Archive for the ‘Exhibitions’ category

Mead Scholarships & Fellowships: 2014 winner Jason File plots subversive solo exhibition

Jason File 

A year on from his successful application to the Mead Scholarships & Fellowships programme, Chelsea College graduate Jason File in currently putting the final touches on his upcoming solo exhibition – An Ornament and a Safeguard.

The Mead Scholarships & Fellowships programme is one of the most prestigious  student and graduate support initiatives at UAL, and is made possible through the generous support of Scott Mead.

Mead Fellowships provide up to £10,000 for recent UAL graduates to allow them the time and flexibility to develop their creative practice after graduation. File has used the funding he received last year to conceive an exhibition that aims to show “as transparently as possible, the ‘total potential value’ of a monetary art prize to an early-career artist”.

Expending £4,999 of his £5,000 Mead Fellowship grant on legitimate exhibition costs, File will display the ephemera generated by this process in the form of a physical ‘balance sheet’, ranging from documentation of the cost to evidence of the value produced – including a published catalogue and the potential acquisition of the installation itself.

“Perhaps only in the art world can a £1 coin be legitimately offered for sale for £10,000” Jason File, 2014 Mead Fellow.

An Ornament and a Safeguard will take place 29 April – 6 June 2015 at The Ryder Project (19a Herald Street, London E2 6JT)

Finally, applications for this year’s Mead Scholarships & Fellowships are currently open and close on 1 May 2015, 5pm.

Find out more about Mead Scholarships & Fellowships, including how to apply.  

 

 

 

Jo Glover, Senior Graphic Designer at the V&A and LCC alumna, talks us through her designs for Alexander McQueen: Savage Beauty

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Savage Beauty Poster, Jo Glover, V&A, 2015.

The V&A’s record-breaking current exhibition, Alexander McQueen: Savage Beauty, is the first and largest retrospective of the late designer’s work to be presented in Europe.

LCC alumna Jo Glover, who graduated from BA (Hons) Graphic and Media Design in 2006, is Senior Graphic Designer at the V&A, and has been in charge of developing the design identity of the exhibition. Jo has been involved in every detail of the show from the selection of the lead image and designing the promotional campaign, to perfecting the details of the guides, leaflets and invitations.

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Savage Beauty, Jo Glover, V&A, 2015.

The exhibition will showcase McQueen’s visionary body of work. Spanning his 1992 MA graduate collection to his unfinished A/W 2010 collection, McQueen’s designs will be presented with the dramatic staging and sense of spectacle synonymous with his runway shows.

We caught up with Jo to find out more about her journey from LCC to the V&A.

So Jo, can you tell us a little bit about your role as senior graphic designer at the V&A? How did you get to this job, and what do you enjoy about it?

I got the job in 2011 after working at ad agency Wieden+Kennedy and doing my MA at the RCA. I also worked in branding for three years at Venturethree which helped with the more commercial work I do for marketing.

The job at the V&A combines the parts I loved from the advertising and branding jobs with my first job in the arts and cultural sector designing books for the likes of the RA. I love the variety of working on beautiful luxury print through to exhibition design and way finding. It never gets boring and is always a challenge.

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Savage Beauty, Jo Glover, V&A, 2015.

Can you explain your involvement in the Savage Beauty exhibition? What excited you about it and what you were nervous about?

I worked closely with marketing and press and the curatorial team to make sure we told the story of the exhibition through the print and digital campaign. I had to really fight for the very macabre savage image because it could be seen as intimidating but I think the lead image encapsulates the whole idea of both savage and beauty.

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Savage Beauty, Jo Glover, V&A, 2015.

So what was important to you in your approach to the designs for Savage Beauty?

In my approach to the savage beauty designs it was important to capture the slick high end luxury feel whilst retaining the darkness that comes through Lee McQueen’s work. We also really wanted to highlight the less known collections as well as the obvious ones. The events like the dinner are very high profile with a number of celebrity guests so we used lots of beautiful embossing, matte and gloss contrasts, and great paper.

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Savage Beauty, Jo Glover, V&A, 2015.

How would you describe your style and design sensibilities?

I’d say my style and design sensibilities are very pure, clean and quite classic but this obviously depends on the brief and market I’m working to. You have to be able to adapt and embrace styles that work with the audience or visitors you are targeting.

