Archive for the ‘Exhibitions’ category

PhD researcher, Idit Nathan talks about her current show at Standpoint Gallery

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The exhibition FOOTNOTES PLAYING DEAD is Idit Elia Nathan’s (PhD candidate at CSM) first solo show. It opened at Standpoint Gallery in London on the 15th January and will run till 14th Feb 2015.

Footnotes Playing Dead is the culmination of 5 years of practice-based research titled Art of Play in Zones of Conflict, which explores the intersections between the seemingly unrelated phenomenons of play and conflict.

The exhibition title takes its cue from the opening lines of Günter Grass’ famously controversial poem What Must Be Said, which considers personal and collective responsibilities in times of adversity and interminable conflict. The title also reflects on children’s games and certain theatrical demonstrations in the West Bank and Gaza as well as more recently here in London, where people pretend to be dead in order to highlight the way in which children and innocent civilians are targeted by one of the most powerful armies in the world.

Tell us about the work you are showing in Footnotes Playing Dead and why did you choose this work?

The artworks are all playful and interactive because I wanted to create participatory experiences in which the viewers are invited to “play with” and explore for themselves the complexities of conflicts, which as stated by Artist Simon Leung

‘…even if we do not live under the direct threat of war’s violence, we understand ourselves in relationship to the state-sanctioned killing of others, elsewhere, in our time, and at times in our name’.

I included three projects which are central to my research and which I wanted to concentrate in one space. For example Seven Walks in a Holy City which explores Jerusalem, the city I grew up and left more than twenty years ago is explored through walks of varying length, thematic foci and staring points, all determined by cards and dice. Following the walks I produced seven series of postcards, which are on display and available for purchase. Another project called Hegemonopoly/Machsompoly is an adaptation of the classic monopoly game to reflect on the landscape of Israel Palestine with its wealth of settlements as well as checkpoints and where freedom of movement and restrictions on it are not equal to all, as those playing in the gallery soon find out. In Painting the City Golden or a Leaf from Tansy’s Book the gallery visitors are invited to ‘colour in’ their own version of one of the city’s most iconic tourist sites.

There are other games such as a triptych of HAND MADE MEMORY GAMES where all the cards are made out of black and white photos from different parts of the world as well as from a variety of historical times with subject matters ranging from Aerial Bombs in the first to Checkpoints and Refugees inthe second and third, making it tricky to win. And there is my first inkjet print Invisible Cities Series, No. 1 and my first artists book Please watch ur head, published with marmalade publishers of visual culture so its a very varied show.

It has been particularly interesting to get all the artworks of recent years into one space and it was great to site the work at Standpoint gallery, with its intimate and evocative features such as the lift with its heavy metal mesh doors. The opening event included a raffle of postcard paintings which will be sent out to the winners once the show comes down. So far I have had some excellent feedback and with two discussion events planned it promises to be a busy and interesting month for me.

Why did you choose CSM for your PhD studies, and how did you find the experience? (how has studying for a PhD developed your work)

When I started considering the possibility of embarking on a research project to contextuaise work that was loosely tied together a friend pointed me in the direction of my now supervisors Pam Skelton and Professor Anne Tallantire. I knew and admired their work and was delsighted when they offered me a place. They were then joined by Caterina Albano and I now have an amazing team of supervisors, each contributing from their own perspective so its proved to be a very rich experience so far. There is no doubt that the research has impacted positively on the work I have made in ways that I am still in the process of reflecting on and I hope will be articulated in the thesis itself. It seems to have made me more reflective and I’d like to think a better writer too. In terms of the work produced I think it has benefited from the contextual research and hopefully become richer and more rigorous.

How do you juggle being a PhD student and practitioner?

It is a challenge and I have given up on trying to find the perfect balance – it just doesn’t exist. Some weeks/months are dedicated to making work and others to writing and the word juggling is the right one in this context. I make work, sometimes relating to the thesis, at others less so, and then it feels like I will never manage to write about it or get back to the thesis and then it can be quite the opposite – making the work – means that some of the thoughts fall much more easily onto the page and find their way into the thesis. As fluxus’ score says ‘you never quite know.’

