to exhibit alongside two other artists from the 2014 Shortlist, Jaykoe and Adrian Scicluna.

The Singapore Art Fair runs from Thursday 27 – Sunday 30 November 2014 at The Suntec Singapore Convention & Exhibition Centre, Suntec City, Singapore.

The ArtGemini Prize can be found at Booth D10, so we hope that any of our readers who are in town will stop by to take a look!

Read more about MA Photography

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LCC Postgraduate Shows 14 // Spotlight on MA Sound Arts

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‘Found Composition’, Gilda Manfring, 2014

The second of our Postgraduate Shows 2014 – featuring MA Sound Arts – is just a few days away, and we’ve had a sneak preview of the work on show.

MA Sound Arts is an intensive, specialised course which gives students the chance to develop their conceptual and contextual understanding of sound arts in practice and theory, while tapping into the Creative Research into Sound Arts Practice (CRiSAP) research centre.

Each of the twelve students on the course has developed their own individual approach and built a distinctive portfolio – so what can we expect to see at Hackney’s Angus-Hughes Gallery this year?

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‘Found Composition’, Gilda Manfring, 2014

Gilda Manfring’s ‘Small pieces loosely joined’ is a journey of research and investigation resulting in a body of experimental scores and sound compositions.

The work is collected in a self-published book and CD and partially presented in the wall of the gallery, and unfolds as a collection of accidental discoveries rather than the execution of an idea.

Gilda’s practice is based in experimental electronic composition, using and re-using sounds mainly found in invisible places like the internet or her mind, with improvisation and spontaneity at the core of her process.

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‘#HLMB / He Loves My Body’, Dan Helgi Helgason í Gong, 2014.

‘#HLMB / He Loves My Body’ by Dan Helgi Helgason í Gong seeks to question the assumptions we make about people through voice, looks and gestures.

This sound and visual piece draws inspiration from contemporary dancers and pop lyrics written about sexual adoration from a woman to a man, and how this kind of adoration is much less prominent when it comes to men in pop music who identify as gay.

Dan Helgi sets out to critique the heteronormative world of pop by exploring gender-norms as well as making a critique of ourselves as judges.

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‘Seeing with Ears’, Jamie Lu, 2014.

Jamie Lu’s video walk ‘Seeing with Ears’ takes the audience on a tour of London’s West End, based on his own relationship with the area.

Jamie has spent most of his spare time in the West End this year and is passionate about its theatres and their work. In creating this piece he gave his emotional responses to this part of London a shape, and transformed them into sound, expressing feelings that could not be articulated in speech.

His intention is that ‘Seeing with Ears’ will give those who are familiar with the West End a new point of view while newcomers receive an introduction to the district via Jamie’s own experiences.

The exhibition will close with a symposium and performance evening on Sunday 7 December. The symposium will focus on the place of research in creative practice, with talks from sound artists Lisa Busby and Mark Peter Wright, as well as contributions from the students and Course Leader Salomé Voegelin, chaired by the exhibition’s curator Irene Revell.

The symposium will also be an opportunity to engage directly with the students’ research.

Following this will be an evening of performance, including works by Tian Bai, Rebecca E Davies (with Holly Jarvis), Gary Fisher and Emre Yağcı.

Below are details of the exhibition and events programme:

Postgraduate Shows 2014: School of Media, MA Sound Arts
Private View: Monday 1 December 7-9pm
Exhibition open: Tuesday 2 – Sunday 7 December
See opening times: www.angus-hughes.com
Late opening: Thursday 4 December until 9pm
Symposium and Performances: Sunday 7 December
RSVP for symposium and performance evening to: Lisa Hall, crisap@arts.ac.uk
Venue: Angus-Hughes Gallery, Hackney, E5 0PD

Read more about MA Sound Arts

Read more about CRiSAP

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Awarded UAL MPhil Maria Christoforatou exhibits in London

Maria Christoforatou graduated earlier this year from CCW with an MPhil, we caught up with her to talk about her experience at UAL and what she has been doing since.

Why did you choose to study your PhD at CCW? Was it a good experience?

I chose to study at CCW because I was confident in the high academic standards and knowledgeable and experienced tutors. It was challenging and enriching experience throughout.

What was the transition from PhD researcher to independent practitioner like?

Since finishing my PhD/MPhil course, less than a year ago, I had 3 solo exhibitions and several group shows. I feel well equipped to explore and present my ideas and my work. I am ready to dedicate myself to further developing and expand my artistic vision.

How has the PhD/MPhil influenced your work and career?