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Savage Beauty, Jo Glover, V&A, 2015.

How did LCC prepare you for life in the working world?

LCC prepared me so well for the working world because I did the industrial placement year where I got valuable experience from Elle magazine in London, the Chase in Manchester and Storm design in Melbourne, Block Branding in Perth and Principals branding and 2Birds design in Sydney. I also worked at Why Not Associates in London when I got back. This allows you to work out what you like and don’t like and also to travel and experience many different ways of working.

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Savage Beauty, Jo Glover, V&A, 2015.

Can you give one piece of advice for an aspiring graphic design student?

My one piece of advice would be to work hard, don’t be scared to make mistakes, and make lots of tea to get involved if you’re on a placement!

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Savage Beauty, Jo Glover, V&A, 2015.

Find out more about BA (Hons) Graphic and Media Design

Read Jo’s alumni profile

Find out more about Alexander McQueen: Savage Beauty and book tickets

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LCC staff and students take shows to Derby’s FORMAT International Photography Festival

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AK-47 from ‘Vietnam Deprimed’, Lewis Bush, 2014.

Two photography shows curated by LCC staff will be exhibited at this year’s FORMAT International Photography Festival in Derby.

‘Media and Myth’ is curated by LCC alumni Lewis Bush (also a visiting practitioner) and Monica Alcazar-Duarte, with Paul Lowe, Course Leader for MA Photojournalism and Documentary Photography.

First staged in 2014 and part-funded by the LCC Graduate School, the exhibition brings together material produced during the College’s NAM project, which explored the role of the media in the Vietnam War.

Participating students took a diverse range of approaches to the topic. They examined the ways in which photography was used to record the conflict, looked at underground zines produced by US servicemen stationed in south-east Asia, and used a variety of media to present their ideas and research.

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Visitors at ‘Media and Myth’ in 2014. Image © Lewis Bush

Lewis tells us: “Though I think Monica and I already had some idea of the diversity of the work produced for the NAM project, we were still quite surprised at what we found when we started really looking.

“There were research projects exploring everything from graphic design and underground magazine production, to the legacy of post-traumatic stress and collections of soldiers’ own photography.

“We were both impressed by the level of commitment some of the students had shown to a research topic that was in some ways quite far removed from the focus of their course.”

‘Media and Myth’ also includes photographs drawn from the Stanley Kubrick Archive, housed at LCC, which proved to be a key resource for many of the participants in the NAM project.

On display are images produced during the making of the director’s 1985 Vietnam War film Full Metal Jacket, which reveal how Kubrick sought to dress and disguise the disused Becton Gasworks site in east London as the set of the battle-scarred Vietnamese city of Hue.

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A spread from ‘Voices of Dissent’, Amin Musa, 2014.

The curators say: “The Vietnam War might have passed into history, but its lessons and legacy remain plain to see in the conduct of modern wars and the way the media report them, and in the ways that these conflicts merge with popular culture and entertainment.”

Artists showing in ‘Media and Myth’ are: Jacob Balzani, Madeleine Corcoran, Cinzia D’Ambrosi, Julia Johnson, Veronika Lukasova, Steve Mepsted, Amin Musa, Linka A. Odom, Lewis Bush and Monica Alcazar-Duarte.

Also at the festival is ‘The Forensic Turn’, a group show curated by LCC’s Paul Lowe and featuring work by Simon Norfolk, Zijah Gafic, Edmund Clark, Ashley Gilbertson, and Fred Ramos.

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Image © Zijah Gafic

The exhibition considers the problems surrounding images of atrocity – often accused of aesthetising or exploiting suffering – and looks at work which depicts not the act of violence or the victim but the spaces and objects involved in such acts.

The artists included in the show focus on the traces of war and conflict rather than its direct effects on the human body, but still open up a space in which the viewer can engage with the situation.

Paul explains: “By exploiting the presence of absence in objects, they offer an alternative and powerful route to the documentation of violence.”

Both shows are open at 1 Corn Exchange, Derby, from Friday 13 March to Sunday 12 April 2015, with a Private View on Thursday 12 March, 7-9pm.

