Archive for the ‘Events’ category

The Creative Outlet Festive Pop-Up Shop

_DSC3431

Join us on Thursday 4 December, for one day only, at our festive pop up shop to meet the artists and designers featured in the current exhibition in the UAL Showroom ‘The Creative Outlet’. Buy work directly from the exhibitors alongside work from past UAL Showroom exhibitors and Made In Arts London artists on the day.

From jewellery to greeting cards, art prints to contemporary interior products – buy your unique seasonal gifts from UAL artists and designers, from as little as £2.50!

Drinks and mince pies from 5pm.

The Creative Outlet is open from the 20 October, in the UAL Showroom at High Holborn, and will run until 23 December. All works in the show are otherwise available to buy online.

Review // LCC turned Inside Out

IMG_2681

‘Framing the Elephant’ at LCC. Image © Filip Bigos

The LCC Graduate School was proud to host a series of events recently as part of the Inside Out Festival 2014. Ranging from a pop-up drawing event to a documentary film screening, the events brought students, the public and industry experts together in celebrating London’s vibrant culture.

Photography PhD student and MA Photojournalism and Documentary Photography graduate Zephie Begolo reports.

Monday saw the pop-up drawing event ‘Framing the Elephant’, which was run by Grace Adam, who teaches design at LCC and across UAL. The window of LCC’s Typo café was turned into a canvas as frames were stencilled onto the glass – not permanently! – and people were invited to draw what they could see outside.

IMG_2707

‘Framing the Elephant’ at LCC. Image © Filip Bigos

They washed the images off after photographing them and started again. This created a buzz in the café and saw lots of people, from arts to journalism and business students, picking up their Posca pens and giving it a go.

Grace, who specialises in working with spaces we build and negotiate, said: “We’ve had all sorts of people giving it a go. It’s all about getting people to draw who don’t normally draw and getting them to take a few minutes to really notice and appreciate their environment.”

That evening, Professor Lawrence Zeegen, Dean of the School of Design at LCC, presented his new book and accompanying exhibition ’50 Years of Illustration’.

Taking the audience on a personal journey through the world of illustration, Professor Zeegen also charted the past five decades in the industry, from the psychedelic idealism of the ’60s to the stylised, overblown consumerism of the ’80s, right through to the beginning of the 21st century.

IMG_2801

Attendees explore ’50 Years of Illustration’. Image © Filip Bigos.

He shone light on professionals who have created some of the most iconic images across the generations, noting work that has been of social and political importance and demonstrating how illustration through the decades has been informed by and represented the social zeitgeist.

A preview of the exhibition followed the talk and included an impressive array of familiar illustrations. Coinciding with the beginning of a new MA in Illustration at LCC, this event was a celebration of the subject’s rich and colourful history.

IMG_2859

‘Is Silver Surfing the Solution for Social Isolation?’ panel debate. Image © Filip Bigos.

On Tuesday an expert panel gathered in the Main Lecture Theatre to discuss the topic ‘Is Silver Surfing the Solution for Social Isolation?’. LCC’s own Amanda Windle, DigiLab Fellow, presented research that has been conducted into people’s relationship with technology over the age of 65 and discussed a new app aimed at getting more people engaging with social media.

The debate was chaired by Sarah Johnson of the Guardian and she was joined by Thomas Giagkoglou, Course Leader BA Media Communications; Tim Burley, Development Director of artsdepot; Marcus Green, Research Manager at AgeUK and Michele Fuirer, Artist and Specialist in Learning – Public Programmes at the Tate.

The panel discussed the increase in feelings of isolation among the older generation and how these might be counteracted through arts and technology initiatives that could build social networks.

IMG_2975

Richard Wilson talks to William Raban about ’72-82′. Image © Filip Bigos.

Lastly, Thursday saw the screening and interview ’72-82: Richard Wilson in conversation with William Raban’. The film ’72-82′, which brings together rare archive footage, interviews and images of the first decade of the groundbreaking London arts organisation, Acme, was created by LCC’s Professor of Film William Raban.

