Archive for the ‘Exhibitions’ category

Fashion Textiles Graduate sells unique designs at Secret Garden Party Festival

Nicole Parkauskas, BA (Hons) Fashion Textiles

Nicole Parkauskas, BA (Hons) Fashion Textiles

BA (Hons) Fashion Textiles graduate, Nicole Paskauskas, has won a £500 scholarship to bring her unique jewellery pieces to the Secret Garden Party Festival. We caught up with the new graduate, whose work was seen on the LCFBA14 Runway, to find out what festival goers can discover on her stall…

LCF News: So how did this all come about?

Nicole Paskauskas: I’ve been going to Secret Garden Party Festival for about 4 or 5 years now so being a massive fan of the secret emporium tent I always wanted to get involved with them. The festival were offering scholarship places for stalls worth £500 and since the tickets were completely sold out I thought, now is the perfect time to apply!

LCF: And what will you be selling at the festival?

NP: My jewellery has come about through a natural progression – I sold it at LCF’s College Shop, and it was also featured on the BA14 Runway. It’s jewellery made using the same braiding techniques that I developed during my final year at LCF. Selling it on stalls was just the next step towards starting to develop my brand.

For the stall I’ve recycled off cuts of old furniture and scraps of wood and painted them white to build a sculpture that I can hang my braided jewellery from. I had no money to spend on proper stands so it really forced me to put some thought into it!

LCF: We also hear that you’re involved in the In the Woods Festival?

NP: In The Woods Festival is going to be quite an experiment! I have been invited to collaborate with a sculptor in building the main stage so I am excited to apply my work in a totally different way to fashion or jewellery. This festival is also sold out and will be held in Kent at the end of August. I’m also really excited to see who will be performing at the festival as it’s a secret!

LCF: What’s next?

NP: I am currently working on developing wearable jewellery and have been overwhelmed by the response from the press since my final collection of headpieces and body jewellery in June. In September I hope to be developing a second collection of pieces for my brand so stay tuned!

The post Fashion Textiles Graduate sells unique designs at Secret Garden Party Festival appeared first on LCF News.

LCC students’ projects selected by Intel for Digital Summer Trip 2014

Pupils on crossing

Visiting pupils interact with the ‘Musical Crosswalk’ project

Two projects by MDes Service Design Innovation and MA Interaction Design Communication students were recently selected by Intel to be exhibited in their tent at Digital Summer Trip 2014.

The projects resulted from a three-week exploratory design project between LCC students and technology giants Intel, focused on new opportunities to adopt and seamlessly integrate environmental sensors into daily life.

The students worked with sensors monitoring noise, light, proximity and air quality, developing prototypes and service scenarios for future applications.

They began with the following questions:

  • How can citizens be empowered to change their daily practices and to engage with the environment in new and different ways?
  • How can a non-professional public become empowered to generate knowledge about their environmental conditions?
  • How can Internet of Things (IoT) objects be configured and designed to repair a broken world?
  • What opportunities are there through IoT devices to develop cultural exchanges by gathering information from different regions and countries relating to community/environmental challenges?

Group of three

Pupil having demo

Standing demo

Above: LCC students demonstrate their work at Digital Summer Trip 2014

Finished projects ‘EcoFurby’ and ‘Musical Crosswalk’ were chosen as they fitted well with the playful nature of Intel’s other exhibits at the Digital Summer Trip technology show, which took place from 3-5 July at east London’s Tech City.

The event was aimed at educators and secondary school students, and the video below shows pupils interacting with ‘Musical Crosswalk’, designed to encourage pedestrians, and particularly young people, to cross the road safely:

Read about MDes Service Design Innovation

Read about MA Interaction Design Communication

The post LCC students’ projects selected by Intel for Digital Summer Trip 2014 appeared first on London College of Communication.

POSTGRADCHAT with Vyara Zlatilova

To celebrate Camberwell College of Arts Postgraduate Summer Show 2014 this week until the 23rd July, we’ve met with students and graduates to talk about their work and future plans.