For further information:

 

LCC announces major photography, sound and moving image exhibition ‘Staging Disorder’

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Opening on Monday 26 January and curated by Christopher Stewart and Esther Teichmann, ‘Staging Disorder’ explores the contemporary representation of the real in relation to modern conflict.

The project is initiated and supported by Karin Askham, Dean of the School of Media.

The exhibition includes selected images from seven photographic series that were made independently of each other near the start of the new millennium:

Adam Broomberg and Oliver Chanarin’s ‘Chicago’, Geissler/Sann’s ‘personal kill’, Claudio Hils’ ‘Red Land Blue Land’, An-My Lê’s ’29 Palms’, Richard Mosse’s ‘Airside’, Sarah Pickering’s ‘Public Order’ and Christopher Stewart’s ‘Kill House’.

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’747 Heathrow’, Richard Mosse

These artists portray fake domestic rooms, aircraft, houses, streets and entire towns designed as military and civilian mock-ups in preparation for real or imagined future conflicts across the globe. Their work asks questions about the nature of truth in current photographic practice.

The images in all seven series are documentary images of something which appears real but has in fact been staged to mimic a disordered reality.

In capturing this constructed reality, the works explore modern, premeditated conflict, and analyse a unique form of architecture.

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‘High Street’, Sarah Pickering

The ‘Staging Disorder’ concept refers not to how the photographers have staged disordered reality themselves, but rather to how they have recognised and responded to a phenomenon of staging that already exists.

These themes are also extended throughout the LCC gallery spaces in work by sound artists from UAL’s Creative Research into Sound Arts Practice (CRiSAP) research centre.

CRiSAP artists Cathy Lane, Angus Carlyle (and his collaborator, the anthropologist Rupert Cox), David Toop and Peter Cusack add a multi-dimensional element to the photographic works with sound and moving image installations and written texts.

The show coincides with a symposium on the afternoon of Tuesday 27 January and a book launch at 6pm of the publication ‘Staging Disorder’ by Black Dog Publishing, co-edited by Christopher Stewart and Esther Teichmann.

Staging Disorder
Private View: Tuesday 27 January 6-9pm
Exhibition open: Monday 26 January – Thursday 12 March
Opening times: Monday-Friday 10am – 5pm, Saturday 11am – 4pm, Sunday closed
RSVP for Private View
Venue: London College of Communication, Elephant & Castle, London SE1 6SB.

#stagingdisorder

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LCC Postgraduate Shows 14 // Spotlight on MA Photojournalism and Documentary Photography

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‘Abide with Me’, Andy Barmer, 2014.

Kicking off 2015 at LCC – with a Private View on Thursday 8 January – is our final Postgraduate Show of the season, featuring work by thirty-three talented postgraduate students from MA Photojournalism and Documentary Photography.

In this year’s show, ‘Consider This’, we see how Rwanda is making a new history through competitive cycling, picture the private lives of Iranian women differently, view a mythical interpretation of Galicia, northern Spain, and explore how history is recorded and remembered via the story of an unresolved plane crash.

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‘X-Ray’, Betty Zapata, 2014.

Work also includes Betty Zapata’s undercover project ‘X-Ray’, which reveals how public hospitals in Venezuela are locked in their own emergency.

‘X-Ray’ shows from the inside the decomposition of public healthcare facilities and the suffering of vulnerable patients as the country undergoes huge political and economic crisis.

The constant realities of poverty, violence, internal political conflicts, corruption, negligence and abandonment are found to be present both within the walls of public hospitals and within the borders of Venezuela itself.

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‘Abide with Me’, Andy Barmer, 2014.

Andy Barmer is showing ‘Abide with Me’, a fourteen-minute film short and four-minute dual screen looped video installation exploring three generations of one family – daughter, mother and grandfather – and the influence of the past upon the present.