He worked in conjunction with Wilson, who went on to become a renowned sculptor following his time at Acme. The film provided a fascinating insight into the lives and community of the thriving arts scene in London and the ways in which artists were supported by Acme, and given the opportunity to work and create, who otherwise might not have been able to survive in London.

In the discussion following the screening, Wilson described the sense of freedom that was afforded to the Acme artists in taking over derelict buildings in the East End and often incorporating them into their artwork, creating a unique mode of expression for all the artists involved.

Professor Raban emphasised his love of the capital and how it is an extraordinary breeding ground for inspiration and creativity, which leads him to continue to make films about the city.

Watch the discussion between Raban and Wilson //

The Inside Out Festival, which is curated by the Culture Capital Exchange in association with Times Higher Education, aims to shine a light on the contribution of London’s universities to the vibrant creative culture of the capital.

Words by Zephie Begolo

Read more Research at LCC

Read more about the LCC Graduate School

The post Review // LCC turned Inside Out appeared first on London College of Communication Blog.

Journalism Guest Speaker Review // So You Want to Be a Travel Journalist

Peter Grunert 2

Peter Grunert of Lonely Planet Traveller spoke to students about his career in travel journalism.

In the third of a series of Journalism Guest Lectures, LCC welcomed Peter Grunert, editor of the world’s best-selling travel magazine Lonely Planet Traveller. Second-year BA (Hons) Journalism student Max Gayler reports.

Lonely Planet Traveller is in its sixth year after Peter ended up convincing Lonely Planet’s owner to start it up and make him editor. After only a year the magazine spread to India and Argentina and now has publications in 12 different countries.

It would be easy to assume that the magazine would work off the back of the success of hugely successful television shows such as ‘Six Degrees’ or ‘Globe Trekker’, but Peter displayed exactly why the magazine deserves its own credit.

The lecture featured Peter’s favourite piece that the magazine has ever published: the ‘Across the Planet’ project carried out by staff writers Oliver Smith and Christa Larwood.

“We sent two writers across the world from London to Sydney, following in the footsteps of Tony and Maureen Wheeler who were the founders of Lonely Planet 41 years ago,” Peter explained.

This impressive piece of journalism broadcast contrasts in culture from learning to yodel in Germany to the Mudmen of Papua New Guinea.

Oliver Smith, one of the writers of the project, had originally gained his staff writing job after completing work experience at the magazine. During this time he pitched a feature retracing the steps of Lawrence of Arabia, which was so successful that he was named the UK’s Young Travel Writer of the Year.

“We’d never normally give this kind of budget to anybody who wasn’t an experienced writer but we just loved this idea so much we had to do it,” Peter told us.

Peter also highlighted the importance of photography in travel journalism, stating: “Photography is the thing we think draws people in the most… It’s probably the thing people connect with most easily”.

For this reason all photography for the magazine is freelance in order to open up the possibility of a plethora of different landscapes, experiences and people. “We look for photography to fuel people’s dreams,” added Peter.

On the subject of how each country’s edition decides on its content, Peter explained: “All our editions tend to welcome a real diversity of experiences and locations… If their readers tend to be people who live in big cities we encourage them to explore their massive and very diverse countries”.

As well as travelling the world and working his way through his bucket list, Peter has also had the opportunity to interview his idol David Attenborough.

Peter went into detail on his conversation with the country’s most-loved wildlife expert, retelling the story of the time David Attenborough woke up to find an amorous male giant tortoise getting a little too close to his igloo tent on the Galapagos Islands.

What does the future hold for LPT? Peter told us that video is the next step for the magazine, telling of a video he made last February where he went to a rhino conservation centre in Kenya and had to look after a blind, adolescent rhino named Alfie.

“It was a brilliant experience and video is something we can create on all our trips. We’re in the midst of moving our magazine’s videos onto our YouTube channel.”

LPT offers great opportunities for young journalists with constant internships rolling in and out of the office the whole year round, as well as providing chances for greater things, with Oliver Smith a perfect example.