It gave me a deeper understanding of both the theoretical and practical aspects of art. Also the extensive study and research opened doors to better appropriating the various aspects of my practice.  Most of all it gave me confidence in expressing my ideas and putting them into work.

Tell us about the work you are including in this solo exhibition; is it different from your PhD/MPhil work?

I am expanding the research that I have undertaken and developing new vision and possibilities for my art work.

Maria Christoforatou: Constructing Spaces

28 November – 30 November 2014
The Chocolate Studios, Flat 21, Shepherdess Place 7, London N1 7LJ
RSVP/contact: kornelia.pawlukowska@gmail.com

 

The exhibition Constructing Spaces presents new works by London based artist Maria Christoforatou. Christoforatou works across a variety of medium including drawings on paper, installations, sculpture, oil paintings and most recently collage.

 

Her practice examines the emotional effects of displacement in relation to notions of home as a place of refuge and departure, as well as the ways in which art can expose the effects of forced displacement, making observable such feelings as fear,
pain and loss. It is clear that her own personal experiences from the past, which has seen her lose two homes in fire has had a huge impact on her artistic practice.

Maria Christoforatou Constructing Spaces

Through her research Christoforatou examines critically the relationship between the romanticised notion of home, as a place of safety, security, comfort and belonging, and the emotional and material impact of its loss.

To express this concept, the artist deconstructs architectural and physical elements of a house, that are normally seen but overlooked, such as pipes or scaffoldings, to recreate a variety of pieces. By doing this Christoforatou emphasises that the
concept of a home can be very unstable, precarious and vulnerable reflecting the many changes and insecurities that humans have to face today.

The limited use of colour, the absence of people, the use of subtle lines, juxtaposed with the reproductions of Tudor and Victorian houses, as well as gable houses, are what characterise and distinguish Christoforatou’s work.

About Maria

Maria Christoforatou received her BA (Hons.) in Fine Art from the Athens School of Fine Arts (ASFA) in Greece and her MA in Fine Art from Wimbledon College of Arts, University of the Arts London. Recently she graduated from CCW Chelsea College of Arts, University of the Arts London with an MPhil in Fine Art Practice-based research. As part of her research she has been investigating narratives of home and displacement in contemporary art practice.

She recently had a solo exhibition called ‘Dislocated’ at The Gallery @Idea Store Whitechapel, London, UK (2014) and another called, ‘Un-build’, at the Galeria-Atelier Metamorfose, Porto, Portugal (2013). During her career she has taken part in shows in Greece, UK, Italy, Canada, Germany, The Netherlands and USA, and awarded academic scholarships for her work in Greece (Academy of Athens, IKY). She has also been involved in organizing numbers of workshops in London for Tate Galleries, Barbican, Parasol Unit and The National Gallery as well as in Greece and Italy.

Further information about the artist:

LCC MA Photography final show prizes 2014

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’54°0’13.176”N 2°32’52.278”W’, Sproxton Award winner Véronique Rolland, video, 2014.

As part of our Postgraduate Shows 2014, on Tuesday 25 November MA Photography students received a range of prestigious prizes honouring different aspects of photographic practice.

In this sixteenth final show for MA Photography, LCC was very happy to again host the Sproxton Award for Photography as well as awards by Photoworks, MACK, Photofusion and Troika Editions.

The Sproxton Award for Photography
The prize is given each year to one student in the MA Photography final show, as judged by a panel consisting of an industry professional and MA Photography alumnus. The winners receive £1000 to help kickstart their photography careers.

The prize was set up by David Sproxton from Aardman Animations in memory of his brother Andrew Sproxton, who together with Val Williams founded the Impressions Gallery in York in 1972. Judged by Phillip Prodger (National Portrait Gallery) and Kate Elliott (MA Photography 2009 alumna).
Winner: Véronique Rolland

The Photofusion Prize
Located in Brixton, Photofusion is an independent photography resource centre and gallery that offers studio and darkroom hire, digital printing, film processing, training and professional support. It also delivers a wide range of community outreach and participatory projects.

The prize consists of a voucher worth £200 redeemable against any of Photofusion’s services, including mentoring and portfolio advice, scanning, film processing, courses and use of rental facilities. Judged by Paul Ellis and Jenna Banat of Photofusion.
Winner: Xiaoyi Chen

Troika Photography Award
Troika Editions is delighted to support the LCC MA graduate programme with the Troika Photography Award, a 12-month mentoring programme. Judges and Troika Editions co-founders Bridget Coaker and Michael Walter select a winner from the MA degree show.

The successful graduate is supported for 12 months, through curatorial advice and critical reviews during their post-university projects, to the equivalent monetary value of £1500.
Winner: Paloma Tendero

The Photoworks Prize
The winner of the prize is featured and interviewed in the Photoworks online showcase and receives free Photoworks Membership for a year.

