Archive for the ‘Exhibitions’ category

TEXTILE TOOLBOX online exhibition

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The TEXTILE TOOLBOX exhibition launches online on 13th November. It is a showcase of ten propositional design concepts inspired by Mistra research into the sustainability of the fashion and textile industry.

The exhibition platform functions as a research and public engagement 
tool formed around TED’s ‘The TEN’ – design strategies for innovative sustainability thinking and action. The exhibition proposes how these strategies can translate technical and scientific research breakthroughs into design concepts. The new products demonstrate the potential for progressing a sustainable fashion system with new materials, processes, applications and business models. The exhibits are a starting point for discussion – provocations, or ‘provotypes’ – showing us how design tools can create entirely new visions for the future of the industry. This unique online platform offers a global audience a glimpse of a sustainable future fashion industry. An industry that ultimately gives the consumer pleasure whilst also giving the planet and its inhabitants absolute consideration.

The final design pieces use a strategic ‘TEN’ approach to create beautiful fashions for style fans to savour, with aesthetics connecting and responding to the scientific research of the MISTRA Future Fashion consortium.

Exhibits:

1. Seamsdress, by Dr Kate Goldsworthy

2. A.S.A.P (Paper Cloth), by Prof Kay Politowicz, Sandy MacLennan (East Central), Dr Kate Goldsworthy, David Telfer (COS) and Dr Hjalmar Granberg (Innventia)

3. Shanghai Shirt by Prof Becky Earley (Research Profile) and Isabel Dodd

4. Inner/Outer Jacket by Clara Vuletich

5. DeNAture, by Miriam Ribul in collaboration with Hanna de la Motte (SP)

6. ReDressing Activism, by Prof Becky Earley, Emmeline Child and Bridget Harvey

7. Smörgåsbord, by Melanie Bowles (Research Profile) and Kathy Round

8. Sweaver, by Josefin Tissingh

9. Fast Refashion, by Prof Becky Earley

10. A Jumper to Lend, A Jumper to Mend, by Bridget Harvey

Resources:

The collaborations with scientists, academics and professionals, have lead to Tool Kits for action, instructions for making, resources for learning, and films to sit back and watch. International training tools and education models will be available from the site as a free download in the final report in June 2015.

Open Call:

We will also invite a global fashion design audience to submit their own sustainable future fashion projects to us, and selected works will be showcased in an open gallery on the site. We also invite reviewers to send us feedback on the exhibition and to contribute to our final project report. Get in touch for the opportunity to be part of this exciting process.

For more information:

Apply for the next UAL Showroom exhibition

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To run in conjunction with London Fashion Week and UAL Green Week, the UAL Showroom will present an exhibition of work that is a Voice for Change. Submissions should creatively challenge the status quo through foregrounding environmental and social equity within fashion. Selected work will be exhibited from January – March 2015.

We are looking for UAL students and alumni to feature in the exhibition:

Work exhibited can include:

  • Design concepts, collections and services based on principles of sustainability applied to fashion or beauty, and fashion accessories (menswear, womenswear, bags, hats, jewellery, footwear, cosmetics etc).
  • Fashion photography or illustration with a demonstrable ethic in terms ofenvironmental and / or social sustainability or story relating to this subject matter.
  • Presentation of a social enterprise operating within fashion and its communities.
  • All submissions must clearly demonstrate your ambition, methods and process undertaken
  • Visually arresting and thought provoking pieces informed by sustainability imperatives

To apply to be part of this exhibition please download the application form below:

The Creative Outlet

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20 Oct – 23 Dec 2014
09:00 to 20:00

The Creative Outlet is an annual showcase of exciting emerging and established talent, selling unique seasonal gift ideas – ranging from innovative jewellery design to contemporary interior products.

The original works on display – designed and produced by University of the Arts London students and alumni – can all be bought directly from the exhibitors, through their online shops, and at our festive pop-up shop on 4 December, where you can meet the artists and designers, and buy their work in person.

Exhibitors: Alex Burgess, Amanda Tong, Anshu Hu, Augusta Akerman, Camilla Brueton, Celia Dowson, Charlotte Day, David Bennett, Edyta Slabonska, Emi Dixon, Emily Carter, Emma Alington, Evdokia Savva, Finchittida Finch, Gaurab Thakali, Jungeun Han, Kolin and William, Nao Creative, Observatory Place, Reiko Kaneko, Richard McDonald, Rob Halhead-Baker, Robbie Porter, Rolfe&Wills, Sarah ‘Kenikie’ Palmer, Soo Kim, Sylvia Moritz and YU Square.