The overall impression given by the magazine’s editor is that travel journalism is, if you’re lucky enough to break into it, one of the most satisfying and rewarding jobs in the world.

It’s obvious that even now, Peter is incredibly appreciative of the opportunities he’s been given and more than happy to help someone get on the same track as him.

Words by Max Gayler

View the programme of Journalism Guest Speaker events

Read about BA (Hons) Journalism

The post Journalism Guest Speaker Review // So You Want to Be a Travel Journalist appeared first on London College of Communication Blog.

Fashion Graduate Brings Bengal Dream to London

Bengal Dream by Rahemur Rahman (photo © catwalking.com)

Bengal Dream by Rahemur Rahman (photo © catwalking.com)

This month, menswear designer Rahemur Rahman is showing his graduate collection ‘Bengal Dream’ in Tower Hamlets — the same London borough where a community arts project first fired up his desire to study fashion.

Old photographs of his parents provided inspiration for Rahemur’s work, which draws heavily upon his Bangladeshi heritage. Dazed Digital describes the collection as “gossamer suiting for fantasy Far East business trips”.

To create his designs, Rahemur experimented with traditional weaving, knitting and screen printing techniques. The final fabrics were then produced in the village of Mirpur in Bangladesh. Rahemur wanted to show that the country can be a sustainable and ethical manufacturer of fabrics, despite disasters like Rana Plaza.

The collection is accessorised with bags, sunglasses and shoes, all made by Rahemur. He used spray paints to colour traditional shoes and soft leather bags in vibrant gold, pink and peach hues.

Bengal Dream by Rahemur Rahman (photo © catwalking.com) Bengal Dream by Rahemur Rahman (photo © catwalking.com) Bengal Dream by Rahemur Rahman (photo © catwalking.com) Bengal Dream by Rahemur Rahman (photo © catwalking.com)

Passing on his knowledge
Rahemur gained his love of fashion and textiles through a project run by A-Team Arts, a youth organisation Central Saint Martins works with to help widen participation. He went on to study BA Fashion at the College and has interned with Louis Vuitton in Paris.

Throughout his time at Central Saint Martins, Rahemur was a student ambassador for our Widening Participation team. He continues to share his experience with children and young people who might not otherwise consider coming to the College, and will be running school workshops as part of his exhibition.

He notes: “Without Widening Participation I wouldn’t be the designer I am today, graduating from BA Fashion Menswear at Central Saint Martins. If it wasn’t for the constant support from Central Saint Martins Widening Participation staff, I don’t think I would’ve even made it to my final collection.”

You can catch Rahemur’s exhibition at the Brady Arts Centre until 30 November 2014.

Bengal Dream by Rahemur Rahman (photo © catwalking.com) Bengal Dream by Rahemur Rahman (photo © catwalking.com) Bengal Dream by Rahemur Rahman (photo © catwalking.com) Bengal Dream by Rahemur Rahman (photo © catwalking.com)

More information:
- BA Fashion
- Widening Participation

The post Fashion Graduate Brings Bengal Dream to London appeared first on Central Saint Martins: News.

Fashion Graduate Brings Bengal Dream to London

Bengal Dream by Rahemur Rahman (photo © catwalking.com)

Bengal Dream by Rahemur Rahman (photo © catwalking.com)

This month, menswear designer Rahemur Rahman is showing his graduate collection ‘Bengal Dream’ in Tower Hamlets — the same London borough where a community arts project first fired up his desire to study fashion.

Old photographs of his parents provided inspiration for Rahemur’s work, which draws heavily upon his Bangladeshi heritage. Dazed Digital describes the collection as “gossamer suiting for fantasy Far East business trips”.

To create his designs, Rahemur experimented with traditional weaving, knitting and screen printing techniques. The final fabrics were then produced in the village of Mirpur in Bangladesh. Rahemur wanted to show that the country can be a sustainable and ethical manufacturer of fabrics, despite disasters like Rana Plaza.