MA Illustration Vyara Zlatilova designs and illustrates thought-provoking Mother’s Day cards with an anti-abuse message

vyara_Do you Love me mother

CCA: What has your experience at Camberwell been like?

Quite inspiring, I met so many amazing people. What’s most interesting is that each of my classmates has their own unique way of working and approaching a project.

CCA: What did you find was the most valuable technical skill you have learnt whilst studying at the college?

First of all, I developed my digital skills quite a lot during the past year. Basically, before the course, digital illustration was one of my main weaknesses, but since it is a really important part of the industry, I intentionally forced myself into improve in that direction. In doing so, I am really happy that I got a lot of support from my tutors, who encouraged me to push myself and develop my potential further.

Also, until recently, I wasn’t comfortable with using colour at all. My work before the course was mainly monochrome and I was terrified by the idea of mixing colour, because I simply couldn’t understand how it works. So, I am really amazed by how fast I managed to improve in this particular aspect of my work as well.

vyara_detail2

CCA: Please tell us about your degree show work?

Since I have a graphic design background, I decided to design and illustrate an advertising campaign against child abuse. Thus, my degree show work is a collection of Mother’s Day greeting cards, which, through provocative abuse related messages, are raising questions regarding the issue of abuse within the family.

I am really interested in the idea of changing the meaning of an image by adding text and subverting the message it communicates to the viewer. For me it was important to attract the audience to the project instead of repelling it by using disturbing images. Therefore, the artworks I produced are aiming to be as visually appealing as possible and to communicate the idea metaphorically rather than directly.

vyara_detail4

CCA: What are your plans after you graduate?

I am currently planning to go back to graphic design and hopefully pursue a graphic design/branding career. However, I would definitely try to develop my illustration style further because, in my opinion, the experience I now have as an illustrator gives me a new perspective into graphic design and could play a valuable role in my further development as a creative professional.

vyara_detail (2)

CCA: Any advice for future MA students?

Collaborate and apply for as many competitions, awards and contests as you can. One year is a really short period of time and sometimes it’s hard to balance university projects with outside-college activities, but, if you manage to do it, it can change your way of working drastically, so push yourselves to the limit and if you’re organized and motivated enough you’ll improve really fast.

More about Vyara @ https://www.behance.net/vzlatilova

Instagram  and on Twitter @VyaraZ

Research // William Raban’s ‘Beating the Bridges: Richmond to Dartford’ at Museum of London Docklands exhibition

Beating the Bridges still

Still from ‘Beating the Bridges: Richmond to Dartford’ by William Raban. 11’ 15”, 16mm/video, colour, 1998.

‘Beating the Bridges: Richmond to Dartford’ by filmmaker and LCC Professor of Film William Raban is showing in a film installation as part of the Museum of London Docklands’ current ‘Bridge’ exhibition.

The free exhibition, which draws on the museum’s art collections to consider the significance of bridges within the London landscape, is open now until Sunday 2 November.

As well as exploring how London’s bridges allow people to experience the city, the show looks ahead to projects such as Thomas Heatherwick’s ambitious ‘Garden Bridge’ proposal, playing with the ideas of destination and crossing and tackling the key debates surrounding London and its bridges.

William’s 1998 film follows the Thames from the wealthy suburbs of west London, past the familiar landmarks of Chelsea, Westminster and the City, to the industrial flatlands beyond Dartford Bridge.

The 30 bridges spanning this stretch of the river provide acoustic spaces filled on the film’s soundtrack by ambient reverb and a live percussion score.

‘Beating the Bridges’ is presented in its own screening room within the gallery and will show continuously every day.

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‘Beating the Bridges: Richmond to Dartford’ installed at Museum of London Docklands

Read more about Research at London College of Communication.

The post Research // William Raban’s ‘Beating the Bridges: Richmond to Dartford’ at Museum of London Docklands exhibition appeared first on London College of Communication.