LCC Research Fellow Brad Butler exhibits at Hayward Gallery

Image: Film still from work by Brad Butler and Karen Mirza

Image: Film still from work by Brad Butler and Karen Mirza

Two films by Brad Butler, a London College of Communication (LCC) Research Fellow, feature in Hayward Gallery exhibition MIRRORCITY, open now until Sunday 4 January 2015.

MIRRORCITY explores the effect the digital revolution has had on our experiences. It includes recent work and new commissions by emerging and established London-based artists who seek to address the challenges, conditions and consequences of living in a digital age.

Brad completed a PhD at LCC under supervisor William Raban and has since become a Post Doctoral Research Fellow at the College.

Brad and his creative partner Karen Mirza have been shortlisted for the sixth Artes Mundi Prize, the UK’s biggest contemporary art prize, and will exhibit with other shortlisted artists in Cardiff from 24 October 2014 until 22 February 2015.

UAL Research caught up with Brad to find out more about his current projects.

Tell us about the work you are showing in MIRRORCITY.

I am showing a new work, ‘Everything for Everyone and Nothing for Us’, alongside an existing work, ‘Hold your Ground’. Shown side by side, these two films speak to each other, though there’s a slight awkwardness about their conversation. They are both about languages of protest, and the relationship of the body to protest.

‘Everything for Everyone and Nothing for Us’ is set in a TV studio, where a protester-in-training listens to audio extracts from a political speech by Margaret Thatcher. Having absorbed the sounds, the protester uses movement to exorcise Thatcher’s voice, retraining the body to resist capitalism.

In ‘Hold Your Ground’, the same protester struggles to turn utterances into speech. Her efforts are interrupted by archive footage of protests in Egypt, Northern Ireland and London. Eventually, she manages to pronounce four phonetic phrases reconstructed from Arabic, meaning ‘hold your ground’, ‘Egyptians’, ‘homeland’ (of the earth, of the Nile) and ‘strike’.

The title of ‘Hold Your Ground’ is taken from the pamphlet How To Protest Intelligently. ‘Everything for Everyone and Nothing for Us’ echoes the slogan of the Mexican Zapatista liberation movement, which began its struggle against neoliberalism, exploitation and racist oppression in 1994.

Why did you choose LCC for your PhD studies, and how did you find the experience?

I chose LCC based on the supervisors primarily. William Raban and Elizabeth Edwards understood my project and process. It was, for me, a perfect match of expertise and timing, and before I knew it I was in the programme supported by LCC’s Research department to find funding.

From there it was a great experience and formative for my work. While academia may not suit every praxis, it proved to be a chance for me to go deeper in a supported semi-autonomous way.

The links later on to a post-doctorate have felt natural. So far I have been encouraged and I feel I fit. Basically, over the last 19 years of being an artist I have worked out the hard way how important it is to work with the right people. Even great ideas will become exhausting if that is not a priority.

Brad Butler talks about his research at LCC's Graduate School Festival, May 2014. Image © Lewis Bush.

Brad Butler talks about his research at LCC’s Graduate School Festival, May 2014. Image © Lewis Bush.

Read the original interview in full on the UAL Research pages

Read Brad’s Research profile

Read more about Research at LCC

The post LCC Research Fellow Brad Butler exhibits at Hayward Gallery appeared first on London College of Communication Blog.

LCF Fashion Matters Gala raises money to launch new careers

Image: Alex Maguire, www.alexmaguirephotography.com Image: Alex Maguire, www.alexmaguirephotography.com Image: Alex Maguire, www.alexmaguirephotography.com Image: Alex Maguire, www.alexmaguirephotography.com Image: Alex Maguire, www.alexmaguirephotography.com Image: Alex Maguire, www.alexmaguirephotography.com Image: Alex Maguire, www.alexmaguirephotography.com Image: Alex Maguire, www.alexmaguirephotography.com Image: Alex Maguire, www.alexmaguirephotography.com

Fashion Matters, LCF’s annual gala event which raises money for scholarships and bursaries has this year smashed its target, raising in excess of £85,000. The event which took place on Friday 10 October aims to support  future generations of designers, makers, entrepreneurs, commentators and industry specialists. The success of the evening will result in at least 50 new scholarships and bursaries.