Photoworks curates, commissions and publishes photographic work and new writing about photography and produces projects, exhibitions, books, the Brighton Photo Biennial and Photoworks Annual. Judged by Celia Davies, director of Photoworks, and Mariama Attah.
Winner: Holger Pooten
Commendations: Lu Zhang, Sarah Janes

The MACK Award
Publisher MACK presents the MACK Award, established in 2013, which offers the winner a prize of a £200 voucher for the purchase of MACK books, and the opportunity to take part in a three-month internship at MACK’s London office. Judged by Michael Mack, director of MACK.
Winner: Liz Orton
Commendations: Emilie Sandy, Amber Rowlands, Jisun Choi

The MA Photography final show, featuring work by these students and many more, is open until Monday 1 December.

Read more about MA Photography

Visit the LCC Postgraduate Shows 2014 page

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LCC Postgraduate Shows 14 // Spotlight on PGDip Photography Portfolio Development

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‘Her Light, My Life’, Manuel Perez de Guzman Luengo, 2014.

In the third of our previews looking at the first Postgraduate Show of the year, we find out more about PGDip Photography Portfolio Development at LCC and share some of the exhibiting students’ work.

Postgraduate Diploma Photography Portfolio Development nurtures talented photographers working at the cutting edge of contemporary practice, helping them to develop a high quality portfolio and the professional skills to launch a successful photographic career.

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‘Her Light, My Life’, Manuel Perez de Guzman Luengo, 2014.

This year, Manuel Perez de Guzman Luengo presents ‘Her Light, My Life’, exploring the relationship between his late mother’s vernacular photography and his own through a series of diptychs.

This highly personal project sees Manuel attempting to learn more about his mother through the photography she left behind.

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‘Untold’, Tomila Akhmadieva, 2014.

Tomila Akhmadieva’s ‘Untold’ is about physical human scars and the emotional narratives behind them.

Tomila explores the idea of a scar as something intimate, not shared with everyone, which carries with it a hidden story.

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‘Flowers in the Window’, Ray Chang, 2014.

In ‘Flowers in the Window’, Ray Chang develops ideas of loneliness and isolation, illustrating how flowers and everything they signify can give an emotional lift to those in need.

His mood-based work brings together the ideas of strangers, barriers, windows and London living.

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‘Babushka’, Sofya Bredikhina, 2014.

Sofya Bredikhina’s project ‘Babushka’ is dedicated to one of the most serious problems in Russia – the inadequate living conditions of elderly people struggling to survive on government pensions.

Their faces are intended to provoke a strong emotional response and show inner strength, wisdom, loneliness and despair.

Much more equally thought-provoking work is on show here from Tuesday 25 November – we hope to see you soon!

School of Media: MA Documentary Film, MA Photography, PGDip Photography Portfolio Development
Exhibition open: Tuesday 25 November-Monday 1 December
Private View: Tuesday 25 November 6-9pm
RSVP to Private View
Late night opening: Thursday 27 November until 9pm

Read more about PGDip Photography Portfolio Development

 

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LCC Postgraduate Shows 14 // Spotlight on MA Photography

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‘In Case’, Ji Sun Choi, 2014.

With the first of our Postgraduate Shows just days away, we continue our show previews with a look at what MA Photography students have in store.

Exhibiting in our Upper Street, Well and Atrium Galleries, MA Photography is a concept-driven course dedicated to expanding the boundaries of the photographic medium.

This year, the show features work by Ji Sun Choi, whose project ‘In Case’ is an installation of suitcases and photographs that explore human anxiety.

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‘In Case’, Ji Sun Choi, 2014.

Devoid of functionality, the presented objects are suggested as means of dealing with and surviving the symptoms of anxiety provoked by our daily environment.

At the same time, depicted hands and gestures point, grip, hold and take – engaging with the world through the prophylactic object.

22nd February 2014

‘Covering the Carpet’, Jocelyn Allen, 2014

In ‘Covering the Carpet’ and ‘Your Dedication Worries Me a Little’, Jocelyn Allen explores the body, performance and representation.

‘Covering the Carpet’ is a response to the scrutiny of the female body, particularly the pubic region. In a series of nudes, Jocelyn is seen contorting, balancing and stretching her body into poses which conceal this area.

‘Your Dedication Worries Me a Little’ is an ongoing collection of over 1000 self-posted YouTube videos in which Jocelyn dances and/or mimes to songs on her webcam. Jocelyn describes this as “an exercise in trying to not care what people think about me” and is interested in what people say about others online.