Daughter Beth travels to France, Yorkshire and Scotland to explore her grandfather’s traumatic Great War history, and psychological issues are shown to resonate down the generations.

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‘And the Mountain Said to Munzur: You, River of My Tears’, Miriam Stanke, 2014.

In ‘And the Mountain Said to Munzur: You, River of My Tears’, Miriam Stanke presents the story of Dersim, a remote mountainous area of Eastern Anatolia with the Munzur river and valley at its heart.

Dersim is the historical heartland of the Kurdish Alevis, a heterodox religious group that has suffered a long history of oppression and violence and continues to fight for its heritage.

The project captures glimpses of a society whose cultural and religious history reveals itself not only in special prayers and rites but in clear political actions towards autonomy and equality.

LCC Senior Lecturer Max Houghton introduces ‘Consider This’:

“Photography’s ability to create or extend discourse is not yet utilised fully in our sophisticated culture; its use more frequently associated with instant, devourable satisfaction, as defined by the unsavoury neologism ‘click-bait’.

“The gentle invitation, then, to look longer; to consider, may be the most radical act you could engage in today”.

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‘Not a Blank Canvas’, Joshua Irwandi, 2014.

School of Media: MA Photojournalism and Documentary Photography

Exhibition open: Friday 9 – Thursday 15 January 2015
Private View: Thursday 8 January 6-9pm
RSVP to Private View
Late night opening: Wednesday 14 January until 9pm

Read more about MA Photojournalism and Documentary Photography

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LCC alumna reveals lives of hospice patients in new exhibition

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Jade Sempare, 31, was diagnosed with MS at the age of 13. She told Eléonore about how her house keys represented living independently from her mum.

MA Photojournalism and Documentary Photography alumna Eléonore de Bonneval has recently been working with patients at St. Joseph’s Hospice, Mare Street, Hackney, to create a series of intimate portraits capturing the most important objects in their lives.

Launched to coincide with Hospice Care Week, Eléonore’s ‘Everlasting Lives’ exhibition features photographs of objects selected not for their materialistic value but for the personal and emotional stories attached.

St Joseph’s Hospice is one of the oldest and largest hospices in Britain, founded in 1905. It is an independent charity providing compassionate support and care for people with life-limiting conditions and terminal illnesses in Hackney and the City of London, Newham and Tower Hamlets.

Speaking at the exhibition opening, Eléonore said:

“I want to thank St Joseph’s Hospice staff and patients for their support and trust throughout this project.

“Jade, Sanjay, Lucie, John, Josie, Susan and Viviane told me about their life stories, we identified together five objects that mattered to them, but really those objects don’t matter.

“What do matter are the stories attached. Through those you’ll get a window into their lives, hear about their trips, favourite books or music and most importantly you’ll hear about the essential role played by their beloved friends and family.”

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John Waterhouse’s photograph of his dad

John Waterhouse, 77
Diagnosed with blood cancer in January 2013

My dad
I was born the wrong time, 1937. I didn’t see my father. I don’t remember seeing my father until I was 8 years of age. It wasn’t a normal upbringing because my mother was in the hospital. She had TB. She died at 32. I was 9.

I was about 8 years of age when my dad came back, he was like a stranger because I had not seen him at all really. I remember he came in, he gave us a little jar of sweets and went round the pub. I still remember that day. I don’t know what sweets it was in those days, everything was rationed.

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Toys belonging to Susan Murray’s children

Susan Murray, 52
Diagnosed with MS on January 18, 2008

‘Eric the Sheep’ and ‘Stripey Zebra’, my children’s teddy bears.
I had my first kid Alfy, now 15, when I was 38 and Jake, now 12, when I was 40. The only thing I didn’t do is travel to South America, which is the next place I wanted to go to. But I had the kids instead.

My life has completely changed since I had the kids. It does. They are really important to me.

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Perfume bottle belonging to Viviane Fatimani’s grandmother

Viviane Fatimani, 29
Diagnosed with MS in December 2009

The scent of my French grandmother
My grandmother died last year at Christmas, two days before we came to visit but I think it was on purpose because she always made me promise I would be at her funeral. When I was living in Mexico, sometimes she said ‘you will come back for my funeral right?’ ‘Yeah of course I will Mémé !’.