The collection is accessorised with bags, sunglasses and shoes, all made by Rahemur. He used spray paints to colour traditional shoes and soft leather bags in vibrant gold, pink and peach hues.

Bengal Dream by Rahemur Rahman (photo © catwalking.com) Bengal Dream by Rahemur Rahman (photo © catwalking.com) Bengal Dream by Rahemur Rahman (photo © catwalking.com) Bengal Dream by Rahemur Rahman (photo © catwalking.com)

Passing on his knowledge
Rahemur gained his love of fashion and textiles through a project run by A-Team Arts, a youth organisation Central Saint Martins works with to help widen participation. He went on to study BA Fashion at the College and has interned with Louis Vuitton in Paris.

Throughout his time at Central Saint Martins, Rahemur was a student ambassador for our Widening Participation team. He continues to share his experience with children and young people who might not otherwise consider coming to the College, and will be running school workshops as part of his exhibition.

He notes: “Without Widening Participation I wouldn’t be the designer I am today, graduating from BA Fashion Menswear at Central Saint Martins. If it wasn’t for the constant support from Central Saint Martins Widening Participation staff, I don’t think I would’ve even made it to my final collection.”

You can catch Rahemur’s exhibition at the Brady Arts Centre until 30 November 2014.

Bengal Dream by Rahemur Rahman (photo © catwalking.com) Bengal Dream by Rahemur Rahman (photo © catwalking.com) Bengal Dream by Rahemur Rahman (photo © catwalking.com) Bengal Dream by Rahemur Rahman (photo © catwalking.com)

More information:
- BA Fashion
- Widening Participation

The post Fashion Graduate Brings Bengal Dream to London appeared first on Central Saint Martins: News.

Maker culture converges on LCC

LCC_Mini_Maker_Faire_06_07_2013__by_Ana_Escobar_077

Mini Maker Faire 2013. Image © Ana Escobar.

The Elephant & Castle Mini Maker Faire, now in its second year at London College of Communication, is a celebration of the ever-expanding and contemporary maker culture.

Held on Saturday 15 November, the Maker Faire represents makers (and even bakers) working with a variety of technologies and designs including a 3D printed cookie cutter (Einstein cookies, anyone?), a paper speaker that plays sweet music and a crowd-sourced, environmental monitoring system called Smart Citizen, which publishes open data.

cookie cutters

Exhibits include a 3D printed cookie cutter.

The maker movement continues to build momentum as a community, with more people turning their backs on traditional models of thought and design in favour of hacktivation.

“EdTech and the maker movement go hand in hand. The best thing we can do to help children master technology, rather than being mastered by it, is to help bring the maker movement into more schools,” explains Ben Pirt, creator of a DIY robot for kids.

Paper Playscapes VandA

‘Paper Playscapes’ in progress. © V&A

The Faire will also include an interactive artwork specially commissioned by the Victoria & Albert Museum for the event. Paper Playscapes is an open-ended installation – interacted with and made by designers and visitors – representing a landscape in movement.

Over 100 exhibitors are involved and over 2,000 attendees are expected at the Faire this year. LCC’s in-house makers are seeing a marked connection between their courses, the culture at the College and the maker movement.

“An era of user-generated content in the digital domain has fostered a desire for the co-creation of products and services and a desire to reshape our physical products to suit new and personal uses,” says Ben Stopher, Programme Director Interactive & Visual Communication.

“In this context, the Elephant and Castle Mini Maker Faire brings together interaction and communication design students with hackers, crafters, tinkerers, biohackers and technology advocates for a day of hands-on fun for all ages.”

Read more about this year’s Mini Maker Faire and book tickets

Visit LCC’s Mini Maker Faire page

The post Maker culture converges on LCC appeared first on London College of Communication Blog.

The Homeless Film Festival at LCC

homeless film festival

Between Tuesday 4 and Friday 14 November, London College of Communication will play host to an eclectic range of free film screenings as part of The Homeless Film Festival, returning to LCC for its second season.

The screenings are open to everyone but booking is essential.