POSTGRADCHAT with Valeriya N-Georg

To celebrate Camberwell College of Arts Postgraduate Summer Show 2014 this week until the 23rd July, we’ve met with students and graduates to talk about their work and future plans.

MA Printmaking Valeriya N-Georg investigates the representation of the invisible through fragments of the physical body

 MA Printmaking Valeria N_Georg

CCA: What has your experience at Camberwell been like?

VN: I really enjoyed my two years at Camberwell. The first year I spent experimenting and playing with all the printmaking techniques trying to find something unique and original that I would fall in love with using the amazing workshops. And the second year I concentrated working with my newly born technique and my subject of work, listening to the tutors advice.

CCA: Please tell us about your work

VN: The subject matter of my work is the ultimate mystery of the relationship between the physical human body and the inner self (or the human spirit). Within my practice I am investigating the representation of the invisible through fragments of the physical body. I am interested in exploring the boundaries between the inner and outer body; between the physical and metaphysical; tangible and intangible, by exploring the tactile and the optical image.

MA Printmaking Valeria N_Georg

CCA: What are you showcasing in your degree show?

VN: The works I am creating and showcasing are monotype prints on a gel medium presented on a light box, thus combining media and pushing the boundaries of printmaking. The light box presentation illuminates the ink print made upon the gel surface and conveys a sense of a medical forensic examination on the surgeon’s table. I am showcasing a sculpture and large-scale digital collage prints as well, all made from my monotype prints on layered gel.

MA Printmaking Valeria N_Georg

CCA: What was your inspiration?

VN: I am inspired mostly by scientific and medical sources such as neuroscience and consciousness studies, but also from philosophy and theology. Spending many hours in museum collections about the human body has played a big role in the development of my art too.

MA Printmaking Valeria N_Georg

CCA: What are your plans after you graduate?

VN: First, I will continue creating work in my studio and apply for exhibitions nationally and internationally. My main aim is to get in touch with institutions like the Wellcome Trust and the Hunterian Museum, as I would like to apply for residencies there. To get in touch with scientists interested in collaborations with a visual artist like me is also one of my ambitions.

CCA: Any advice for fellow  students?

VN: Focus on your subject as early as possible and use the very helpful advice from the tutors, and especially from the course leader Johanna Love. She is amazingly supportive and helpful.

More about Valeria @ www.valeriya-n-georg.com

POSTGRADCHAT with Yuanying Cai

To celebrate Camberwell College of Arts Postgraduate Summer Show 2014 this week and until the 23rd July, we’ve met with students and graduates to talk about their work and future plans.

MA Designer Maker Yuanying Cai encourages us to find beauty within flaw growing crystals

MA Designer Maker Yuanying Cai

CCA: How has your experience at Camberwell been like?

YC: Studying at Camberwell, it felt like a very short time for me, but it was definitely a special experience. The course Designer Maker is not specific only for jewellery, it collaborated with other 3D designs, which make it more interesting. We met with different people working in other aspects of design and learnt new techniques from them. I felt like I was  struggling at first, but I think the critiques from tutors and colleagues really pushed me and helped me to think in depth, and to be more decisive. I see myself now more willing to hear and reflect from discussions.

CCA: Please tell us about your work?

YC: My work talks about the narrative of jewellery. It questions the traditional aesthetic of flawless diamonds. By recreating the “flaws” it encourages people to observe the internal beauty of “flaw-growing crystals” and find the beauty in something that traditionally have been dismissed.

MA Designer Maker Yuanying Cai

CCA: What are you be showcasing in your degree show?

YC: I am showcasing a jewellery work named “Growing flaws”, the pieces are presented like a lab. First you see the crystals with “flaws”, I then use different materials to create a process of alum crystal growing. These materials are presented inside test tubes. The copper jewellery shows the before and after growing processes, as the copper grows thicker, at the end you might not recognize it from its original form.