I have kept her perfume because it smells of her. It is Cinema by Yves Saint Laurent. I can’t believe she used to bath herself in this stuff. I used to think that it was just what she used to smell of. I didn’t realize it was perfume. My aunt told me ‘you should take the perfume’.

I took it to my sister and I said: ‘Close your eyes, smell this, what is it ? What does it smell of?’ She said, ‘it smells of Mémé!’

‘Everlasting Lives’ continues at St Joseph’s Hospice until Friday 16 January 2015 and is open every day 9am-6pm.

Read more about MA Photojournalism and Documentary Photography

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LCC Postgraduate Shows 14 // Spotlight on MA Graphic Design and MA Graphic Moving Image

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‘Skim Scan Read Copy / Rec. Live’, Cleber De Campos, 2014.

Our School of Design Postgraduate Show opens officially with a Private View on Tuesday 9 December from 6-9pm. To celebrate, here’s the last in our preview series, putting a spotlight on two courses with really exciting work on display.

This year MA Graphic Design students have been inspired by a diverse range of subjects from pornography to pedagogy, and their work explores the many facets of the design process from in-depth research to experimentation.

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‘Blink’, James Buell, 2014.

Students exhibiting this year include James Buell, whose project ‘Blink’ takes a sideways look at the future of the news. ‘Blink’, a bold electronic product, caters to a future customer so addicted to headlines and gossip that truth and accuracy carry little importance.

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‘Blink’, James Buell, 2014.

This random headline generator, with an inbuilt algorithm, sources key words and phrases from a wide variety of online platforms and merges them together. Future headlines include ‘Taylor Swift Detained after Shooting in Ottawa’ and ‘Boris Johnson Beheaded by Ed Miliband’.

Cleber De Campos presents ‘Skim Scan Read Copy / Rec. Live’, a project that investigates the process of mutual influence that newer and older media have over each other.

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‘Skim Scan Read Copy / Rec. Live’, Cleber De Campos, 2014.

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‘Skim Scan Read Copy / Rec. Live’, Cleber De Campos, 2014.

The end result is a hyper-mediated zine that discusses contemporary subjects such as surveillance, information overload, life-editing and copy.

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‘Skim Scan Read Copy / Rec. Live’, Cleber De Campos, 2014.

MA Graphic Moving Image students have explored a broad range of screen-based communication designs throughout their studies, from traditional moving image such as animation, documentary, narrative shorts and broadcast design to web content, projection and video mapping.

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‘The Hadron and the Higgs Installation’, Kalai Yung, 2014.

‘The Hadron and the Higgs Installation’, a piece by Kalai Yung, aims to explain the concept behind the Hadron Collider experiment and the Higgs Boson at CERN. Driven by a desire to simplify complex ideas, Kalai’s work investigates how effective video mapping can be.

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‘The Hadron and the Higgs Installation’, Kalai Yung, 2014.

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‘The Hadron and the Higgs Installation’, Kalai Yung, 2014.

Yang Guo has used his own experience of suffering from air pollution in China in 2013 to produce ‘Stop Repeating’, an animated film that promotes engagement with environmental causes. Drawing parallels between the ‘Great Smog’ of London in 1952 that killed 12,000 people and China’s current air pollution crisis.

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‘Stop Repeating’, Yang Guo, 2014.

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‘Stop Repeating’, Yang Guo, 2014.

Come along to the huge School of Design show to see this and much more work by our talented graduating students!

School of Design: MA Contemporary Typographic Media, MA Graphic Branding and Identity, MA Graphic Design, MA Graphic Moving Image, MDes Service Design Innovation, PGCert/PGDip Design for Visual Communication
Exhibition open: Monday 8 – Saturday 13 December
Private View: Tuesday 9 December 6-9pm
RSVP for Private View
Late night opening: Thursday 11 December until 9pm

Read more about MA Graphic Design

Read more about MA Graphic Moving Image

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LCC Postgraduate Shows 14 // Spotlight on MDes Service Design Innovation and PGDip/Cert Design for Visual Communication

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Emma Collum, 2014.