The festival is dedicated to confronting and presenting homeless issues and screens high-end films from around the world, all of which have homeless issues as a central theme or are made by homeless creatives in a mixture of genres.

LCC BA (Hons) Film Practice Joint Course Leader Polly Nash works with festival organisers Dean Brocklehurst and Jamie Rhodes to coordinate LCC’s screenings, with many LCC students helping out on a voluntary basis.

Screenings //

there once was an island

Tuesday 4 November
6.30pm
There Once Was an Island
In this feature documentary, three people in a unique Pacific Island community face the first devastating effects of climate change, including a terrifying flood. Will they decide to stay with their island home or move to a new and unfamiliar land, leaving their culture and language behind forever?

fisher king

Friday 7 November
6pm
The Fisher King
A screening of Terry Gilliam’s classic ‘The Fisher King’, even more poignant after the tragic suicide of Robin Williams. A former radio DJ, suicidally despondent because of a terrible mistake he made, finds redemption in helping a deranged homeless man who was an unwitting victim of that mistake.

theanswertoeverything

Monday 10 November
7pm
The Answer to Everything + Q&A
Rupert Jones and Emma Bernard skilfully mix performances from Streetwise Opera’s homeless and ex-homeless performers with a handful of professionals including renowned soprano Elizabeth Watts to create a rich and characterful 40-minute film. A member of Streetwise Opera will take questions from the audience after the screening.

parked

Wednesday 12 November
6pm
Parked
In this Irish drama starring Colm Meaney and Colin Morgan, Fred lives a quiet, isolated life in his car, having lost all hope of improving his situation. That all changes when he forms an unlikely friendship with Cathal, a dope-smoking 21-year-old with a positive attitude, who becomes his ‘neighbour’.

the unloved

Friday 14 November
6.30pm
The Unloved + Q&A
British drama ‘The Unloved’ is the directorial debut by acclaimed actress and Homeless Film Festival patron Samantha Morton. Lucy is eleven years old. Having been neglected by her estranged mother and father, she is placed in a children’s home. Star Molly Windsor and producer Kate Ogborn will answer audience questions after the film.

View the full programme

Read about BA (Hons) Film Practice

Visit the Homeless Film Festival website

The post The Homeless Film Festival at LCC appeared first on London College of Communication Blog.

Journalism Guest Speaker Review // The VICE Vision of Journalism

IMG_1819

VICE’s Bruno Bayley gave the second talk in this year’s LCC Journalism Guest Speaker series. Image © Diana Tleuliyeva

On Tuesday 21 October, LCC welcomed Bruno Bayley, European Managing Editor of VICE for the second lecture in the Journalism Guest Speaker series. Third-year BA (Hons) Journalism student Diana Tleuliyeva reports.

Bayley’s lecture on the VICE vision of journalism was hotly anticipated by many – the audience ranged from UAL to City University and even Bristol University students. Everyone was intrigued to get an insight into the most provocative magazine in the country.

Since the time of its establishment in the UK in 2002, VICE magazine has undergone a lot of changes. It’s gone from being a magazine “hated for its humour” to being innovative in the way news and pop culture is covered.

“A part of my job is to make the magazine better without making it a different magazine. So, it’s about balancing, keeping that tone and the things people liked about it but actually improving the quality of it: better writers, better photographers,” said Bayley.

Bayley believes the video content on VICE has helped massively to change people’s perceptions about the magazine. A recent documentary about the Islamic State is one example.

“When I started working at VICE, there were only a few serious articles, but now we have documentaries and even a news channel. A lot of people will be surprised how VICE has changed.”

IMG_1815

A packed Main Lecture Theatre for Bayley’s talk. Image © Diana Tleuliyeva

VICE is known for championing the “immersionist” school of journalism and Bayley stressed this throughout the lecture: “I’d rather commission a story when someone says ‘I’m going to go to this place and do this’ rather than pieces written from a removed situation. Be immersive as much as possible.”

So, how do you get a job at a publication like VICE? Bayley recommends being proactive and useful in the workplace and doing as much work as possible.