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‘Your Dedication Worries Me a Little’, Jocelyn Allen, 2014.

Yukihito Kono investigates photography in various formats from installation to performance and publication in ‘244’.

Fragments of black and white images of waves pinned onto the wall create a vast space of meditation and interpretation between the image and its viewers, visualising how people relate to and affect each other.

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’244′, Yukihito Kono, 2014.

The work also raises the question: where is the presence of a photograph?

This fantastic work and much more is on show from Tuesday 25 November, so don’t miss the chance to come and explore for yourself.

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’244′, Yukihito Kono, 2014.

School of Media: MA Documentary Film, MA Photography, PGDip Photography Portfolio Development
Exhibition open: Tuesday 25 November-Monday 1 December
Private View: Tuesday 25 November 6-9pm
RSVP to Private View
MA Photography Symposium: Tuesday 25 November 11am-4pm
Late night opening: Thursday 27 November until 9pm

Read more about MA Photography

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Welcome to Postgraduate Shows 2014

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Our spectacular Postgraduate Shows 2014 are just around the corner and below are the key dates and times for this year.

We can’t wait to celebrate the work of our talented postgraduate students as they prepare to become the future of the creative industries, and we hope to see you there!

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Postgraduate Shows 2013. Image © Ana Escobar

School of Media: MA Documentary Film, MA Photography, PGDip Photography Portfolio Development
Exhibition open: Tuesday 25 November-Monday 1 December
Private View: Tuesday 25 November 6-9pm
MA Photography Symposium: Tuesday 25 November 11am-4pm
Late night opening: Thursday 27 November until 9pm

School of Media: MA Sound Arts (Angus-Hughes Gallery, Hackney, E5 0PD)
Exhibition open: Tuesday 2 – Sunday 7 December
Private View: Monday 1 December 7-9pm
Symposium: Sunday 7 December 2pm
Performances: Sunday 7 December 7pm

School of Design: MA Contemporary Typographic Media, MA Graphic Branding and Identity, MA Graphic Design, MA Graphic Moving Image, MDes Service Design Innovation, PGCert/PGDip Design for Visual Communication
Exhibition open: Monday 8 – Saturday 13 December
Private View: Tuesday 9 December 6-9pm
Late night opening: Thursday 11 December until 9pm

School of Media: MA Photojournalism & Documentary Photography
Exhibition open: Wednesday 7 – Thursday 15 January 2015
Private View: Thursday 8 January 6-9pm
Late night opening: Wednesday 14 January until 9pm

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Postgraduate Shows 2013. Image © Ana Escobar

RSVP to the Private Views

Visit our Postgraduate Shows 2014 page

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MEAD Scholarship recipient hosts first solo show – Dead Cat Bounce

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Light Eye Mind are excited to present Dead Cat Bounce, the UK debut solo show by Alice Woods.

Woods, a final year student studying BA Fine Art at Central St Martins, is a recent recipient of the prestigious Mead Scholarship and is without a doubt, one to watch out for in the future. Woods is concerned with the implications of economic and financial systems that highlight the complex relationships between the powerful and the powerless, particularly since the explosion of the Occupy movement and the effects of the 2008 global recession in Woods’ home region of North East England.

Through in-depth research, Woods sets out to address the UK’s economic knowledge deficit and elucidate the relationships between cultural and economic decision-making.

Dead Cat Bounce is a thoughtful and eye-catching contribution not only to the art world, but also to the wider public.

Date: 15 – 29 Novemeber 2014
Location: Light Eye Mind, 176 Blackstock Road, London
Cost: Free

For more information, visit – www.lighteyemind.com

 

Review // LCC turned Inside Out

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‘Framing the Elephant’ at LCC. Image © Filip Bigos

The LCC Graduate School was proud to host a series of events recently as part of the Inside Out Festival 2014. Ranging from a pop-up drawing event to a documentary film screening, the events brought students, the public and industry experts together in celebrating London’s vibrant culture.

Photography PhD student and MA Photojournalism and Documentary Photography graduate Zephie Begolo reports.

Monday saw the pop-up drawing event ‘Framing the Elephant’, which was run by Grace Adam, who teaches design at LCC and across UAL. The window of LCC’s Typo café was turned into a canvas as frames were stencilled onto the glass – not permanently! – and people were invited to draw what they could see outside.

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‘Framing the Elephant’ at LCC. Image © Filip Bigos

They washed the images off after photographing them and started again. This created a buzz in the café and saw lots of people, from arts to journalism and business students, picking up their Posca pens and giving it a go.