The glittering Gala dinner, held at The Savoy London and sponsored by Shaftsbury PLC and Hogan Lovells, accommodated over 200 guests including designers, entrepreneurs and key fashion business for a unique evening to celebrate British educated fashion and design talent. VIPs included Grayson Perry CBE RA, Soprano Laura Wright, CEO of the British Fashion Council Caroline Rush, Chief Executive of Whistles Jane Shepherdson, Harold Tillman CBE, model Olivia Inge, designer Maria Grachvogel, interior designer Nicky Haslam, TV illusionist Derren Brown, philanthropist Aisha Caan, Made in Chelsea star Mark Francis and TV presenter Cleo Rocos.

After a champagne reception with an exhibition of beautiful work by current London College of Fashion students, the evening kicked off with a welcome speech by Chair of the Fundraising committee Harold Tillman CBE asking guests to “Dig deep … and even deeper” to help LCF surpass last years total of 29 new scholarships which helped launch “29 new careers.” Following Harold Tillman’s opening address Grayson Perry CBE RA took to the stage – beautifully dressed as his female alter-ego Claire.  Grayson had the audience in stitches as well as reminding everyone about the more serious reason for the evening – to raise money for students who might not otherwise be able to afford university education.  He reflected that as a working class boy he had received his art school education for free – and mused how the changes to the funding of Higher Education in the UK was likely to have an impact on those very same working class students.  Will we still have artists and designers in the future from every social background?

“I don’t see the next Alexander McQueen coming from Eton” he commented.

Guests were able to bid on silent auction items including a beautiful dress donated from the personal archive of Giles Deacon (which sold for £700) and a personal tour with Paul Smith in his Covent Garden studio.

As dessert was being served Ed Giddins compered a lively auction with spectacular prizes including Grayson Perry’s ‘Unfashionable Lion’ which went for a staggering £9,500, an exclusive picture of David Bowie generously donated by celebrity photographer Richard Young which sold for £3000, a pair of Tom Ford catwalk show tickets which sold for £1000 and a bespoke ‘Miss Jones’ Stephen Jones hat and a visit to his studio, which raised £1000.

Rounding off a spectacular evening was an exclusive performance by soprano Laura Wright who recently performed at Prince Harry’s Invictus Games.  Laura performed two tracks from her new album ‘Sound of Strength,’ which is currently at Number 11 in the Classical Music Charts.

Overall the evening was a staggering success and we look forward to giving new talent exciting opportunities in the future.

The post LCF Fashion Matters Gala raises money to launch new careers appeared first on LCF News.

Alexander McQueen: Savage Beauty to be curated by LCF Chair in Fashion Curation

LCF Chair in Fashion Curation and Senior Curator of fashion at the V&A, Claire Wilcox is curating Savage Beauty, the exhibition of the work of Alexander McQueen.

Having previously been named the Costume Institute‘s most popular exhibition ever, after having a sell-out run at New York’s Metropolitan Museum of art in 2011, the exhibition is soon to come to London, with a room dedicated to McQueen’s years in the city, as well as the original line-up showcased at the Met. The exhibition will present concepts and themes central to McQueen’s work throughout his career and will capture the dramatic staging and sense of spectacle synonymous with his runway shows.

Alexander McQueen: Savage Beauty runs from 14 March – 19 July 2015.

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Brad Butler, LCC researcher, exhibiting at the Hayward Gallery

Brad Butler

Image: Film still from work by Brad Butler and Karen Mirza 

Two films by Brad Butler, a researcher at London College of Communication (LCC) will be featured in a new exhibition at the Hayward Gallery, called MIRRORCITY from 14 October 2014 to  4 January 2015.

MIRRORCITY explores the effect the digital revolution has had on our experiences. It shows recent work and new commissions by key emerging and established artists working in the capital today, who seek to address the challenges, conditions and consequences of living in a digital age.

A specially produced ‘alternative’ newspaper has been created by Tom McCarthy for MIRRORCITY. The project was conceived as a collaboration between the author and the artists featured in the exhibition. Artists have contributed a diverse and distinctive array of texts and pictures that McCarthy has edited into an otherworldly reading experience.

Brad completed a PhD at LCC with William Raban as his supervisor and has since become a Post Doctoral Research Fellow at the College. Brad along with his creative partner, Karen Mirza have been shortlisted for sixth Artes Mundi Prize, the UK’s biggest Contemporary Art Prize and will be exhibiting in Cardiff from 24 October 2014 and 22nd February 2015. 