In the latest preview of next week’s School of Design Postgraduate Show, we take a look at what’s in store from three more exhibiting courses.

MDes Service Design Innovation looks at design from a strategic perspective, working with different disciplines and exploring research methods and processes for service design sectors.

In a unique interdisciplinary course, students develop and apply their design thinking to a range of societal and business challenges.

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Natira Wongpaitoon, 2014.

Natira Wongpaitoon’s project aims to raise awareness of Thailand’s community-based tourism (CBT), which aims to include and benefit local people.

CBT introduces travellers to traditional cultures and customs, with part of the tourism income set aside for projects which benefit the community as a whole.

The goal is to boost tourism by collaborating with Localalike, a start-up positioned between communities and visitors.

Natira has researched Localalike’s strengths and weaknesses and investigated customers’ behaviour in relation to technology and tourism.

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Thais Maio, 2014.

Thais Maio has looked at urban mobility in Bristol, prompted by the difficulty and frustration caused by heavy traffic, infrequent and confusing public transport services and hilly terrain.

The project proposes a better service from the city’s buses, not only making life easier for current users but improving perceptions of the service by the general public, potentially attracting new travellers and reducing traffic.

Thais explains: “Good public transport is a crucial factor in permitting democratic access to city spaces, as vulnerable groups can become isolated if they don’t have access to affordable and good quality public transport.

“Increasing bus usage also can attract more investment to the network, connecting more people and changing the way some groups relate to the city.”

Postgraduate Certificate and Diploma Design for Visual Communication students gain practical skills and expand their knowledge of design principles, historical and contemporary contexts, research methodologies and theory with both the part-time Postgraduate Certificate and full-time Postgraduate Diploma.

The programme explores visual language, typography, colour and information design through set and self-initiated projects.

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Emma Collum, 2014.

Emma Collum’s work involves mixing traditional techniques such as letterpress and linocut printing with digital elements. In her major project, she redesigns a charity shop, challenging why charities spend huge sums on other campaigns  but often neglect their stores.

Keen to access the potential that the shops have to inform and engage, Emma tried to move away from the traditional cluttered and chaotic image and create something new and fun.

She used letterpress and combined this with bright colours, animal characters and footprints to create an exciting customer experience.

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‘Happenings’, Kim Yeandle-Hignell, 2014.

Also exhibiting is Kim Yeandle-Hignell, who has produced two publications: ‘Autoimmune & Diet’, about diets currently used to battle the symptoms of autoimmune diseases, and ‘Happenings’, about Elephant & Castle’s colourful pedestrian subway.

Prompted by the possibility of a redesigned roundabout which involves removing the subway, ‘Happenings’ is an A3 memento of this underpass and its heritage, gathering together memories, feelings, thoughts and opinions from those who use it.

Come along to the huge School of Design show to see this and much more work by our talented graduating students!

School of Design: MA Contemporary Typographic Media, MA Graphic Branding and Identity, MA Graphic Design, MA Graphic Moving Image, MDes Service Design Innovation, PGCert/PGDip Design for Visual Communication
Exhibition open: Monday 8 – Saturday 13 December
Private View: Tuesday 9 December 6-9pm
RSVP for Private View
Late night opening: Thursday 11 December until 9pm

Read more about MDes Service Design Innovation

Read more about PGCert Design for Visual Communication

Read more about PGDip Design for Visual Communication

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LCC Postgraduate Shows 14 // Spotlight on MA Contemporary Typographic Media and MA Graphic Branding and Identity

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Rossouw Oosthuizen, MA Contemporary Typographic Media, 2014.

We’ve had a fantastic time celebrating the achievements of students from the School of Media during the past couple of weeks, and now it’s time to look ahead to the School of Design show opening very soon.