“A lot of the journalists were interns who did well and then became regular contributors, usually progressing from the online version and then writing longer features for the magazine.”

Internships are advertised online throughout the year, giving opportunities to work for one of ten channels. Bayley himself started by writing reviews and conducting vox-pops for VICE in 2007.

Good engaging ideas are a part of the magazine’s DNA. Bayley explained: “We like to cover things that either other people haven’t covered hugely, that people wouldn’t read about elsewhere, or cover a story in a slightly different way.”

Many still accuse VICE of being too biased in comparison to the mainstream media. Obviously, objectivity is the goal of any serious publication and VICE is not an exception:

“We try to be unbiased. For example, in the Syria issue, we had an article written from Syria by pro-regime and rebel people. It’s a good example to show that we try to be as representative as possible, showing different sides.”

Founded as a fanzine in Montreal in 1994, VICE now distributes a free monthly magazine in multiple languages in 29 countries. Its ten vertical content channels cover various topics from food to technology.

In 20 years, VICE has become a global success, engaging millions of young people across the world.

Words by Diana Tleuliyeva

View the full Journalism Guest Speaker series

Read a review of ‘BBC News and the Digital Future

Read about BA (Hons) Journalism

 

The post Journalism Guest Speaker Review // The VICE Vision of Journalism appeared first on London College of Communication Blog.

Creative Enterprise Awards shortlists announced!

Creative Enterprise Awards_1306x653 (1)

 

University of the Arts London will be celebrating the enterprising successes of our students and recent graduates at the fifth Creative Enterprise Awards.

42 students and graduates from across University of the Arts London colleges have been shortlisted from hundreds of applications.

Winners will be announced at the Creative Enterprise Awards Night on 19 November.

The seven award categories are:

  • Freelancer
  • New Business
  • Enterprising Project
  • Digital
  • Ethical or Social Enterprise  
  • International
  • Enterprising Individual

We’ll also be announcing four Creative Enterprise College Awards.

Check out this year’s shortlist.

The awards take place as part of Creative Enterprise Week and are sponsored by NatWest.

Research // Grace Adam draws a crowd

big draw setting up

Preparing for The Big Draw. Image © Grace Adam

On Monday 20 October, students, staff and passers-by were treated to an exciting pop-up drawing session in the Typo cafe by LCC lead design tutor Grace Adam as part of Inside Out Festival 2014.

Grace’s event, ‘Framing the Elephant’, invited people to stop, look and draw, taking 10 minutes or half an hour to create a fast, fun drawing of the view from inside the College.

The highlight of #framingtheelephant - a part of #lccgradschool! #nofilter

Instagram @fbigos

A brilliant drawing by @jhartley95 at @lcclondon #framingtheelephant

Instagram @fbigos

Grace has also recently appeared on ‘Daily Brunch with Ocado‘, demonstrating a few fun and unusual ways to get drawing.

Watch the video here [starts 26:59]

Speaking about her wider involvement in ‘The Big Draw’, a national festival of drawing with events held around the country, Grace told presenters Tim Lovejoy and Simon Rimmer:

“The Big Draw was set up to get people re-engaged with drawing, having fun, and connecting to the world in a different way [...] I think it’s considered a childish thing to do, and we communicate with text. Drawing is not taken so seriously, which is a shame. It’s essential.

“I think everybody is obsessed by ‘getting it right’ and getting it to look like the real world, but your drawing will be different from my drawing. You express yourself as an individual and that’s important.

“Drawing is a pleasure, drawing is a way to look at the world, to communicate, to experiment, to explore. It’s a good thing and we’re losing it.”

If you’ve missed out this year, however, some of Grace’s own sculptural work is on show until Friday 31 October in ‘Modes of Remembrance’ at St Giles-in-the-Fields, exploring and responding to the idea of monuments and memorials within the church.

Read Grace Adam’s staff profile

Read more about Research at LCC

The post Research // Grace Adam draws a crowd appeared first on London College of Communication Blog.