Read more about MA Photojournalism and Documentary Photography

Visit the FORMAT Festival website

Read more about the LCC Graduate School

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LCC student Calvin Lok gets visitors talking at V&A

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Calvin’s final greeting sticker design. Image © Calvin Lok

Calvin Lok, a student on LCC’s BA (Hons) Spatial Design course, has described showing his work in the Victoria & Albert Museum’s ‘Disobedient Objects’ exhibition as “like a dream come true”.

First-year student Calvin got the chance to collaborate with the internationally renowned museum after receiving an email asking for submissions, and quickly made the decision to apply.

The museum was looking for thought-provoking contributions to their show, which explored  the history of protest, rebellion and revolution.

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Calvin’s work on show at the V&A. Image © Calvin Lok.

When his proposal was accepted, Calvin enlisted fellow student Celine Loh to help fine-tune his ideas. The pair researched ways to engage visitors in a conversation with their exhibit, and with each other.

An initial plan to hand out personalised placards to be carried around the show was rejected in favour of simple greeting stickers reading ‘Hello, I believe in…’, allowing people to complete the sentence in their own words.

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Calvin’s posters explored the ideas of revolution and change. Image © Calvin Lok.

Calvin also made mock-revolutionary posters and leaflets printed on newspaper for added authenticity, and used them to show infographics about the history of protest.

Calvin found that the project gave him vital first-hand experience of how people interact with an exhibition and each other in a gallery space.

Looking back on his achievement, he writes, “This is quite possibly the most amazing opportunity I have had in my life thus far”.

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Visitors enjoy completing the sentence on their stickers. Images © Calvin Lok.

Read Calvin’s blog posts about the show

Read more about BA (Hons) Spatial Design

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Staging Disorder // Jennifer Good

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‘Staging Disorder’, Black Dog Publishing, co-edited by Christopher Stewart and Esther Teichmann.

LCC’s current showcase exhibition Staging Disorder runs until Thursday 12 March 2015, and the eponymous publication by Black Dog Publishing is co-edited by its curators Christopher Stewart and Esther Teichmann.

The book and exhibition feature photography that explores the ‘real’ in relation to depictions of modern conflict.

We interviewed contributing writer and LCC Senior Lecturer Jennifer Good to find out more.

Tell us a bit about your contribution to Staging Disorder.

When I looked at the work included in the exhibition I was immediately reminded of the writing of Sigmund Freud on ‘the Uncanny’, and also his ideas about how we ‘act out’ our fears in an unconscious, symptomatic way. What also came to mind was Gaston Bachelard’s book ‘The Poetics of Space’, in which he writes that the analysis of spaces can reveal a lot about our unconscious experience.

In my essay I tried to weave these three concepts together, thinking about the spaces of staged conflict as symptoms of deep social anxiety, externalised in uniquely three-dimensional form.

What particularly interests you about the subject of staged conflict?

For a long time I’ve been fascinated by the connection between architecture and the psyche – how spaces are inhabited by our minds as well as our bodies – and by the further complication that happens when photography enters these spaces and creates representations of them.

The places depicted in this exhibition are deeply evocative because of what we are invited to imagine happening in them. I find them troubling on all sorts of levels, because they can tell us a lot about who we are as a society.

What are you currently working on?

My book, ‘Photography and September 11th: Spectacle, Memory, Trauma’, is coming out on 26 March (Bloomsbury), and I’m about to start work on a new book project, ‘Understanding Photojournalism’, with my colleague Paul Lowe and Robert Hariman.

What do you think is the effect of holding an exhibition and book launch like Staging Disorder at LCC?

Esther and Christopher have done a fantastic job in bringing together the work of such internationally-renowned photographers and connecting it with newly commissioned sound works by members of UAL staff.

The exhibition and book both draw attention to different strands of research and arts practice that are already happening here. As well as raising the profile of the College, it’s great for our students too.

Is there any advice you would give our current students?

The time you spend at university is a time to take risks in your work, interrogate and push it from all angles, question every preconception and above all respond to what really makes you tick, instead of just doing what you think is expected of you.

Jennifer Good is Senior Lecturer, History & Theory of Photojournalism & Documentary Photography, London College of Communication.

Read more about Staging Disorder

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Staging Disorder // Angus Carlyle

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The Cave Mouth and The Giant Voice in LCC’s Well Gallery. Image © Lewis Bush.