Yuanying Choi 2 MA Designer Maker Yuanying Cai

MA Designer Maker Yuanying Cai

CCA: What was your inspiration?

YC: My inspiration comes from an experience of observing gemstones under a magnifier and the beautiful patterns (inclusions) inside the gemstones. However, these aesthetics have traditionally been dismissed. In the jewellery stores you often see “flawless diamonds” rather than “inclusion gemstones”.  I started to recreate “flaws” to encourage people’s curiosity about the internal beauty of growing-crystals.

MA Designer Maker Yuanying Cai

CCA: What are your plans after you graduate?

YC: I am planning to have some practical working experience, travelling to different places in China to see lab-growing stones. There is so much to learn about gemstones, probably to take another course on Gemology.

CCA: Any advice for fellow or future students?

YC: You can learn a lot from different tutors and students in the course, but I think it is also important to meet someone outside the course to also inspire you in another way. I also think before you attend the course is better to know what is your intention through the year, make sure to do some research about your study proposal.

More about Yuanying @ www.yuanying.co.uk

Tania Kovats, MA Drawing course leader, publishes new book ‘Drawing Water’

Drawing Water by Tania Kovats, published by Fruitmarket in 2014.

Drawing Water by Tania Kovats, published by Fruitmarket in 2014.

Tania Kovats, artist and MA Drawing course leader, has published a book, Drawing Water, which follows her recent solo exhibition Oceans  at The Fruitmarket Gallery in Edinburgh, earlier this year.  Drawing – both her own and other people’s – is a key part of Kovats’ practice. In 2007, she wrote The Drawing Book (Black Dog, 2007), and she has long been interested in what drawing can do.

Physiographic Diagram, Atlantic Ocean, by Bruce C. Heezen and Marie Tharp, 1957 which features in Drawing Water by Tania Kovats.

Physiographic Diagram, Atlantic Ocean, by Bruce C. Heezen and Marie Tharp, 1957 as featured in Drawing Water by Tania Kovats.

Believing that drawing is a mechanism for exploration as much as a tool for representation, Kovats brings together in the book drawings by map-makers, writers, shipbuilders, whalers, soldiers, sailors, artists, archaeologists, cartographers, scientists, uranographers, engineers and dreamers – a diverse selection united by the sense that in making the drawing they were looking for something.

Spread from Drawing Water by Tania Kovats.

Spread from Drawing Water by Tania Kovats.

A selection of Kovats’ own drawing and writing anchors the book which attempts to construct, in the artist’s words, ‘a portolan, a chart drawn at sea to guide a sailor from one safe harbour to the next’.

Spread from Drawing Water by Tania Kovats.

Spread from Drawing Water by Tania Kovats.

Kovats makes drawings, sculpture, installations and large-scale time-based projects exploring our experience and understanding of landscape. She is best known for Tree (2009), a permanent installation for the Natural History Museum in London; and Rivers, an outdoor sculpture in the landscape of Jupiter Artland outside Edinburgh. This new exhibition focuses on her fascination with the sea.

Find out more about Tania’s work at University of the Arts London on her research profile.

There are still places available on MA Drawing at Wimbledon.  To find out how to apply before the deadline 18th August 2014, please visit our course pages.

The post Tania Kovats, MA Drawing course leader, publishes new book ‘Drawing Water’ appeared first on Wimbledon College of Arts Blog.

POSTGRADCHAT with Jingyun Shu

To celebrate Camberwell College of Arts Postgraduate Summer Show 2014 this week and until the 23rd July, we’ve met with students and graduates to talk about their work and future plans.

MA Visual Arts Book Arts Jingyun Shu invites audiences to understand the Chinese language system and reproduce their own words

MA Visual Arts Book Arts Jingyun Shu

CCA: How has your experience at Camberwell been like?

JS: It’s being significant for my career and my future, it has opened my eyes to explore the relationship between my artworks and my interests in the area of Fine Arts, more clearly and deeply. What I want to focus on is the field of Visual Arts. The course has completely opened up a new world of arts to me, not only the knowledge I learnt during the course but also how I showcase and market my work.