The School of Design postgraduate courses have been brought together in one place with the show opening on Monday 8 December, with a Private View on Tuesday 9 December from 6-9pm.

First up in our preview series is MA Contemporary Typographic Media, which explores the relationships that exist between visual communication and language.

Looking at word and image, message and audience, type and typography, students research their own areas of interest, develop practical and critical skills and become creative visual communicators.

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Rossouw Oosthuizen, MA Contemporary Typographic Media, 2014.

Students graduating this year include Rossouw Oosthuizen, whose project looks at the objects that we use every day and tries to understand how they affect our lives.

Rossouw focuses particularly on the idea of the ticket, and attempts to demonstrate ways in which the ticket can be used to add value to our travel experiences.

“In this everyday object lies a great number of opportunities to bring functional and emotional resonance to our everyday lives,” Rossouw explains.

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Test print ‘Heavy Metal Typographies’, Marie Eyries, MA Contemporary Typographic Media, 2014.

Also exhibiting is Marie Eyries, who has investigated Music Typologies & Typographies: Language and Type in Record Covers of Heavy Metal and Electronica.

Marie analyses and documents the visual cues and grammar of typography in music design. The visual presentation of this data highlights how typography in album art leads the listeners and consumers to the music.

All Marie’s independent projects have centered on this crossroads between music and design, and she aims to become a designer of album artwork after graduating from LCC.

The School of Design show also features MA Graphic Branding and Identity, which challenges the meaning of graphic branding itself.

Driven by intelligent enquiry and evaluation, students explore the strategic thinking underlying brands and look at how that strategy can drive creative expression.

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Nireesha Prakash, MA Graphic Branding and Identity, 2014.

Students include Nireesha Prakash who has been looking at how our deadline-driven work environments challenge us to be fast, but risk making us lose perspective in the process, taking a toll on our health, work and relationships.

Nireesha’s final project examines slowness and ways of encouraging philosophies of slowness – connection, focus, health and relaxation – in the workplace, specifically the banking industry.

Nireesha’s brand ‘Slowup’ aims to make the best performers better by challenging the cult of speed.

The brand uses secrecy and exclusiveness in response to the psychology of bankers.

An interwoven calendar depicts each hour of the month, and the only way to use it is to unwind the thread connecting the hours one page at a time (see above). Another calendar uses the capillary action of ink to slowly reveal a message.

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‘Haze’, Giulia Lunardi, MA Graphic Branding and Identity, 2014.

Also showing work is Giulia Lunardi, whose project ‘Haze’ explores how social media negatively interact with the urban environment and change our perception of it.

Finding that a change of perspective helped her relate to urban spaces in a more relaxed and enjoyable way, Giulia created a small kit encouraging them to see how ironic seeing the world through a filter can be.

‘Haze Sightseer’ symbolises our point of view, limited to a five-inch screen. ‘Haze Memo’ represents the multitude of social media messages we receive every day but is also a detox aid, and ‘Haze Filter-it Kit’ humorously underlines the oddness of looking at the world through a lens rather than experiencing it directly.

If you want to directly experience this incredible School of Design show, catch it before Saturday 13 December.

School of Design: MA Contemporary Typographic Media, MA Graphic Branding and Identity, MA Graphic Design, MA Graphic Moving Image, MDes Service Design Innovation, PGCert/PGDip Design for Visual Communication
Exhibition open: Monday 8 – Saturday 13 December
Private View: Tuesday 9 December 6-9pm
RSVP for Private View
Late night opening: Thursday 11 December until 9pm

Read more about MA Contemporary Typographic Media

Read more about MA Graphic Branding and Identity

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MA Photography alumna features in ArtGemini Prize 2014 at Singapore Art Fair

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‘Stars 8′, Ellie Davies, 2014. (Source material credit: STScI/Hubble & NASA).

MA Photography alumna Ellie Davies (2008) has scooped 1st Prize Photography in the ArtGemini Prize 2014.

The annual ArtGemini Prize is a celebration of international contemporary art for emerging and estalished artists around the world.