Our photography and sound arts exhibition Staging Disorder is open until Thursday 12 March, and explores ideas of the ‘real’ in relation to modern conflict.

We asked exhibiting sound artist and Co-Director of CRiSAP (Creative Research into Sound Arts Practice) Angus Carlyle to tell us more about his work.

Can you tell us a bit about your contribution to Staging Disorder?

The Cave Mouth and The Giant Voice is a collaboration between myself and the anthropologist Rupert Cox. Installed in a dark space beneath the bridge across the Well Gallery, the work centres on a cave under the town of Sunabe, on the island of Okinawa.

It was here that Yogi-San sheltered from the US naval bombardment and it was here where he took us to tell his story.

That story is relayed in projected subtitles and by a composition of environmental sounds that connects the cave and Yogi’s memories of its past to the present day and the audible American military presence.

What drew you to tackle the subject of staged conflict?

In a sense, The Cave Mouth is a sketch for a sequel to our previous project called Air Pressure.

Air Pressure focused on an organic small-holding that is now almost engulfed by the architecture of Narita Airport near Tokyo but remains home to the last farming family of the many who settled in the area in the aftermath of WWII and created rich arable land out of what once was forest.

Among other things, Rupert and I are interested in how lives can be lived in intense environmental circumstances, how the present might be connected to the past and how sound can make these complex realities audible.

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Image © Lewis Bush.

What responses have you received to the work you are showing?

Among the various words I’ve heard used to describe The Cave Mouth have been “heavy”, “disturbing”, “harsh”, “delicate”, “meditative” and, dismayingly, “interesting”.

Quite a number of people have commented on how the work recreates the atmosphere of the dripping cave and our walk across the lagoon with some night fishermen.

Others have talked about the pace and rhythm of the subtitles or have spoken of how the sounds within the installation blur and blend with the noises bleeding in from outside.

What are you currently working on outside the College?

Rupert is currently writing a book for Bloomsbury Press – The Sound of the Sky Being Torn – which is an historical ethnography of military aircraft noise.

I am completing various parts of a long-term project based on the Picentini mountain range in Southern Italy, with an album of environmental sound recordings and several texts to be published in the summer.

Over the next two years we will both be collaborating on a new soundfilm that explores more of the island of Okinawa, working with the acoustic scientist Kozo Hiramatsu and the media artist Atsushi Nishimura.

What do you think is the effect of holding an exhibition like this at LCC?

We are very lucky at LCC to have such a vibrant and active programme of exhibitions. Even outside the degree show season there is always work to listen to and to see; and this is not just in the main gallery spaces but also in PARC, in the library and in the screenings organised by the Documentary Research Forum.

Having said that, the very scale of Staging Disorder, how it has been curated and designed, how it shifts between different media, and how it inhabits the College, makes it a particularly powerful presence. I hope it inspires and provokes.

What advice would you give to current LCC students?

I find it difficult to answer your question. The phrases that are on the tip of my tongue are things our students already know well in their hearts and demonstrate in their practice.

Can I wriggle out of a direct response by offering a quotation from the artist Robert Irwin that the LCC alumnus Dan Holdsworth recently sent me? Irwin, a visual artist whose later work involves interventions that alter the perception of space, recommended that:

“For the next week, try the best you can to pay attention to sounds. You will start hearing all these sounds coming in. Once you let them in, you’ve already done the first and most critical thing, you’ve honoured that information by including it. And by doing that, you’ve actually changed the world.”

Visit Angus Carlyle’s website

Read more about CRiSAP

Learn more about Staging Disorder

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Ladybird looks to the future of design with LCC

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Some of Ladybird’s most enduring children’s books. Image © Lewis Bush

Students from London College of Communication have joined forces with iconic publisher Ladybird Books in a collaboration that will reimagine the brand in today’s world, as part of its centenary celebrations.

The six-month long project – culminating in an exhibition during London Design Festival – will see students present their concepts to Ladybird with the potential to move their designs into production with chosen retail partners.

“This is an exciting chance for our students to interpret and compare important visual representations from the past with the cultural and societal concerns of today. Not only does this project with Ladybird give our students a glimpse into a world of visual beauty, the Ladybird archive has stirred us to look at and debate the world around us,” said Paul Bowman, Course Leader, BA (Hons) Illustration and Visual Media.

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Ladybird’s book illustrations are instantly recognisable. Image © Lewis Bush

The creative heritage represented by Ladybird’s much-loved books is at the apex of the collaboration. Students are challenged to produce a forward-looking item – inspired by an optimistic age – that positions the brand in today’s landscape.

Speaking about the project, Damian Treece, Brand Manager at Penguin Ventures, said:

“Establishing a relationship with London College of Communication during Ladybird’s centenary year was a high priority for Penguin Ventures. We wanted to partner creativity and innovation with a real commercial opportunity for students.

“We have been blown away by their enthusiasm for vintage Ladybird and we very much look forward to seeing final designs.”

Currently in the research and experimentation phase, students will present their concepts to Ladybird in late March before the winners are announced after the Easter break.

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Ladybird representatives brought a selection of the brand’s vintage illustrations to a briefing for LCC students. Image © Lewis Bush.

Read more about LCC’s Ladybird project

Visit the Vintage Ladybird website

 

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LCC students uncover Secrets and Lies at Dalston’s Doomed Gallery

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Students and guests attend the Private View at Doomed Gallery. Image by exhibiting student Lilian von Keller.

Third-year students on LCC’s BA (Hons) Media and Cultural Studies course recently gained invaluable industry experience by organising an off-site exhibition of their work at London’s Doomed Gallery.

‘Secrets and Lies’ explored the idea of individuality from both a creative and theoretical perspective, with the work on show often highly personal and covering subjects as diverse as religion, sexuality and architecture.

Students worked in teams to arrange different aspects of the exhibition, learning about the challenges of events organisation in the process.

Doomed Gallery in Dalston supports both emerging and established artists, with an emphasis on photography. The exhibition space has hosted work by over 300 photographers since opening its doors in 2011.

For the LCC show, Latisha Berker-Boyd exhibited a collection of naked selfies, some found via Facebook, entitled ‘The Theory of Nude’, inspired by the digital era and current trends in self-expression.

Gizem Kaya’s work explored cliches created by the media about Muslim women, with Gizem juxtaposing portraits of her subject, in which she gazes back at those who have placed her under scrutiny, with the woman’s framed wedding vows.

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Students prepare work for their show. Image by exhibiting student Lilian von Keller.

Heidi Agyapong’s ‘Strangers’ featured 28 Londoners photographed using Polaroids, together with a single word the subjects chose to describe their character. Heidi wanted to challenge London’s anonymity by creating a sense of closeness with people we would not otherwise get to know.

‘Vertical Landscapes’ by Lilian von Keller was a surrealist work highlighting the unexplored spaces created by urban architecture, and imagined a vertical walk up the side of a skyscraper.

Video piece ‘Secrets of our Journey’ by Maria-Louisa Harrison used the metaphor of a train journey to address the journey of life and death, with Maria-Louisa’s voiceover playing over continuous footage of train tracks.

Isabel Fernando’s ‘Space’ examined the use of space within the home and its relationship to particular family members, looking at private, domestic areas to ask how space can represent and define personal identity.

You can learn more about ‘Secrets and Lies’ in this feature for Next Up, an online news and culture magazine created by LCC BA (Hons) Journalism students James Childs and Diana Tleuliyeva.

Read more about BA (Hons) Media and Cultural Studies

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LCC students uncover Secrets and Lies at Dalston’s Doomed Gallery

exhibition PV

Students and guests attend the Private View at Doomed Gallery. Image by exhibiting student Lilian von Keller.

Third-year students on LCC’s BA (Hons) Media and Cultural Studies course recently gained invaluable industry experience by organising an off-site exhibition of their work at London’s Doomed Gallery.

‘Secrets and Lies’ explored the idea of individuality from both a creative and theoretical perspective, with the work on show often highly personal and covering subjects as diverse as religion, sexuality and architecture.

Students worked in teams to arrange different aspects of the exhibition, learning about the challenges of events organisation in the process.

Doomed Gallery in Dalston supports both emerging and established artists, with an emphasis on photography. The exhibition space has hosted work by over 300 photographers since opening its doors in 2011.

For the LCC show, Latisha Berker-Boyd exhibited a collection of naked selfies, some found via Facebook, entitled ‘The Theory of Nude’, inspired by the digital era and current trends in self-expression.