CCA: What did you find was the most valuable technical skill you learnt whilst studying at the College?

JS: I have been using laser-cutting machine for most of my work this year, which is my favourite technique. I worked with it before during my BA course; however, I had never worked with the machine by myself.  It was a superb opportunity for me to test everything I am interested in and learn a new technical skill.

CCA: Please tell us about your work

JS: The series of artworks that I have made during  this year are about creating personal Chinese characters based on the Five Phases from Taoism, which centres on  3 principles: participatory, interacting and intercommunication. These ideas are about inviting audiences to understand the Chinese language system and reproduce their own words.

MA Visual Arts Book Arts Jingyun Shu

I am interested in making personal Chinese words for telling stories. In Chinese language, it is common to combine the meaning of prefixes and suffixes together to create a story, which in a way is similar as the format of English language. According to the Wu Xing theory, the property of Chinese words could be separated not only as Yin and Yang parts, but also as Five Elements. The decisive factor is the definition of prefixes rather than the meanings of the characters as a whole.

CCA: What will you be showcasing in your degree show?

JS: I am interested in analysing the Chinese language system and exploring its relationship with the English language, because it appears to be full of mysteries for Westerners. For my final show, I made two  Chinese language games, my piece is titled:  Creating, Translating and Conversing. Both games are suitable for any ages.

Game one aims to explore the shape of Chinese words, which is presented by cutting wood frames in correspondence to the changes of word forms. It includes one box of ‘translating’ cards, around 80 script frames and two game playing cases. The viewers are encouraged to choose scripts frames and put them on  the playing case to get a new word formed by their shadow under the light. The new word’s meaning needs to be mixed with the translation of each frame in the cards’ box.

MA Visual Arts Book Arts Jingyun Shu

Game Two contains one Chinese calligraphy dictionary book, one game playing case and one box of Chinese prefixes and suffixes of ‘Five Elements’. The idea of the work is to invite audiences to layout Chinese prefixes and suffixes to obtain a unique word  from the Chinese language system. All the samples scripts I made in the dictionary are to show my perspectives of communication in languages’ making.

MA Visual Arts Book Arts Jingyun Shu

MA Visual Arts Book Arts Jingyun Shu

MA Visual Arts Book Arts Jingyun Shu

CCA: What are your plans after you graduate?

JS: I want to become a window designer for my future career goal after I graduate. I will also continue this project to make a secret Chinese words dictionary in 3D, in order to tell my own thoughts about the Five Elements theory.

‘EYE CONTACT’ Camberwell graduate Peter Hudson’s great vision for the Wellcome Trust

An amazing video installation created by recent Camberwell graduate Peter Hudson will be staring back at you from the windows of the Wellcome Trust’s central London headquarters this summer. ‘Eye Contact’ will occupy the windows of the Gibbs Building on Euston Road for the next year.

The artwork consists of over 650 coloured pixels, lit by over 16,000 LEDs. It uses real footage of the eyes of 68 volunteers staff from the Wellcome Trust and changes over time, displaying the idiosyncrasies of each individual’s gaze. The eyes will be ‘awake’ and active through the day and will close at sunset to ‘sleep’ through the night. Unless, that is, they are woken by a passing pedestrian.

 Peter Hudson

Peter Hudson, says:

Through this installation, I’m exploring how the digital screen mediates the way we consume images and how the emotional content is affected. Eyes are both a symbol of perception and an instantly recognisable human feature, so by presenting them through a heavily pixellated video display, I’m challenging the usually fluid process of recognition. The pixellation leaves enough detail that regular viewers of the installation, such as commuters, should be able to identify the same participants’ eyes recurring throughout the year.

Peter Hudson

The piece was inspired by themes drawn from Wellcome Trust research in neuroscience and perception, and challenges the viewer to consider how our reliance on digital screens has changed the way we interact with images and each other. Close up, the pixels are an abstract mosaic of flickering colours and light, but viewed as a whole the image resolves and a pair of eyes gazing out from the window.