Tell us what work you are including in the show, and why did you choose this work?

I am showing a new work, Everything for Everyone and Nothing for Us alongside an existing work, Hold your Ground. Shown side by side, these two films speak to each other, though there’s a slight awkwardness about their conversation. They are both about languages of protest, and the relationship of the body to protest. Everything for Everyone and Nothing for Us is set in a TV studio, where a protester-in-training listens to audio extracts from a political speech by Margaret Thatcher. Having absorbed the sounds, the protester uses movement to exorcise Thatcher’s voice, retraining the body to resist capitalism.

In Hold Your Ground the same protester struggles to turn utterances into speech. Her efforts are interrupted by archive footage of protests in Egypt, Northern Ireland and London. Eventually, she manages to pronounce four phonetic phrases reconstructed from Arabic, meaning ‘hold your ground’, ‘Egyptians’, ‘homeland’ (of the earth, of the Nile) and ‘strike’.

The title of Hold Your Ground is taken from the pamphlet How To Protest Intelligently. Everything for Everyone and Nothing for Us echoes the slogan of the Mexican Zapatista liberation movement, which began its struggle against neoliberalism, exploitation and racist oppression in 1994.

Were you approached by Tom McCarthy and what has it been like working with him?

There is a newspaper edited by Tom accompanying the Hayward Show with work submitted by  all the participants in the exhibition. Tom has then cross edited and retitled the submitted text, pictures or provocations to create something new. Somehow no one has complained, and he has made something more than the sum of its parts. An early draft I saw was very funny.

Why did you choose to study your PhD at LCC? Was it a good experience?

I chose LCC based on the supervisors primarily. William Raban and Elizabeth Edwards understood my project and process. It was, for me, a perfect match of expertise and timing, and before I knew it I was in the programme supported by LCC research department to find funding. From there it was a great experience and formative for my work, while academia may not suit every praxis, it proved to be a chance for me to go deeper in a supported semi autonomous way.

The links later onto a post doctorate have felt natural. So far I have been encouraged and I feel I fit. Basically over the last 19 years of being an artist I have worked out the hard way how important it is to work with the right people. Even great ideas will become exhausting if that is not a priority.

Part of the #inspiringresearch series

Lara Torres, LCF PhD student, exhibiting at ‘The Future of Fashion is Now’ in Rotterdam

Lara_Torres_2011_An_impossible_wardrobe_28

The Future of Fashion is Now 

Exhibition
11 October 2014 – 18 January 2015
Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen, Rotterdam

The fashion artist and practice based researcher at the London College of Fashion Lara Torres is taking part this autumn exhibition at the Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen with her video installation ‘An impossible wardrobe for the invisible’ (2011).This project goes beyond the boundaries of fashion design to rethink the designer’s task and open a discussion about the importance of clothing and the transience of fashion and it is based in the creation of temporary clothes that are produced with the aim of being destroyed; leaving only the ‘memory’ of the pieces in video documentation relating to the ephemeral nature of fashion, also as a metaphor for the quickness of the fashion system today.

The exhibition ‘The future of fashion is now’ presents the future of fashion. A garment that reacts to emotions, lace patterns grown from a plant, fabric that breaks off and fashion that literally zips people together. Taking a critical view of the current fashion system, more than fifty international designers are showing innovative work at the cutting edge of fashion and art. With the latest generation of fashion designers from all over the world and renowned innovators like Viktor&Rolf, Martin Margiela, Hussein Chalayan and Iris van Herpen.

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LCC MA Photography alumni collaborate for Bethnal Green show

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Pablo Antolí, ‘Fractures’, 2014.

Twenty-four graduates from LCC’s MA Photography course are currently preparing to exhibit new works and writings in an exhibition titled ‘Photography as Installation’ at Oxford House, Bethnal Green.

The MA Photography Alumni Group is designed to consolidate the relationship between MA Photography graduating students and its alumni, providing a network and a space to develop projects and exchange ideas.

The show features work by Peter Ainsworth, Pablo Antoli, Magali Avezou, Diane Bielik, Ella Bryant, Teresa Eng, Kate Elliott, Maria Gafarova, Jo Gane, Lydia Goldblatt, Jochen Klein, Richard Kolker, Kevin Newark, Elisa Noguera Lopez, Francesca Marcaccio Hitzeman & Federica Landi, Katja Mayer, Minna Pöllänen, Michael Rodgers, Ian Rudgewick-Brown, Marcello Simeone, Sayako Sugawara, Sara Wellenkamp and Adrian Wood.