Ellie’s winning work ‘Stars 8′ (pictured above) is part of her recent ‘Stars’ series, in which she explores her desire to balance a relationship with the wild places of her childhood and a sense of disconnection from the natural world.

The work is a response to the experience of gazing at landscapes as a tourist, while living in urban or semi-urban areas, which often alienates viewers from the scene in front of them.

‘Stars’ attempts to address both the mystery and material sensuality of our landscapes and interposes photographs of ancient forests with images of the Milky Way, Omega Centauri, the Norma Galaxy and Embryonic stars in the Nebula NGC 346.

The ArtGemini Prize is showing this month at the Singapore Art Fair, where Ellie has been selected to exhibit alongside two other artists from the 2014 Shortlist, Jaykoe and Adrian Scicluna.

The Singapore Art Fair runs from Thursday 27 – Sunday 30 November 2014 at The Suntec Singapore Convention & Exhibition Centre, Suntec City, Singapore.

The ArtGemini Prize can be found at Booth D10, so we hope that any of our readers who are in town will stop by to take a look!

Read more about MA Photography

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LCC Postgraduate Shows 14 // Spotlight on MA Sound Arts

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‘Found Composition’, Gilda Manfring, 2014

The second of our Postgraduate Shows 2014 – featuring MA Sound Arts – is just a few days away, and we’ve had a sneak preview of the work on show.

MA Sound Arts is an intensive, specialised course which gives students the chance to develop their conceptual and contextual understanding of sound arts in practice and theory, while tapping into the Creative Research into Sound Arts Practice (CRiSAP) research centre.

Each of the twelve students on the course has developed their own individual approach and built a distinctive portfolio – so what can we expect to see at Hackney’s Angus-Hughes Gallery this year?

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‘Found Composition’, Gilda Manfring, 2014

Gilda Manfring’s ‘Small pieces loosely joined’ is a journey of research and investigation resulting in a body of experimental scores and sound compositions.

The work is collected in a self-published book and CD and partially presented in the wall of the gallery, and unfolds as a collection of accidental discoveries rather than the execution of an idea.

Gilda’s practice is based in experimental electronic composition, using and re-using sounds mainly found in invisible places like the internet or her mind, with improvisation and spontaneity at the core of her process.

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‘#HLMB / He Loves My Body’, Dan Helgi Helgason í Gong, 2014.

‘#HLMB / He Loves My Body’ by Dan Helgi Helgason í Gong seeks to question the assumptions we make about people through voice, looks and gestures.

This sound and visual piece draws inspiration from contemporary dancers and pop lyrics written about sexual adoration from a woman to a man, and how this kind of adoration is much less prominent when it comes to men in pop music who identify as gay.

Dan Helgi sets out to critique the heteronormative world of pop by exploring gender-norms as well as making a critique of ourselves as judges.

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‘Seeing with Ears’, Jamie Lu, 2014.

Jamie Lu’s video walk ‘Seeing with Ears’ takes the audience on a tour of London’s West End, based on his own relationship with the area.

Jamie has spent most of his spare time in the West End this year and is passionate about its theatres and their work. In creating this piece he gave his emotional responses to this part of London a shape, and transformed them into sound, expressing feelings that could not be articulated in speech.

His intention is that ‘Seeing with Ears’ will give those who are familiar with the West End a new point of view while newcomers receive an introduction to the district via Jamie’s own experiences.

The exhibition will close with a symposium and performance evening on Sunday 7 December. The symposium will focus on the place of research in creative practice, with talks from sound artists Lisa Busby and Mark Peter Wright, as well as contributions from the students and Course Leader Salomé Voegelin, chaired by the exhibition’s curator Irene Revell.

The symposium will also be an opportunity to engage directly with the students’ research.

Following this will be an evening of performance, including works by Tian Bai, Rebecca E Davies (with Holly Jarvis), Gary Fisher and Emre Yağcı.