Grace, who specialises in working with spaces we build and negotiate, said: “We’ve had all sorts of people giving it a go. It’s all about getting people to draw who don’t normally draw and getting them to take a few minutes to really notice and appreciate their environment.”

That evening, Professor Lawrence Zeegen, Dean of the School of Design at LCC, presented his new book and accompanying exhibition ’50 Years of Illustration’.

Taking the audience on a personal journey through the world of illustration, Professor Zeegen also charted the past five decades in the industry, from the psychedelic idealism of the ’60s to the stylised, overblown consumerism of the ’80s, right through to the beginning of the 21st century.

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Attendees explore ’50 Years of Illustration’. Image © Filip Bigos.

He shone light on professionals who have created some of the most iconic images across the generations, noting work that has been of social and political importance and demonstrating how illustration through the decades has been informed by and represented the social zeitgeist.

A preview of the exhibition followed the talk and included an impressive array of familiar illustrations. Coinciding with the beginning of a new MA in Illustration at LCC, this event was a celebration of the subject’s rich and colourful history.

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‘Is Silver Surfing the Solution for Social Isolation?’ panel debate. Image © Filip Bigos.

On Tuesday an expert panel gathered in the Main Lecture Theatre to discuss the topic ‘Is Silver Surfing the Solution for Social Isolation?’. LCC’s own Amanda Windle, DigiLab Fellow, presented research that has been conducted into people’s relationship with technology over the age of 65 and discussed a new app aimed at getting more people engaging with social media.

The debate was chaired by Sarah Johnson of the Guardian and she was joined by Thomas Giagkoglou, Course Leader BA Media Communications; Tim Burley, Development Director of artsdepot; Marcus Green, Research Manager at AgeUK and Michele Fuirer, Artist and Specialist in Learning – Public Programmes at the Tate.

The panel discussed the increase in feelings of isolation among the older generation and how these might be counteracted through arts and technology initiatives that could build social networks.

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Richard Wilson talks to William Raban about ’72-82′. Image © Filip Bigos.

Lastly, Thursday saw the screening and interview ’72-82: Richard Wilson in conversation with William Raban’. The film ’72-82′, which brings together rare archive footage, interviews and images of the first decade of the groundbreaking London arts organisation, Acme, was created by LCC’s Professor of Film William Raban.

He worked in conjunction with Wilson, who went on to become a renowned sculptor following his time at Acme. The film provided a fascinating insight into the lives and community of the thriving arts scene in London and the ways in which artists were supported by Acme, and given the opportunity to work and create, who otherwise might not have been able to survive in London.

In the discussion following the screening, Wilson described the sense of freedom that was afforded to the Acme artists in taking over derelict buildings in the East End and often incorporating them into their artwork, creating a unique mode of expression for all the artists involved.

Professor Raban emphasised his love of the capital and how it is an extraordinary breeding ground for inspiration and creativity, which leads him to continue to make films about the city.

Watch the discussion between Raban and Wilson //

The Inside Out Festival, which is curated by the Culture Capital Exchange in association with Times Higher Education, aims to shine a light on the contribution of London’s universities to the vibrant creative culture of the capital.

Words by Zephie Begolo

Read more Research at LCC

Read more about the LCC Graduate School

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1914 Now films launch on SHOWstudio

1914 Now: Film Inculabuna

1914 Now: Film Inculabuna

Four fantastic films that draw together curatorial talents and film making ingenuity today launched on SHOWstudio, bringing to a global audience the 1914 Now exhibition which is currently on at Spazio Punch in Venice.

1914 Now, four perspectives on fashion curation is a film installation which figures a collaboration between LCF academics and other renowned artists and curators.

Curators, Walter Van Beirendonck, LCF’s Amy de la Haye, Kaat Debo, and LCF’s Judith Clark (Course leader MA Fashion Curation) were invited by Alison Moloney (LCF Curator, International Exhibitions Programme) to express a moment in fashion or dress from 1914. Rather than working in familiar museum contexts, they explored the potential of film as a medium, revealing their perspectives on one year of fashion and on fashion curation. To do this, the curators have collaborated with filmmakers including Bart Hess, James Norton, Katerina Athanasopoulou and Marie Schuller.

The project was inspired by Rem Koolhaas’s brief to the national pavilions in the Giardini of the Venice Architecture Biennale Absorbing Modernity 1914 to 2014. Alongside the films is a catalogue, which will be available on the UAL e-store, containing essays from the curators and responses from architectural historians and practitioners, which explore how moments of modernity in fashion collide with those of other disciplines.

Make sure to explore these intriguing and wonderful responses to a moment in time on SHOWstudio.

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