Over the last 16 years, the MA Photography course has seen a significant shift towards installations and performativity in 2D, 3D and 4D. This development, in addition to a focus on the materiality of surface, will throw new light on what photography is today.

marcello simeone

Marcello Simeone, ‘The Unity of Perceptual Sensations’, 2014.

Marcello Simeone’s work explores the middle ground between intimate self-questioning and the ordinary, everyday experience. In ‘The Unity of Perceptual Sensations’, Marcello – in a quest for empathy – engages in a series of ‘sychronised’ walks with strangers on a busy street.

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Kate Elliott, ‘The Study of Peter Pan’, 2014

‘The Study of Peter Pan’ by Kate Elliott is part of an ongoing project that aims to capture a person at the point in adolescence between childhood and adulthood, freezing that moment.

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Minna Pöllänen, ‘Wood on trees’, 2014.

Minna Pöllänen’s ‘Wood on trees’ is both a site-specific work and a series of photographs depicting an attempt to restore two dead birch trees in a forest in eastern Finland. By using scraps taken from wooden planks, the decaying tree trunks are covered with a new shell.

The trees’ progress is regularly checked and further additions made, and, due to weathering and occasional vandalism, the restoration never completes.

pablo antoli

Pablo Antolí, ‘Fractures’, 2014.

‘Fractures’ by Pablo Antolí is a project inspired by the geological processes that form mountains, valleys and gorges. By mirroring the sliding forces of the tectonic plates, the photographic prints are pushed, pinched and folded, enhancing the perception of space while disrupting the clarity of photographic representation.

katja mayer

Katja Mayer, ‘Lusus Naturae’, 2014.

In ‘Lusus Naturae’, Katja Mayer plays with the artist’s recurring preoccupation with mythical creatures, mushroom-like growths and themes of repulsion and desire.

Within drawings, sculptures and photographs, abstract sculptural objects resembling protruding growths are juxtaposed with organic material, found objects and painted surfaces. Shapes that recall a body, the insides of a body, cancerous growths or sexual organs evoke a visceral reaction, demanding a physical response.

The exhibition opens on Monday 6 October and runs until Tuesday 14 October.

Private View
Tuesday 7 October
6.30-8.30pm

Meet the Artists
Saturday 11 October
2-4pm

Read more about MA Photography

Visit the ‘Photography as Installation’ Tumblr

Visit the Oxford House website

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“Every kind of cultural and creative history is here” // A chat with Elefest founder Rob Wray

Elefest banner

Elephant & Castle festival Elefest is just days away, celebrating the artistic life of the area for the 12th year running with a packed and eclectic programme of events from Thursday 2 – Sunday 5 October 2014.

We caught up with Elefest director and founder – and LCC alumnus – Rob Wray shortly before this year’s preparations went into overdrive to hear about psychogeography, challenging preconceptions, and saying “Let’s just do something!”

Rob portrait cropped

LCC alumnus Rob Wray established Elefest 12 years ago

Can you tell us a bit about why and how Elefest was launched?

“The origin of it was way back before the turn of the millennium. There was a lot of talk about regeneration and arts and culture within the Elephant & Castle area, and a voluntary organisation called Neon was trying to influence the regeneration process and make art and culture part of that.

“I first got in touch with Neon while I was studying here [at LCC] in 2000. And because of my background – I was studying Enterprise & Management in the Creative Arts here, doing a diploma course – and because I was running events and festivals, mainly film-based, when I got involved in Neon there was all this talk about creativity and regeneration.

“But I come from the school of thought that says, “Let’s just do something”, create something, otherwise the regeneration process could take 15 years, 20 years, 30 years, and in the meantime your life is over, and nothing’s happened!

“Elefest was established primarily as a film and video festival to showcase local filmmakers, and to show films that were relevant to the local community. But the idea always was to go further than film.

“It was probably my naivety that took me to setting the festival up. And I’m from the area – I’m originally from Walworth, just round the back of East Street. I live in Bermondsey now, so I’ve moved about a mile in 41 years!

“Also, the events and festivals stuff I was doing up until then I was having to do over in east London – in Brick Lane and Shoreditch and Hoxton back in ’98, ’99, because there was no real infrastructure round here to do it.

