Archive for the ‘London College of Communication’ category

MA Documentary Film graduate nominated for Learning on Screen award

LCC alumnus Giulietta Verdon-Roe, who recently graduated from the MA Documentary Film course, has been nominated in the British Universities Film & Video Council‘s Learning on Screen Awards 2014.

These are the only UK awards celebrating and rewarding excellence in the use of moving image and related media in learning, teaching and research. Giulietta’s graduation film USIZI is nominated in the Student Production Postgraduate Documentary category.

USIZI follows young South African dancer Dane Hurst as he rehearses for a solo performance. “It’s not like you just step onto stage and do it. You have to work. You have to sweat,” Hurst explains.

The film explores both his passion and intense physical and mental dedication as he pushes his body to the limit. It also offers a glimpse into the deeply personal circumstances of Hurst’s cultural heritage that helped to forge his unerring vision.

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Still from USIZI, 2013.

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Still from USIZI, 2013.

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Still from USIZI, 2013.

Giulietta directed and edited the documentary, receiving a Distinction for her completed MA.

The award winners will be announced at the Learning on Screen Awards ceremony held at BFI Southbank on the evening of Thursday 24 April. The ceremony will also include a showcase of all nominated entries.

Read about MA Documentary Film

Read about the Learning on Screen Awards

Visit Giulietta Verdon-Roe’s website

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LCC’s MA Interaction Design Communication students join The Trumpet for social media modelling

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Programme Director Ben Stopher and students map their social media habits

Students on London College of Communication’s MA Interaction Design Communication course recently took part in a social media modelling workshop run locally in Elephant & Castle by The Trumpet, specialists in crowd-powered change.

After taking over a unit in The Clarence Centre for Enterprise and Innovation, South Bank University’s business incubator and start-up hub, The Trumpet organised a series of community-focused events based around urban creativity. The first was Everybody Needs Somebody, run by designers and researchers Dr Kevin Walker and LCC alumnus John Fass.

Just as an architectural model shows the fine detail of a building development, a social network model shows how we are linked to the people closest to us. Participants in the workshop were invited to make tangible, physical objects out of everyday materials in order to build up a picture showing how people are connected to each other.

Each person was given a tile and was asked to stick coloured pins into it, connected to each other by coloured elastic, representing six people in their network. They then wrote short descriptions of how they knew each person. The finished artefacts externalised individual social networks, which can be difficult to see or understand as they are complex and change frequently, in a way that retained human values – and a sense of fun.

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Read about MA Interaction Design Communication

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Wear Your Clothes Inside Out and join students from UAL in support of Fashion Revolution Day

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Two students from London College of Communication and London College of Fashion are encouraging you to wear your clothes inside out for worldwide Fashion Revolution Day on 24 April and join in a day of action to raise awareness of the issue of ethical garment manufacturing.

Fashion Revolution Day, on the anniversary of the Rana Plaza disaster which killed 1,133 people when a factory complex collapsed in Bangladesh, aims to highlight the fashion industry’s most pressing issues, demand greater transparency in clothing supply chains and improve the lives of the millions of often vulnerable people who make our clothes.

“We want people to turn their clothes inside out, study the label, and ask the question: who made my clothes?” says LCC BA (Hons) Graphic and Media Design student Katie Baggs, who, together with London College of Fashion student Alice Bodgener, is coordinating a Fashion Revolution day of action on Oxford Street on 24 April.

“We want people to be aware of the working conditions of people that make their clothes, not to take things for granted. What happened at Rana Plaza should affect the entire fashion industry. We have a food labelling scheme in the UK, brands are happy to list the ingredients in their food. We know how our fish is sourced, why not our clothes?”

The day of occupation and activities, which Katie is keen to stress is “not a day of protest, but a day to ask questions”, will start at 8am at Oxford Circus and end with a “fash mob” [sic] on Carnaby Street in collaboration with ethical underwear makers Pants to Poverty.

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Perhaps one of the most surprising aspects of the Rana Plaza disaster was that, even a week later, many brands did not know whether or not they had been producing clothing within the building.

The theme for the first year of Fashion Revolution Day brings the consumer to the forefront and tell brands that they want to know who made their clothes.

People are encouraged to be curious about their clothes by taking pictures of their labels and sending them to brands on social media, asking them where they’re from. The hope is to create a global movement and inspire ongoing action, the way it has with Katie and Alice.

“My involvement with Fashion Revolution sprang out of a collaborative ‘Critical Mass’ project and exhibition for LCC Green Week,” say Katie.

“Researching Rana Plaza I was shocked by what I found and so the project was a response to that. We used giant washing label instructions to carry the message, in posters, and through an intervention in Oxford Street, speaking to people about sweatshop labour and raising awareness of Rana Plaza. With Alice, I have developed the design and the idea further for Fashion Revolution Day and we want to continue after that.”

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One way the action will continue is through the Evolving Fashion Society created by Alice and LCF students which will be encouraging interdisciplinary conversations and interactions.

“Our hope with Evolving Fashion is that it acts as a network to bring students who are already exploring sustainable practices together, to share ideas, collaborate and promote sustainability to a wider audience,” says Alice, who is a second-year FDA Designer Pattern Cutter student at LCF.

“The fashion industry is in dire need of a revolution, and Fashion Revolution and Evolving Fashion exist to support the next generation to make that change.”

How to get involved in Fashion Revolution Day:

Be curious and find out where your clothes are made…

Wear your clothes #InsideOut and Tweet: Today I’m wearing my (shirt/dress/T-shirt etc.) #insideout because I want to ask @ (brand/retailer) Who Made Your Clothes?

Support brands you know are creating ethical and sustainable solutions…

Wear your clothes #InsideOut and Tweet: Today I’m proud to wear my (shirt/dress/T-shirt etc.) #insideout because @ (brand/retailer) KNOW Who Made My Clothes.

Join Fashion Revolution Day on Thursday 24 April at Oxford Circus with Pants to Poverty and the Evolving Fashion Society. See the Facebook group for where and when: facebook.com/events/220104868179904/?fref=ts


Further Reading:

fashionrevolution.org/about/why-do-we-need-a-fashion-revolution/

blogs.arts.ac.uk/csm/2014/03/31/fashion-revolution-day/


Social Media:

twitter.com/fash_rev

instagram.com/fash_rev

twitter.com/EvolvingFashUAL

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London College of Communication launches guest speaker series ‘Design Dialogues 20/20/20′

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Sennep described how their interactive installation ‘Dandelion’ found success at the V&A and Wired’s NextFest. Copyright Sennep.

LCC’s Dean of the School of Design, Professor Lawrence Zeegen, has launched a brand new series of informal guest presentations and conversations for the College’s postgraduate community and Friends of the School of Design.

‘Design Dialogues 20/20/20′ are an opportunity to meet and learn about UAL Chairs, Visiting Professors, Visiting Fellows and industry practitioners, learning more about their approach to design practice, design thinking and design research.

Taking place 4.30-5.30pm on selected Thursdays, the events follow a 20/20/20 format with a 20-minute guest presentation, a 20-minute Q&A session and 20 minutes networking.

The inaugural Dialogue took  place on Thursday 20 March and featured Matt Rice and Hege Aaby of interactive design studio Sennep. Matt and Hege told attendees about their ‘Philosophy of Trying Stuff’, describing how small personal projects have led to huge exposure for the studio and frequently a level of success that they could not have predicted.

Watch the Sennep presentation //

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Sennep’s iPad game OLO began life as an HTML5 coding experiment in studio downtime. Copyright Sennep.

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The commercial success of Sennep’s personal projects has secured them more client work, like this app for McKinsey & Company. Copyright Sennep.

Future Design Dialogues //

  • 24 July – TBC

Further details and RSVP information will be released nearer the time.

Read about LCC’s School of Design

Visit the Sennep website

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LCC and ArtsTemps join forces to pilot technical internship for LCC student

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Intern Sophie Chatellier at work in the College. Copyright Lewis Bush.

UAL’s temp employment service ArtsTemps, part of Student Enterprise and Employability at UAL, has joined forces with London College of Communication Technical Resources to create a unique student opportunity.

A 12-week technical internship open to LCC students and graduates is being piloted, as both the ArtsTemps and Technical Resources teams saw the benefit of offering a paid internship to a student or graduate keen to gain knowledge in the technical areas of the College.

ArtsTemps recognises the positive impact that on-campus work experience has on UAL students and graduates, offering working opportunities which help to develop employability skills and prepare students for careers in industry and the creative and cultural sector.

The two departments are both part-funding the intern’s salary to ensure that it is above the London Living Wage. The hope is that this pilot will be rolled out to offer more internships in the future.

The position proved very popular with students and graduates of LCC. Twenty-six applications were received within three days of the role being advertised, and a panel selected BA (Hons) Graphic and Media Design (2013) graduate Sophie Chatellier as the successful candidate.

Sophie has been placed in the Print and Finish department with Tony Yard and Scott House and is working two days a week supporting the area and learning essential industry skills.

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Copyright Lewis Bush

Read about BA (Hons) Graphic and Media Design

Visit the ArtsTemps website

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Exhibition // MA Graphic Design alumnus explores Croydon’s past in ‘Ghost Town’

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‘Ghost Town: The Hauntology of Croydon’ is curated by LCC alumnus Rob Mowbray

Opening on Saturday 5 April in London is an exhibition inspired by architectural ‘ghosts’ in the London Borough of Croydon and curated by MA Graphic Design alumnus Rob Mowbray.

‘Ghost Town: The Hauntology of Croydon’ celebrates the extraordinary post-war building programme that transformed the town. Croydon was so heavily redeveloped between 1956 and 1972 that for nearly 20 years, virtually nothing else happened. As a result, the concrete office blocks which dominate the area’s skyline also act as eerie memorials to a bygone age.

Much of the work on display at Croydon School of Art’s Parfitt Gallery was produced by Rob himself during his postgraduate research project, with other contributions including a triptych from LCC’s BA (Hons) Graphic and Media Design Course Leader Craig Burston.

The centrepiece of the exhibition is ‘The Sir James Marshall Psychogeographic Memorial: The Hauntological Convergence of Urban Planning, Free Enterprise and Ghosts… in Croydon’, in which Rob attempts to visualise the philosophical concept of hauntology by using Croydon as a case study.

Also on display are works including ‘Craterform’, a deconstruction of a newspaper Rob produced as part of a photographic architectural study, and ‘Looking Up’, taken from a psychogeographic study of Croydon’s high rise buildings using the 1970s picture postcard aesthetic.

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‘The Sir James Marshall Psychogeographic Memorial: The Hauntological Convergence of Urban Planning, Free Enterprise and Ghosts… in Croydon’

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‘Craterform’

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‘Looking Up’

Ghost Town: The Hauntology of Croydon
Saturday 5 April – Friday 2 May
Parfitt Gallery
Croydon School of Art
College Road
Croydon
CR9 1DX

Read about MA Graphic Design

Read our 2013 PG Shows preview of Rob’s work

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Video // Jeremy Deller introduced by Scott King now online

The talk given by Turner Prize-winning artist Jeremy Deller at London College of Communication on Thursday 13 March is now available to watch online.

Jeremy was introduced by UAL Chair, designer and artist Scott King, with whom he has often collaborated. The talk began here at LCC, as Jeremy recalled a course in printing techniques that he took here during the early 1990s, before spanning key moments in an artistic career focused around history, society and pop culture.

The artist spoke about his inspiration in producing 1997′s ‘Acid Brass’, in which a brass band performed acid house tracks in an exploration of folk culture, media hysteria and civil unrest. He described how the success of the work liberated him from “making things”, noting that “the public are much more open-minded than you might think”.

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Jeremy Deller talks to UAL staff and students

Jeremy went on to talk about his interest in the Miners’ Strike and his recreation of ‘The Battle of Orgreave’ (2001) – “a highly contested moment in British history” – featuring those connected with the original clash alongside members of historical re-enactment societies. He showed the 1973 photograph of flamboyant wrestler Adrian Street and his Welsh miner father which first interested him in Street as a subject.

The talk also covered ‘Folk Archive’ (2000-5), some of Jeremy’s work with prolific banner maker Ed Hall, and his rejected proposal for Trafalgar Square’s fourth plinth – a piece of wreckage from the Iraq conflict which will soon by displayed in the reopened Imperial War Museum.

He closed with a look at the explicitly UK-focused room he curated at the 2013 Venice Biennale, and a project juxtaposing photographs from David Bowie’s fantastical Ziggy Stardust tour with images of real contemporary news events. The evening ended with a Q&A session featuring questions to Jeremy about his career from audience members and Scott King himself.

A huge thank you from LCC to Jeremy and Scott for an insightful, engaging and wide-ranging evening.

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UAL Chair Scott King chairs a Q&A session with Jeremy Deller

Read more about UAL Chair Scott King

Visit Jeremy Deller’s website

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Exhibition // LensCulture Exposure Awards celebrate best international photography

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David Favrod, 1st Prize portfolio category, from the series ‘Hakiri’

A selection of the world’s finest photography goes on display at London College of Communication (LCC) from 1 – 5 April, as part of the LensCulture Exposure Awards 2014.

LensCulture, is an online platform and community committed to discovering and promoting the most exciting photography from its global network.

The exhibition, which includes 70 photos from the 25 finalists represents some of the best in contemporary global photography by photographers living in 20 countries around the world.

The incredibly diverse and inspiring winning entries were selected by nine international jurors from over 10,000 photographs submitted by photographers in 62 countries.

The competition, which was open to all genres of photography, also includes LCC alumni Maria Gruzdeva (MA Photography 2011) and Ciril Jazbec (MA Photojournalism and Documentary Photography, 2011) in the list of finalists.

Yijun Liao, 2nd Prize Portfolio Category. from the series "Experimental Relationship"

Yijun Liao, 2nd Prize Portfolio Category, from the series “Experimental Relationship”

Richard Tuschman, 3rd PrizePortfolio Category, from the series "Hopper Meditations"

Richard Tuschman, 3rd Prize Portfolio Category, from the series “Hopper Meditations”

LensCulture Exposure Awards 2014
Tuesday 1 – Saturday 5 April
Upper Street Gallery, London College of Communication, SE1 6SB

more info: www.lensculture.com/2013-lensculture-exposure-award-winners

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Graphic Design // LCC graduate designs branding for London Live launch

Yoni Alter, London Live, Gherkin

The launch of London’s newest TV channel, London Live, is set to be a colourful one, thanks to the brilliant and bold branding from LCC MA Graphic Design graduate Yoni Alter.

Israeli-born Yoni, has produced a series of bright, colorful idents depicting iconic London landmarks which have been animated by ad agency Kemistry and will be used as intros to news coverage and shows on the channel.

Yoni Alter’s debut London show is at the Kemistry Gallery from 27 March – 3 May 2014. There you can see his London Live graphics and more work inspired by urban landscapes and architecture.

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Yoni Alter, London Live, waterfront

Yoni Alter, London Live, Wemberley

Exhibition info: kemistrygallery.co.uk/yoni-alter

Yoni Alter: yoniishappy.com

London Live: londonlive.co.uk

LCC MA Graphic Design: www.arts.ac.uk/lcc/courses/postgraduate/ma-graphic-design

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LCC Publishing students present to IPC Media panel

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MA Publishing student Cristiana Rodrigues outlines her ideas to the panel. Copyright Terry Beasley.

Earlier this month, London College of Communication and the UK’s largest magazine publishers, IPC Media, teamed up to host an innovative event where BA (Hons) Magazine Publishing and MA Publishing students presented major project ideas to a panel of experts. Report by BA (Hons) Journalism students Corie Schwabenland and Diana Tleuliyeva.

The collaboration took place at IPC’s magazine and digital media HQ at the Blue Fin Building, giving students a real-life context in which to receive feedback and insights about their research around a changing industry. Students, mostly in their BA final year, presented their themes, questions and methods about magazine-related topics or media ideas.

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The Blue Fin Building. Copyright Lucy Fisher.

“Obviously it’s helpful to students to have expert speakers come and talk about the field, but it’s also helpful for us to meet people who might be coming and working for us in the next four years,” said Jane Boswell, Director of Corporate Responsibility at IPC.

Organising the event with Jane, LCC Senior Lecturer Simon Das commented: “It was surprisingly easy to set up with IPC,” pointing out the Time Warner-owned company’s “helpfulness”, despite, as Simon explained, “the increasingly busy schedule that magazine media people, such as editors, face.”

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Now magazine’s Sally Eyden chats to organiser Simon Das. Copyright Terry Beasley.

IPC representatives on the day included former NME editor (now IPC special projects supremo) Steve Sutherland, Editor-in-Chief of Now Sally Eyden, Group Creative Director Brett Lewis, and Editor of What Digital Camera Nigel Atherton, as well as IPC’s training and development team, Carole Capon and Matthew Wilkinson. Panellists commented on student work throughout two sessions – morning and afternoon – occasionally challenging projects and creating dialogue about the industry as a whole. One consistent theme was attention to the commercial realities of magazine journalism, content and media in the digital era.

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Panellists Nigel Atherton, Sally Eyden and Matthew Wilkinson (l-r). Copyright Terry Beasley.

“It was nice to have someone from the industry to tell you what they’re thinking,” said student Daniela Perez, there to present her project interests around long-format journalism. “It’s interesting to get thoughts on whether the problem you see happening is really a problem.”

Another student, MA Publishing candidate Cristiana Rodrigues, received strong commendation from the panel for her presentation on ‘evergreen content’. Her idea for “storytelling in many hands” caught the attention of panellist Sally Eyden, who commented: “This is what IPC is looking at and experimenting with right now.”

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MA Publishing student Cristiana Rodrigues. Copyright Terry Beasley.

The initiative was well received by BA (Hons) Magazine Publishing Course Leader Lorraine Mallon, who commented on how much “authority and knowledge” students showed. “They have passion about what they’re actually learning and the industry that they want to go into.”

While the event was the first of its kind between LCC and IPC, its organiser Simon Das hoped it wouldn’t be the last. “It’s an idea we can develop to mix things up a little bit. IPC are just down the road from LCC. A lot of their senior staff trained here at what was then LCP. So, in one way, it’s re-establishing a historical link. In another, it’s about brand new knowledge and perspective-sharing between an industry giant and a group of creative, young and international people.”

Words by BA (Hons) Journalism students Corie Schwabenland and Diana Tleuliyeva.

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BA (Hons) Magazine Publishing students with IPC’s Brett Lewis. Copyright Terry Beasley.

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BA (Hons) Magazine Publishing and MA Publishing students. Copyright Terry Beasley.

Read about BA (Hons) Magazine Publishing

Read about MA Publishing

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