Archive for the ‘News’ category

UAL amongst three British universities leading global rankings for Art & Design

Britain has three of the top spots in the QS World University Rankings for Art & Design.

UAL, Glasgow School of Art and postgraduate specialist RCA all made the top ten in the Art & Design subject table with the remaining seven universities coming from the USA.

Students at Chelsea College of Arts, UAL

Students at Chelsea College of Arts, UAL

UAL was ranked 8th in the world, and 2nd in the UK, in the rankings which highlight the world’s top universities in 36 individual subjects, based on academic reputation, employer reputation and research impact.

Nigel Carrington, Vice-Chancellor of UAL, said: “I am proud that Britain’s world-leading reputation as a provider in art and design education has been recognised in the QR Rankings. UAL’s position amongst those leading British institutions is credit to the hard work and dedication of staff across the University.

“As Europe’s largest specialist art and design university with more than 19,000 students, UAL is a major global provider of art and design education so it’s gratifying to be recognised for the high quality education we equip our graduates with.”

In December 2014 UAL was placed in the overall top 30 UK research institutions for the quality of research submitted in the REF 2014. It was recognised as a top 5 research university in its broader peer group and first in the power ranking in the Art and Design: History, Practice and Theory category.

For full listings and more information, visit the QS World University Rankings by Subject website.

Rob Kesseler Speaks at Puerto de Ideas, Chile

RK Convergent Territories

Rob Kesseler, BA Ceramic Design Lecturer and UAL Chair of Art, Design and Science, was recently invited to participate in the second annual Puerto de Ideas in Antofagasta, Chile.

Rob delivered a keynote lecture titled Conversion Territories, and showcased an exhibition at Minera Escondita, which included photographs, drawings and specimens collected in Chile during the weeks prior to the festival.

Collecting and documenting are a core part of his work, and exhibiting this local collection enabled him to open up and help people understand his process. With the support of the British Council, he led a popular series of creative workshops for young people, drawing specimens selected for the group.

Sponsored by the mining company Minera Escondida, the festival of science and culture brings together scientists, artists and humanists from all over the world to speak, showcase work and lead workshops. Over 10,000 people attended the three-day festival. Speakers included Nobel Prize winner, Ada Yonath and Gilles Boeuf, President of the Natural History Museum, Paris.

After the festival Rob explored connections in the Chile, visiting the young design studio GT2P in Santiago, the stunning Centro de Arte Curaummilla – a ceramic workshop and artistic residency, and the Natural History Museum in Valparaiso, where his exhibition will be shown next.

Rob Kesseler will be speaking next Thursday, 7 May as part of the UAL Chairs Present Series.

More information:

Victorian Futures: Culture, Democracy and the State on the Road to Olympicopolis

On 14 and 15 May 2015, Chelsea College of Arts is hosting the conference Victorian Futures: Culture, Democracy and the State on the Road to Olympicopolis, in collaboration with Middlesex University and the Victoria and Albert Museum. We asked Professor Malcolm Quinn, UAL Associate Dean of Research and Director of the Camberwell, Chelsea and Wimbledon Graduate School, to tell us what the conference will involve and why it is relevant today.

Taking place a week after the UK General Election,Victorian Futures will focus on how the agenda for state-sponsored access to the arts in Britain has developed since the Reform Act of 1832 and the Victorian Era. We will use history to think about the future, and show how calls for greater public access to the arts in the 1830s led to the democratic visions of the Great Exhibition and Albertopolis in 1851, which were reprised in the Festival of Britain in 1951 and are now re-envisioned in plans for the ‘Olympicopolis’ site in London. I spoke to a selection of our high-profile speakers who will be appearing at the conference to discuss how the cultural movement of Victorian era continues to influence our society.

Victoria and Albert Museum Director Martin Roth said:

“The success of the ‘Albertopolis’ complex of Victorian cultural institutions in South Kensington, of which the V&A is one, continues to illustrate the strength of Victorian policies on cultural democracy and the importance of state support for the arts. But as we develop a new vision for ‘Olympicopolis’ in east London, we must not only look at Victorian achievements but also at the goals they did not reach. Henry Cole believed, for example, that international exhibitions should promote international peace and intercultural understanding, or in his words, ‘stop nations going to blows as hastily and foolishly as they are wont to do’. Are we any closer to achieving this difficult goal today? I hope that this conference will give us the opportunity to read Victorian history not as a comfort, but as a challenge.”