“So it was a combination of wanting to do something to get involved locally, but also some element of frustration that I was able to do creative work outside of The Elephant, but I couldn’t do anything here where I grew up.”

Bratby murals tour

Artist David Bratby is leading a farewell tour of his subway murals on Thursday 2 October

What do you like about working in the area?

“I don’t think there’s anything I like or dislike, it is what it is. I think there was always an issue with people being negative about Walworth and Elephant & Castle. Most people, if I said I was from Walworth, thought I either said Woolwich or I was making a joke about the department store.

“So then you’d say Elephant & Castle to try and give them something to link onto, but obviously back then all they would have heard about was the Ministry of Sound, or the Shopping Centre, or the two roundabouts.

“Elephant & Castle is what it is, but I think it’s probably special because it is on the ancient road down to Kent – The Old Kent Road – so there’s probably been this psychogeography in this area where people have been going somewhere else, to and from this place, for a long while. Which I find fascinating.”

venues map

The venues for this year’s Elefest

What have been the particular challenges involved with organising Elefest over 12 years?

“The challenges would have been getting people to take it seriously that we were having a festival in Elephant & Castle during the first few years, because it was film- and cinema-related and we didn’t have a functioning cinema in the area. Still don’t. So you said, “We’re having an Elephant & Castle film festival” and most people would laugh.

“So then you could turn that to your advantage and get some publicity out of it because you were challenging people’s perceptions. It is effectively my home so I’ve never felt negative about it. So in that sense you go, “Well, why shouldn’t we?”

“The hardy perennial is usually money, because you’re always trying to do more than you can with the money you have. You can’t create something without having the resources to do it, so you either have to become self-financing  and self-sufficient, or you need to find sponsorship – but as with any money, there are certain associations with that.

“You’re constantly trying to square that circle; how do you keep it reasonably cheap, and how do you get the resources to do it?”

And what’s been the answer to that this year?

“I think the answer’s always the same, we need to become self-financing and self-sufficient, in order to give it longevity, because the developers aren’t going to be here forever.

“Currently we get some money from them, we get some money from the council, some money from Film London this year, but the developers and the council aren’t going to be funding it forever, and I think strategically you have to go “Right, where do we go with this?”

“There’s also sometimes a bizarre psychology with things that are free, in that people think because it’s free it must be crap. To some sections of the community it’s a free festival, so it should always be that way, but for other people they think if it’s free it’s not worth anything.

“And there’s politics involved in trying to coordinate 10 or 12 different venues that all have different artistic or creative bents. A lot of people think there’s a lot more money in it than there is, and a lot of people think there’s a bigger team than there is.

“There isn’t really a full-time team all year. We have myself and three or four people, but most of the time that’s condensed within the last month/six weeks, because we don’t have the resources to have people sitting around, and we all have to go and do other work that makes a living.

“Anyway, we’re still going, older and wiser!”

Can you tell us which events you’re most excited about in the festival line-up this year?

“We’ve got the Maccabees playing a DJ set for the launch night at the Coronet, which is good. It’s quite exciting because they’re making an album in a studio locally, and a filmmaker’s making a film to accompany it about the Elephant & Castle. So because of that kind of connection, it was quite useful to get them to open it.

“So they’re playing and we’ve got a few bands playing that night; we’ve got a Cuban band Friday night, we’ve got a load of stuff at the Cinema Museum, we’ve got the StockMKT – the opening night’s probably the most exciting thing.”

WARA

Latin ensemble WARA play at Hotel Elephant on Friday 3 October

And finally, is there anything that Elefest hasn’t yet achieved that you would like it to in the future?

“I don’t want it to become any longer – I think four days is perfect. At one stage it was running for two weeks and that was crazy – on even less money than we have now. But that was before I got a bit older and had a mortgage and kids! So I don’t think I would want it to get any bigger in that sense.

“I do honestly think it can become or should become self-financing, self-reliant. And it should become the festival that is associated with Elephant & Castle in the truest sense of the word. So that when people think of Elephant & Castle, they think of Elefest.

“It’s got a long, rich history of theatre, music hall, circus; every kind of cultural and creative history is here. Then the Second World War came and the redevelopment came after the war, and all that infrastructure was gone.

“So it’s not like it isn’t possible for that to be reimagined or recreated.”

Absolutely! Many thanks for your time, Rob, and here’s to another fantastic Elefest weekend.

Visit the Elefest website

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