‘Eye Contact’ is the second winning entry from a competition run by the Wellcome Trust in 2014 for students at the University of the Arts London. The first winning piece, ‘View’, by artist and fellow Camberwell graduate Phoebe Argent, was displayed in the window last year.

View by Phoebe Argent

View by Phoebe Argent

Clare Matterson, Director of Culture & Society at the Wellcome Trust, says:

The collaboration between the Wellcome Trust and University of the Arts London has provided a unique platform for talented young artists to draw inspiration from the research areas of image perception, memory and neuroscience supported by the Trust. Peter Hudson’s installation is an arresting piece of art, which challenges us to re-assess our own powers of perception.

 Peter Hudson

The Wellcome Trust Windows Commission is curated by Sigune Hamann, artist and Reader at University of the Arts London and was launched in autumn 2012 as a new platform of collaboration and practise at the meeting point of art, design and science.  The project, entitled ‘The changing perception of images’ was initiated and as an opportunity for students from all levels and disciplines at Camberwell, Chelsea and Wimbledon Colleges of Arts to provoke fresh thinking on aspects of image perception, to engage passers-by and to act as a high-profile showcase for the students’ creativity and new approaches to image research.

More about Peter Hudson on his website

Find out more about studying at Camberwell College of Arts on our course pages.

Images thanks to Wellcome Library, London.

POSTGRADCHAT with Ala’a Beseiso

To celebrate Camberwell College of Arts Postgraduate Summer Show 2014  this week and until 23rd July, we’ve met with students and graduates to talk about their work and future plans.

MA Fine Art Digital Ala’a Beseiso manipulates natural effects through digital technology

MA Fine Art Digital Ala'a Beseiso

The Patience 3

CCA: Tell us about your experience at Camberwell

AB: Studying at Camberwell has been an extremely enjoyable and insightful experience. I learned a lot, and I got the chance to meet new students along with our course directors. I also found a great pleasure in seeing the other students’ amazing artworks.

CCA: What did you find was the most valuable technical skill you learnt whilst studying at the College?

AB: I didn’t know anything about printing, and I never knew I could print on stone tiles! Exploring printing is a core skill that I am planning to consider in the future in my work.

CCA: Please tell us about your work

AB: Throughout my MA course, I have been trying to explore the aesthetics of the natural environment and of natural effects on artificial objects – alongside Arabic calligraphy and Islamic art. I work mainly with acrylics and oils on canvas,  and sometimes natural desert sand  in order to achieve certain effects and rough textures. After completing artwork by hand, I use digital technology to manipulate each piece, adding a variety of effects. Finally I print the digital pieces on stone tiles, then I paint over them, so the final outcome is an over-painted digitally modified tile print.

MA Fine Art Digital Ala'a Beseiso

The Patience 4

CCA: What can we expect in your degree show?

AB: I will showcase 17 pieces of over-painted stone tile prints along with three oil and acrylic paintings.

CCA: What was your inspiration?

AB: The random effects of the process of nature on natural and man-made objects has always been an inspiration for me, and Islamic art with the symmetry, balance, proportion and harmony principles also interest me. All these concepts exist in nature, and certainly contain some kind of visual appeal. The contrast between soft geometrical shapes and symmetry of Islamic art and Arabic calligraphy against the randomness of rough textures of natural effects created by the unconstrained process of nature creates some sort of balance in my art.

CCA: What are your plans after you graduate?

AB: I’m planning to focus on my new approach and develop it further, then showcase my work. I’m also planning to continue studying, by either taking up a new MA course or a postgraduate diploma in my specialty subject area.

CCA: Any advice for fellow or future students?

AB: I advice future MA students to dig into their inner selves and pin point what they are truly interested in. Try to expand their knowledge by learning more about their passions and constantly experimenting will eventually result in a fruitful experience.