Below are details of the exhibition and events programme:

Postgraduate Shows 2014: School of Media, MA Sound Arts
Private View: Monday 1 December 7-9pm
Exhibition open: Tuesday 2 – Sunday 7 December
See opening times: www.angus-hughes.com
Late opening: Thursday 4 December until 9pm
Symposium and Performances: Sunday 7 December
RSVP for symposium and performance evening to: Lisa Hall, crisap@arts.ac.uk
Venue: Angus-Hughes Gallery, Hackney, E5 0PD

Read more about MA Sound Arts

Read more about CRiSAP

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Awarded UAL MPhil Maria Christoforatou exhibits in London

Maria Christoforatou graduated earlier this year from CCW with an MPhil, we caught up with her to talk about her experience at UAL and what she has been doing since.

Why did you choose to study your MPhil at CCW? Was it a good experience?

I chose to study at CCW because I was confident in the high academic standards and knowledgeable and experienced tutors. It was challenging and enriching experience throughout.

What was the transition from MPhil researcher to independent practitioner like?

Since finishing my MPhil course, less than a year ago, I had 3 solo exhibitions and several group shows. I feel well equipped to explore and present my ideas and my work. I am ready to dedicate myself to further developing and expand my artistic vision.

How has the MPhil influenced your work and career?

It gave me a deeper understanding of both the theoretical and practical aspects of art. Also the extensive study and research opened doors to better appropriating the various aspects of my practice.  Most of all it gave me confidence in expressing my ideas and putting them into work.

Tell us about the work you are including in this solo exhibition; is it different from your MPhil work?

I am expanding the research that I have undertaken and developing new vision and possibilities for my art work.

Maria Christoforatou: Constructing Spaces

28 November – 30 November 2014
The Chocolate Studios, Flat 21, Shepherdess Place 7, London N1 7LJ
RSVP/contact: kornelia.pawlukowska@gmail.com

The exhibition Constructing Spaces presents new works by London based artist Maria Christoforatou. Christoforatou works across a variety of medium including drawings on paper, installations, sculpture, oil paintings and most recently collage.

Her practice examines the emotional effects of displacement in relation to notions of home as a place of refuge and departure, as well as the ways in which art can expose the effects of forced displacement, making observable such feelings as fear,
pain and loss. It is clear that her own personal experiences from the past, which has seen her lose two homes in fire has had a huge impact on her artistic practice.

Maria Christoforatou Constructing Spaces

Through her research Christoforatou examines critically the relationship between the romanticised notion of home, as a place of safety, security, comfort and belonging, and the emotional and material impact of its loss.

To express this concept, the artist deconstructs architectural and physical elements of a house, that are normally seen but overlooked, such as pipes or scaffoldings, to recreate a variety of pieces. By doing this Christoforatou emphasises that the
concept of a home can be very unstable, precarious and vulnerable reflecting the many changes and insecurities that humans have to face today.

The limited use of colour, the absence of people, the use of subtle lines, juxtaposed with the reproductions of Tudor and Victorian houses, as well as gable houses, are what characterise and distinguish Christoforatou’s work.

About Maria

Maria Christoforatou received her BA (Hons.) in Fine Art from the Athens School of Fine Arts (ASFA) in Greece and her MA in Fine Art from Wimbledon College of Arts, University of the Arts London. Recently she graduated from CCW Chelsea College of Arts, University of the Arts London with an MPhil in Fine Art Practice-based research. As part of her research she has been investigating narratives of home and displacement in contemporary art practice.

She recently had a solo exhibition called ‘Dislocated’ at The Gallery @Idea Store Whitechapel, London, UK (2014) and another called, ‘Un-build’, at the Galeria-Atelier Metamorfose, Porto, Portugal (2013). During her career she has taken part in shows in Greece, UK, Italy, Canada, Germany, The Netherlands and USA, and awarded academic scholarships for her work in Greece (Academy of Athens, IKY). She has also been involved in organizing numbers of workshops in London for Tate Galleries, Barbican, Parasol Unit and The National Gallery as well as in Greece and Italy.

Further information about the artist: