Archive for the ‘Exhibitions’ category

Staging Disorder // Angus Carlyle

Angus Carlyle - entrance

The Cave Mouth and The Giant Voice in LCC’s Well Gallery. Image © Lewis Bush.

Our photography and sound arts exhibition Staging Disorder is open until Thursday 12 March, and explores ideas of the ‘real’ in relation to modern conflict.

We asked exhibiting sound artist and Co-Director of CRiSAP (Creative Research into Sound Arts Practice) Angus Carlyle to tell us more about his work.

Can you tell us a bit about your contribution to Staging Disorder?

The Cave Mouth and The Giant Voice is a collaboration between myself and the anthropologist Rupert Cox. Installed in a dark space beneath the bridge across the Well Gallery, the work centres on a cave under the town of Sunabe, on the island of Okinawa.

It was here that Yogi-San sheltered from the US naval bombardment and it was here where he took us to tell his story.

That story is relayed in projected subtitles and by a composition of environmental sounds that connects the cave and Yogi’s memories of its past to the present day and the audible American military presence.

What drew you to tackle the subject of staged conflict?

In a sense, The Cave Mouth is a sketch for a sequel to our previous project called Air Pressure.

Air Pressure focused on an organic small-holding that is now almost engulfed by the architecture of Narita Airport near Tokyo but remains home to the last farming family of the many who settled in the area in the aftermath of WWII and created rich arable land out of what once was forest.

Among other things, Rupert and I are interested in how lives can be lived in intense environmental circumstances, how the present might be connected to the past and how sound can make these complex realities audible.

Angus Carlyle - text

Image © Lewis Bush.

What responses have you received to the work you are showing?

Among the various words I’ve heard used to describe The Cave Mouth have been “heavy”, “disturbing”, “harsh”, “delicate”, “meditative” and, dismayingly, “interesting”.

Quite a number of people have commented on how the work recreates the atmosphere of the dripping cave and our walk across the lagoon with some night fishermen.

Others have talked about the pace and rhythm of the subtitles or have spoken of how the sounds within the installation blur and blend with the noises bleeding in from outside.

What are you currently working on outside the College?

Rupert is currently writing a book for Bloomsbury Press – The Sound of the Sky Being Torn – which is an historical ethnography of military aircraft noise.

I am completing various parts of a long-term project based on the Picentini mountain range in Southern Italy, with an album of environmental sound recordings and several texts to be published in the summer.

Over the next two years we will both be collaborating on a new soundfilm that explores more of the island of Okinawa, working with the acoustic scientist Kozo Hiramatsu and the media artist Atsushi Nishimura.

What do you think is the effect of holding an exhibition like this at LCC?

We are very lucky at LCC to have such a vibrant and active programme of exhibitions. Even outside the degree show season there is always work to listen to and to see; and this is not just in the main gallery spaces but also in PARC, in the library and in the screenings organised by the Documentary Research Forum.

Having said that, the very scale of Staging Disorder, how it has been curated and designed, how it shifts between different media, and how it inhabits the College, makes it a particularly powerful presence. I hope it inspires and provokes.

What advice would you give to current LCC students?

I find it difficult to answer your question. The phrases that are on the tip of my tongue are things our students already know well in their hearts and demonstrate in their practice.

Can I wriggle out of a direct response by offering a quotation from the artist Robert Irwin that the LCC alumnus Dan Holdsworth recently sent me? Irwin, a visual artist whose later work involves interventions that alter the perception of space, recommended that:

“For the next week, try the best you can to pay attention to sounds. You will start hearing all these sounds coming in. Once you let them in, you’ve already done the first and most critical thing, you’ve honoured that information by including it. And by doing that, you’ve actually changed the world.”

Visit Angus Carlyle’s website

Read more about CRiSAP

Learn more about Staging Disorder

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Ladybird looks to the future of design with LCC

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Some of Ladybird’s most enduring children’s books. Image © Lewis Bush

Students from London College of Communication have joined forces with iconic publisher Ladybird Books in a collaboration that will reimagine the brand in today’s world, as part of its centenary celebrations.

The six-month long project – culminating in an exhibition during London Design Festival – will see students present their concepts to Ladybird with the potential to move their designs into production with chosen retail partners.

“This is an exciting chance for our students to interpret and compare important visual representations from the past with the cultural and societal concerns of today. Not only does this project with Ladybird give our students a glimpse into a world of visual beauty, the Ladybird archive has stirred us to look at and debate the world around us,” said Paul Bowman, Course Leader, BA (Hons) Illustration and Visual Media.

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Ladybird’s book illustrations are instantly recognisable. Image © Lewis Bush

The creative heritage represented by Ladybird’s much-loved books is at the apex of the collaboration. Students are challenged to produce a forward-looking item – inspired by an optimistic age – that positions the brand in today’s landscape.

Speaking about the project, Damian Treece, Brand Manager at Penguin Ventures, said:

“Establishing a relationship with London College of Communication during Ladybird’s centenary year was a high priority for Penguin Ventures. We wanted to partner creativity and innovation with a real commercial opportunity for students.

“We have been blown away by their enthusiasm for vintage Ladybird and we very much look forward to seeing final designs.”

Currently in the research and experimentation phase, students will present their concepts to Ladybird in late March before the winners are announced after the Easter break.

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Ladybird representatives brought a selection of the brand’s vintage illustrations to a briefing for LCC students. Image © Lewis Bush.

Read more about LCC’s Ladybird project

Visit the Vintage Ladybird website

 

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LCC students uncover Secrets and Lies at Dalston’s Doomed Gallery

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Students and guests attend the Private View at Doomed Gallery. Image by exhibiting student Lilian von Keller.

Third-year students on LCC’s BA (Hons) Media and Cultural Studies course recently gained invaluable industry experience by organising an off-site exhibition of their work at London’s Doomed Gallery.

‘Secrets and Lies’ explored the idea of individuality from both a creative and theoretical perspective, with the work on show often highly personal and covering subjects as diverse as religion, sexuality and architecture.

Students worked in teams to arrange different aspects of the exhibition, learning about the challenges of events organisation in the process.

Doomed Gallery in Dalston supports both emerging and established artists, with an emphasis on photography. The exhibition space has hosted work by over 300 photographers since opening its doors in 2011.

For the LCC show, Latisha Berker-Boyd exhibited a collection of naked selfies, some found via Facebook, entitled ‘The Theory of Nude’, inspired by the digital era and current trends in self-expression.

Gizem Kaya’s work explored cliches created by the media about Muslim women, with Gizem juxtaposing portraits of her subject, in which she gazes back at those who have placed her under scrutiny, with the woman’s framed wedding vows.

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Students prepare work for their show. Image by exhibiting student Lilian von Keller.

Heidi Agyapong’s ‘Strangers’ featured 28 Londoners photographed using Polaroids, together with a single word the subjects chose to describe their character. Heidi wanted to challenge London’s anonymity by creating a sense of closeness with people we would not otherwise get to know.

‘Vertical Landscapes’ by Lilian von Keller was a surrealist work highlighting the unexplored spaces created by urban architecture, and imagined a vertical walk up the side of a skyscraper.

Video piece ‘Secrets of our Journey’ by Maria-Louisa Harrison used the metaphor of a train journey to address the journey of life and death, with Maria-Louisa’s voiceover playing over continuous footage of train tracks.

Isabel Fernando’s ‘Space’ examined the use of space within the home and its relationship to particular family members, looking at private, domestic areas to ask how space can represent and define personal identity.

You can learn more about ‘Secrets and Lies’ in this feature for Next Up, an online news and culture magazine created by LCC BA (Hons) Journalism students James Childs and Diana Tleuliyeva.

Read more about BA (Hons) Media and Cultural Studies

The post LCC students uncover Secrets and Lies at Dalston’s Doomed Gallery appeared first on London College of Communication Blog.

LCC students uncover Secrets and Lies at Dalston’s Doomed Gallery

exhibition PV

Students and guests attend the Private View at Doomed Gallery. Image by exhibiting student Lilian von Keller.

Third-year students on LCC’s BA (Hons) Media and Cultural Studies course recently gained invaluable industry experience by organising an off-site exhibition of their work at London’s Doomed Gallery.

‘Secrets and Lies’ explored the idea of individuality from both a creative and theoretical perspective, with the work on show often highly personal and covering subjects as diverse as religion, sexuality and architecture.

Students worked in teams to arrange different aspects of the exhibition, learning about the challenges of events organisation in the process.

Doomed Gallery in Dalston supports both emerging and established artists, with an emphasis on photography. The exhibition space has hosted work by over 300 photographers since opening its doors in 2011.

For the LCC show, Latisha Berker-Boyd exhibited a collection of naked selfies, some found via Facebook, entitled ‘The Theory of Nude’, inspired by the digital era and current trends in self-expression.

Gizem Kaya’s work explored cliches created by the media about Muslim women, with Gizem juxtaposing portraits of her subject, in which she gazes back at those who have placed her under scrutiny, with the woman’s framed wedding vows.

set up

Students prepare work for their show. Image by exhibiting student Lilian von Keller.

Heidi Agyapong’s ‘Strangers’ featured 28 Londoners photographed using Polaroids, together with a single word the subjects chose to describe their character. Heidi wanted to challenge London’s anonymity by creating a sense of closeness with people we would not otherwise get to know.

‘Vertical Landscapes’ by Lilian von Keller was a surrealist work highlighting the unexplored spaces created by urban architecture, and imagined a vertical walk up the side of a skyscraper.

Video piece ‘Secrets of our Journey’ by Maria-Louisa Harrison used the metaphor of a train journey to address the journey of life and death, with Maria-Louisa’s voiceover playing over continuous footage of train tracks.

Isabel Fernando’s ‘Space’ examined the use of space within the home and its relationship to particular family members, looking at private, domestic areas to ask how space can represent and define personal identity.

You can learn more about ‘Secrets and Lies’ in this feature for Next Up, an online news and culture magazine created by LCC BA (Hons) Journalism students James Childs and Diana Tleuliyeva.

Read more about BA (Hons) Media and Cultural Studies

The post LCC students uncover Secrets and Lies at Dalston’s Doomed Gallery appeared first on London College of Communication Blog.

Staging Disorder // Beate Geissler, Geissler/Sann

Geissler Sann by Lewis Bush

From ‘Personal Kill’, Geissler/Sann, photographed by Lewis Bush.

LCC’s current showcase exhibition Staging Disorder runs until Thursday 12 March 2015, and features work by high-profile photographers and sound artists responding to ideas of modern conflict and the ‘real’.

We asked Beate Geissler of exhibiting duo Geissler/Sann to tell us more about the pair’s project ‘Personal Kill’.

Tell us a bit about the work you’re showing as part of Staging Disorder.

‘Personal Kill’ depicts interiors of so-called MOUT sites – training installations for Military Operations on Urban Terrain, used to teach close-range combat. The work references a book entitled ‘On Killing’ by Lt. Col. Dave Grossman.

He writes, “In Vietnam the term ‘personal kill’ was used to distinguish the act of killing a specific individual with a direct-fire weapon and being absolutely sure of having done it oneself. The vast majority of personal kills and the resultant trauma occur at this range.”

The resulting trauma of a ‘personal kill’ is more severe than, for example, witnessing comrades or even family getting killed, since it is within the self that we find the source of the horror and not in the other. Something nobody can train an individual for.

Geissler Sann on right by Lewis Bush

‘Personal Kill’ by Geissler/Sann in Staging Disorder at LCC. Photographed by Lewis Bush.

What drew you to tackle the subject of staged conflict?

We were very interested in the simulating qualities of those training sites, their relation to reality and virtuality. The gamification and zombiefication that takes place, which is extending, bending and creating reality, was the focus of our research. It is a feeling like walking in a movie.

When we entered those tunnel systems, it felt like descending into the collective unconscious of western society. These are sites where soldiers are trained to pull the trigger on their opposite.

Friedrich Hegel describes the transition from natural being to social and cultural subject as a violent and traumatic one. He coined the term ‘night of the world’, which he defined as an irreducible dimension of the finitude of subjectivity.

It is the abyss of negativity, the night of the eye, glimpsed in the uncanny gaze of the Other. This is a form of imagination which is the radical negativity of arbitrary freedom.

What are you currently working on outside the College?

We just published a new book ‘Volatile Smile’, which investigates the impact of technology on systems of global commerce. We were interested in the mutual impact of real and cybernetic architecture, with Chicago as its archetype.

What made Chicago a centre of speculative culture — a culture which so rapidly emerged as the ‘non-place’ where cybernetic logic bears its strangest and perhaps most powerful fruits?

What do you think is the effect of holding an exhibition like this at LCC?

Maybe students get inspired, start to raise more questions and become aware that this culture of fear which was created in the last decades is something we need to change.

What advice would you give to current LCC students?

Don’t do shiny art for glossy people.

Beate Geissler is Associate Professor and Area Coordinator Photography, University of Illinois at Chicago.

Visit the Geissler/Sann website

Read more about Staging Disorder

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Staging Disorder // Beate Geissler, Geissler/Sann

Geissler Sann by Lewis Bush

From ‘Personal Kill’, Geissler/Sann, photographed by Lewis Bush.

LCC’s current showcase exhibition Staging Disorder runs until Thursday 12 March 2015, and features work by high-profile photographers and sound artists responding to ideas of modern conflict and the ‘real’.

We asked Beate Geissler of exhibiting duo Geissler/Sann to tell us more about the pair’s project ‘Personal Kill’.

Tell us a bit about the work you’re showing as part of Staging Disorder.

‘Personal Kill’ depicts interiors of so-called MOUT sites – training installations for Military Operations on Urban Terrain, used to teach close-range combat. The work references a book entitled ‘On Killing’ by Lt. Col. Dave Grossman.

He writes, “In Vietnam the term ‘personal kill’ was used to distinguish the act of killing a specific individual with a direct-fire weapon and being absolutely sure of having done it oneself. The vast majority of personal kills and the resultant trauma occur at this range.”

The resulting trauma of a ‘personal kill’ is more severe than, for example, witnessing comrades or even family getting killed, since it is within the self that we find the source of the horror and not in the other. Something nobody can train an individual for.

Geissler Sann on right by Lewis Bush

‘Personal Kill’ by Geissler/Sann in Staging Disorder at LCC. Photographed by Lewis Bush.

What drew you to tackle the subject of staged conflict?

We were very interested in the simulating qualities of those training sites, their relation to reality and virtuality. The gamification and zombiefication that takes place, which is extending, bending and creating reality, was the focus of our research. It is a feeling like walking in a movie.

When we entered those tunnel systems, it felt like descending into the collective unconscious of western society. These are sites where soldiers are trained to pull the trigger on their opposite.

Friedrich Hegel describes the transition from natural being to social and cultural subject as a violent and traumatic one. He coined the term ‘night of the world’, which he defined as an irreducible dimension of the finitude of subjectivity.

It is the abyss of negativity, the night of the eye, glimpsed in the uncanny gaze of the Other. This is a form of imagination which is the radical negativity of arbitrary freedom.

What are you currently working on outside the College?

We just published a new book ‘Volatile Smile’, which investigates the impact of technology on systems of global commerce. We were interested in the mutual impact of real and cybernetic architecture, with Chicago as its archetype.

What made Chicago a centre of speculative culture — a culture which so rapidly emerged as the ‘non-place’ where cybernetic logic bears its strangest and perhaps most powerful fruits?

What do you think is the effect of holding an exhibition like this at LCC?

Maybe students get inspired, start to raise more questions and become aware that this culture of fear which was created in the last decades is something we need to change.

What advice would you give to current LCC students?

Don’t do shiny art for glossy people.

Beate Geissler is Associate Professor and Area Coordinator Photography, University of Illinois at Chicago.

Visit the Geissler/Sann website

Read more about Staging Disorder

The post Staging Disorder // Beate Geissler, Geissler/Sann appeared first on London College of Communication Blog.

PhD researcher, Idit Nathan talks about her current show at Standpoint Gallery

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The exhibition FOOTNOTES PLAYING DEAD is Idit Elia Nathan’s (PhD candidate at CSM) first solo show. It opened at Standpoint Gallery in London on the 15th January and will run till 14th Feb 2015.

Footnotes Playing Dead is the culmination of 5 years of practice-based research titled Art of Play in Zones of Conflict, which explores the intersections between the seemingly unrelated phenomenons of play and conflict.

The exhibition title takes its cue from the opening lines of Günter Grass’ famously controversial poem What Must Be Said, which considers personal and collective responsibilities in times of adversity and interminable conflict. The title also reflects on children’s games and certain theatrical demonstrations in the West Bank and Gaza as well as more recently here in London, where people pretend to be dead in order to highlight the way in which children and innocent civilians are targeted by one of the most powerful armies in the world.

Tell us about the work you are showing in Footnotes Playing Dead and why did you choose this work?

The artworks are all playful and interactive because I wanted to create participatory experiences in which the viewers are invited to “play with” and explore for themselves the complexities of conflicts, which as stated by Artist Simon Leung

‘…even if we do not live under the direct threat of war’s violence, we understand ourselves in relationship to the state-sanctioned killing of others, elsewhere, in our time, and at times in our name’.

I included three projects which are central to my research and which I wanted to concentrate in one space. For example Seven Walks in a Holy City which explores Jerusalem, the city I grew up and left more than twenty years ago is explored through walks of varying length, thematic foci and staring points, all determined by cards and dice. Following the walks I produced seven series of postcards, which are on display and available for purchase. Another project called Hegemonopoly/Machsompoly is an adaptation of the classic monopoly game to reflect on the landscape of Israel Palestine with its wealth of settlements as well as checkpoints and where freedom of movement and restrictions on it are not equal to all, as those playing in the gallery soon find out. In Painting the City Golden or a Leaf from Tansy’s Book the gallery visitors are invited to ‘colour in’ their own version of one of the city’s most iconic tourist sites.

There are other games such as a triptych of HAND MADE MEMORY GAMES where all the cards are made out of black and white photos from different parts of the world as well as from a variety of historical times with subject matters ranging from Aerial Bombs in the first to Checkpoints and Refugees inthe second and third, making it tricky to win. And there is my first inkjet print Invisible Cities Series, No. 1 and my first artists book Please watch ur head, published with marmalade publishers of visual culture so its a very varied show.

It has been particularly interesting to get all the artworks of recent years into one space and it was great to site the work at Standpoint gallery, with its intimate and evocative features such as the lift with its heavy metal mesh doors. The opening event included a raffle of postcard paintings which will be sent out to the winners once the show comes down. So far I have had some excellent feedback and with two discussion events planned it promises to be a busy and interesting month for me.

Why did you choose CSM for your PhD studies, and how did you find the experience? (how has studying for a PhD developed your work)

When I started considering the possibility of embarking on a research project to contextuaise work that was loosely tied together a friend pointed me in the direction of my now supervisors Pam Skelton and Professor Anne Tallantire. I knew and admired their work and was delsighted when they offered me a place. They were then joined by Caterina Albano and I now have an amazing team of supervisors, each contributing from their own perspective so its proved to be a very rich experience so far. There is no doubt that the research has impacted positively on the work I have made in ways that I am still in the process of reflecting on and I hope will be articulated in the thesis itself. It seems to have made me more reflective and I’d like to think a better writer too. In terms of the work produced I think it has benefited from the contextual research and hopefully become richer and more rigorous.

How do you juggle being a PhD student and practitioner?

It is a challenge and I have given up on trying to find the perfect balance – it just doesn’t exist. Some weeks/months are dedicated to making work and others to writing and the word juggling is the right one in this context. I make work, sometimes relating to the thesis, at others less so, and then it feels like I will never manage to write about it or get back to the thesis and then it can be quite the opposite – making the work – means that some of the thoughts fall much more easily onto the page and find their way into the thesis. As fluxus’ score says ‘you never quite know.’

For further information:

 

LCC announces major photography, sound and moving image exhibition ‘Staging Disorder’

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Opening on Monday 26 January and curated by Christopher Stewart and Esther Teichmann, ‘Staging Disorder’ explores the contemporary representation of the real in relation to modern conflict.

The project is initiated and supported by Karin Askham, Dean of the School of Media.

The exhibition includes selected images from seven photographic series that were made independently of each other near the start of the new millennium:

Adam Broomberg and Oliver Chanarin’s ‘Chicago’, Geissler/Sann’s ‘personal kill’, Claudio Hils’ ‘Red Land Blue Land’, An-My Lê’s ’29 Palms’, Richard Mosse’s ‘Airside’, Sarah Pickering’s ‘Public Order’ and Christopher Stewart’s ‘Kill House’.

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’747 Heathrow’, Richard Mosse

These artists portray fake domestic rooms, aircraft, houses, streets and entire towns designed as military and civilian mock-ups in preparation for real or imagined future conflicts across the globe. Their work asks questions about the nature of truth in current photographic practice.

The images in all seven series are documentary images of something which appears real but has in fact been staged to mimic a disordered reality.

In capturing this constructed reality, the works explore modern, premeditated conflict, and analyse a unique form of architecture.

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‘High Street’, Sarah Pickering

The ‘Staging Disorder’ concept refers not to how the photographers have staged disordered reality themselves, but rather to how they have recognised and responded to a phenomenon of staging that already exists.

These themes are also extended throughout the LCC gallery spaces in work by sound artists from UAL’s Creative Research into Sound Arts Practice (CRiSAP) research centre.

CRiSAP artists Cathy Lane, Angus Carlyle (and his collaborator, the anthropologist Rupert Cox), David Toop and Peter Cusack add a multi-dimensional element to the photographic works with sound and moving image installations and written texts.

The show coincides with a symposium on the afternoon of Tuesday 27 January and a book launch at 6pm of the publication ‘Staging Disorder’ by Black Dog Publishing, co-edited by Christopher Stewart and Esther Teichmann.

Staging Disorder
Private View: Tuesday 27 January 6-9pm
Exhibition open: Monday 26 January – Thursday 12 March
Opening times: Monday-Friday 10am – 5pm, Saturday 11am – 4pm, Sunday closed
RSVP for Private View
Venue: London College of Communication, Elephant & Castle, London SE1 6SB.

#stagingdisorder

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LCC Postgraduate Shows 14 // Spotlight on MA Photojournalism and Documentary Photography

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‘Abide with Me’, Andy Barmer, 2014.

Kicking off 2015 at LCC – with a Private View on Thursday 8 January – is our final Postgraduate Show of the season, featuring work by thirty-three talented postgraduate students from MA Photojournalism and Documentary Photography.

In this year’s show, ‘Consider This’, we see how Rwanda is making a new history through competitive cycling, picture the private lives of Iranian women differently, view a mythical interpretation of Galicia, northern Spain, and explore how history is recorded and remembered via the story of an unresolved plane crash.

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‘X-Ray’, Betty Zapata, 2014.

Work also includes Betty Zapata’s undercover project ‘X-Ray’, which reveals how public hospitals in Venezuela are locked in their own emergency.

‘X-Ray’ shows from the inside the decomposition of public healthcare facilities and the suffering of vulnerable patients as the country undergoes huge political and economic crisis.

The constant realities of poverty, violence, internal political conflicts, corruption, negligence and abandonment are found to be present both within the walls of public hospitals and within the borders of Venezuela itself.

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‘Abide with Me’, Andy Barmer, 2014.

Andy Barmer is showing ‘Abide with Me’, a fourteen-minute film short and four-minute dual screen looped video installation exploring three generations of one family – daughter, mother and grandfather – and the influence of the past upon the present.

Daughter Beth travels to France, Yorkshire and Scotland to explore her grandfather’s traumatic Great War history, and psychological issues are shown to resonate down the generations.

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‘And the Mountain Said to Munzur: You, River of My Tears’, Miriam Stanke, 2014.

In ‘And the Mountain Said to Munzur: You, River of My Tears’, Miriam Stanke presents the story of Dersim, a remote mountainous area of Eastern Anatolia with the Munzur river and valley at its heart.

Dersim is the historical heartland of the Kurdish Alevis, a heterodox religious group that has suffered a long history of oppression and violence and continues to fight for its heritage.

The project captures glimpses of a society whose cultural and religious history reveals itself not only in special prayers and rites but in clear political actions towards autonomy and equality.

LCC Senior Lecturer Max Houghton introduces ‘Consider This’:

“Photography’s ability to create or extend discourse is not yet utilised fully in our sophisticated culture; its use more frequently associated with instant, devourable satisfaction, as defined by the unsavoury neologism ‘click-bait’.

“The gentle invitation, then, to look longer; to consider, may be the most radical act you could engage in today”.

Not a Blank Canvas

‘Not a Blank Canvas’, Joshua Irwandi, 2014.

School of Media: MA Photojournalism and Documentary Photography

Exhibition open: Friday 9 – Thursday 15 January 2015
Private View: Thursday 8 January 6-9pm
RSVP to Private View
Late night opening: Wednesday 14 January until 9pm

Read more about MA Photojournalism and Documentary Photography

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LCC alumna reveals lives of hospice patients in new exhibition

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Jade Sempare, 31, was diagnosed with MS at the age of 13. She told Eléonore about how her house keys represented living independently from her mum.

MA Photojournalism and Documentary Photography alumna Eléonore de Bonneval has recently been working with patients at St. Joseph’s Hospice, Mare Street, Hackney, to create a series of intimate portraits capturing the most important objects in their lives.

Launched to coincide with Hospice Care Week, Eléonore’s ‘Everlasting Lives’ exhibition features photographs of objects selected not for their materialistic value but for the personal and emotional stories attached.

St Joseph’s Hospice is one of the oldest and largest hospices in Britain, founded in 1905. It is an independent charity providing compassionate support and care for people with life-limiting conditions and terminal illnesses in Hackney and the City of London, Newham and Tower Hamlets.

Speaking at the exhibition opening, Eléonore said:

“I want to thank St Joseph’s Hospice staff and patients for their support and trust throughout this project.

“Jade, Sanjay, Lucie, John, Josie, Susan and Viviane told me about their life stories, we identified together five objects that mattered to them, but really those objects don’t matter.

“What do matter are the stories attached. Through those you’ll get a window into their lives, hear about their trips, favourite books or music and most importantly you’ll hear about the essential role played by their beloved friends and family.”

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John Waterhouse’s photograph of his dad

John Waterhouse, 77
Diagnosed with blood cancer in January 2013

My dad
I was born the wrong time, 1937. I didn’t see my father. I don’t remember seeing my father until I was 8 years of age. It wasn’t a normal upbringing because my mother was in the hospital. She had TB. She died at 32. I was 9.

I was about 8 years of age when my dad came back, he was like a stranger because I had not seen him at all really. I remember he came in, he gave us a little jar of sweets and went round the pub. I still remember that day. I don’t know what sweets it was in those days, everything was rationed.

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Toys belonging to Susan Murray’s children

Susan Murray, 52
Diagnosed with MS on January 18, 2008

‘Eric the Sheep’ and ‘Stripey Zebra’, my children’s teddy bears.
I had my first kid Alfy, now 15, when I was 38 and Jake, now 12, when I was 40. The only thing I didn’t do is travel to South America, which is the next place I wanted to go to. But I had the kids instead.

My life has completely changed since I had the kids. It does. They are really important to me.

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Perfume bottle belonging to Viviane Fatimani’s grandmother

Viviane Fatimani, 29
Diagnosed with MS in December 2009

The scent of my French grandmother
My grandmother died last year at Christmas, two days before we came to visit but I think it was on purpose because she always made me promise I would be at her funeral. When I was living in Mexico, sometimes she said ‘you will come back for my funeral right?’ ‘Yeah of course I will Mémé !’.

I have kept her perfume because it smells of her. It is Cinema by Yves Saint Laurent. I can’t believe she used to bath herself in this stuff. I used to think that it was just what she used to smell of. I didn’t realize it was perfume. My aunt told me ‘you should take the perfume’.

I took it to my sister and I said: ‘Close your eyes, smell this, what is it ? What does it smell of?’ She said, ‘it smells of Mémé!’

‘Everlasting Lives’ continues at St Joseph’s Hospice until Friday 16 January 2015 and is open every day 9am-6pm.

Read more about MA Photojournalism and Documentary Photography

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