Gizem Kaya’s work explored cliches created by the media about Muslim women, with Gizem juxtaposing portraits of her subject, in which she gazes back at those who have placed her under scrutiny, with the woman’s framed wedding vows.

set up

Students prepare work for their show. Image by exhibiting student Lilian von Keller.

Heidi Agyapong’s ‘Strangers’ featured 28 Londoners photographed using Polaroids, together with a single word the subjects chose to describe their character. Heidi wanted to challenge London’s anonymity by creating a sense of closeness with people we would not otherwise get to know.

‘Vertical Landscapes’ by Lilian von Keller was a surrealist work highlighting the unexplored spaces created by urban architecture, and imagined a vertical walk up the side of a skyscraper.

Video piece ‘Secrets of our Journey’ by Maria-Louisa Harrison used the metaphor of a train journey to address the journey of life and death, with Maria-Louisa’s voiceover playing over continuous footage of train tracks.

Isabel Fernando’s ‘Space’ examined the use of space within the home and its relationship to particular family members, looking at private, domestic areas to ask how space can represent and define personal identity.

You can learn more about ‘Secrets and Lies’ in this feature for Next Up, an online news and culture magazine created by LCC BA (Hons) Journalism students James Childs and Diana Tleuliyeva.

Read more about BA (Hons) Media and Cultural Studies

The post LCC students uncover Secrets and Lies at Dalston’s Doomed Gallery appeared first on London College of Communication Blog.

Staging Disorder // Beate Geissler, Geissler/Sann

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From ‘Personal Kill’, Geissler/Sann, photographed by Lewis Bush.

LCC’s current showcase exhibition Staging Disorder runs until Thursday 12 March 2015, and features work by high-profile photographers and sound artists responding to ideas of modern conflict and the ‘real’.

We asked Beate Geissler of exhibiting duo Geissler/Sann to tell us more about the pair’s project ‘Personal Kill’.

Tell us a bit about the work you’re showing as part of Staging Disorder.

‘Personal Kill’ depicts interiors of so-called MOUT sites – training installations for Military Operations on Urban Terrain, used to teach close-range combat. The work references a book entitled ‘On Killing’ by Lt. Col. Dave Grossman.

He writes, “In Vietnam the term ‘personal kill’ was used to distinguish the act of killing a specific individual with a direct-fire weapon and being absolutely sure of having done it oneself. The vast majority of personal kills and the resultant trauma occur at this range.”

The resulting trauma of a ‘personal kill’ is more severe than, for example, witnessing comrades or even family getting killed, since it is within the self that we find the source of the horror and not in the other. Something nobody can train an individual for.

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‘Personal Kill’ by Geissler/Sann in Staging Disorder at LCC. Photographed by Lewis Bush.

What drew you to tackle the subject of staged conflict?

We were very interested in the simulating qualities of those training sites, their relation to reality and virtuality. The gamification and zombiefication that takes place, which is extending, bending and creating reality, was the focus of our research. It is a feeling like walking in a movie.

When we entered those tunnel systems, it felt like descending into the collective unconscious of western society. These are sites where soldiers are trained to pull the trigger on their opposite.

Friedrich Hegel describes the transition from natural being to social and cultural subject as a violent and traumatic one. He coined the term ‘night of the world’, which he defined as an irreducible dimension of the finitude of subjectivity.

It is the abyss of negativity, the night of the eye, glimpsed in the uncanny gaze of the Other. This is a form of imagination which is the radical negativity of arbitrary freedom.

What are you currently working on outside the College?

We just published a new book ‘Volatile Smile’, which investigates the impact of technology on systems of global commerce. We were interested in the mutual impact of real and cybernetic architecture, with Chicago as its archetype.

What made Chicago a centre of speculative culture — a culture which so rapidly emerged as the ‘non-place’ where cybernetic logic bears its strangest and perhaps most powerful fruits?

What do you think is the effect of holding an exhibition like this at LCC?

Maybe students get inspired, start to raise more questions and become aware that this culture of fear which was created in the last decades is something we need to change.

What advice would you give to current LCC students?

Don’t do shiny art for glossy people.

Beate Geissler is Associate Professor and Area Coordinator Photography, University of Illinois at Chicago.

Visit the Geissler/Sann website

Read more about Staging Disorder

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