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Interior painting of The Great Exhibition, Crystal Palace, London

Lucy Kimbell, AHRC Design Research Fellow, Policy Lab and principal research fellow at the University of Brighton, says that Victorian Futures will show us how: “The history that is shaping our collective future in the UK includes both the visible, aesthetic and material but also the processual and infrastructural.” Kimbell also argues that the conference will help us to address an important question: “What comes with our Victorian educational, political and cultural institutions and how do they enable particular kinds of learning and participation and exclude others? The analytical task is to work out what we need to keep and what to change or adapt.”

Kieran Long, Senior Curator of Contemporary Architecture, Design and Digital V&A, one of two keynote speakers on the first day of the conference, said:

Victorian Futures is vital for us right now, at a time when the whole notion of the public realm is at stake and under pressure, to think again about the lessons our Victorian forebears can teach us about education and civic pride in the context of the complexity of the digitally enabled 21st century.”

Our other keynote speaker on day one of Victorian Futures is Charles Saumarez Smith, Secretary and Chief Executive of the Royal Academy of Arts, who sees the conference as a chance to engage with some vital issues for public culture and the arts that have remained unresolved over the past hundred and eighty years. Saumarez Smith said:

“It’s interesting to look back on the decade of the 1830s, immediately following the Great Reform Bill, and to see how many of the questions asked then in parliament were the same questions which need to be asked today: how can public money be used to enhance the arts? what is the role of government? and what is the role of museums?”

However Graeme Evans, Professor of Urban Cultures and Design at Middlesex University, who is a member of the closing panel of Victorian Futures which examines the route from Albertopolis to Olympicopolis and beyond, says that history offers a cautionary lesson: “If history teaches us anything, cultural democracy should be a right; futuristic masterplans and grand place-making on the other hand (as recent history shows) is anything but democratic – or cultural.”

The event promises to answer and discuss many of the questions raised above, with lively debates and the chance to meet and network with organisations such as the Royal Academy, V&A and the London Legacy Development Corporation (LLDC), who are responsible for delivering the ‘Olympicopolis’ project. A two-day student pass is available for £36 and can be booked through the UAL website. We’ll also be tweeting at @VFutures. We hope you’ll be able to join us.

UAL Shanghai Alumni Reception 2015

One year on from the official launch of the UAL Shanghai Alumni Association, we were delighted, to have the opportunity to return to China and celebrate with our vibrant Shanghai community. The evening was supported by China Xintiandi, a major sponsor of Shanghai Fashion Week, who added further reason to celebrate by announcing that they plan to support current UAL students through a three-year scholarship program.

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130 former students joined UAL staff at China Xintiandi’s beautiful clubhouse in the heart of the city. Guests spent an enjoyable evening strengthening their creative and professional networks and reuniting with friends. London College of Fashion’s (LCF) Dean of School of Media and Communication, Calum Mackenzie, gave an update on some of UAL’s latest achievements and exciting plans for the future, while UAL Shanghai Alumni Association Vice President, Jing Wu, gave an update on the Associations activities and ways to get involved. The audience was also pleased to hear from LCF alumna Yilei Wu, Managing Director at Xinlelu.com, who told the group about how she got to where she is today.

Lead by London College of Communication alumni Oliver Pearce and Jing Wu, the UAL Shanghai Alumni Association has been established to maintain links with our graduates in and around the city and produce events and communications throughout the year to keep local alumni connected to UAL and each other. UAL is extremely grateful to Oliver, Jing and their fellow committee members, for the hard work and dedication they have shown in growing the association and establishing a community in Shanghai eager to share, collaborate and support.

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Oliver Pearce, President of the UAL Shanghai Alumni Association with Caroline Archer, Interim Associate Director of Development and Alumni Relations, and members of the UAL Shanghai Alumni Committee.

During the evening, Carrie Liu, General Manager of Commerce at China Xintiandi, made the announcement that China Xintiandi will generously be supporting UAL via a three-year scholarship program for students from Greater China who would like to study BA Fashion at Central Saint Martins. More information about the China Xintiandi Scholarship can be found here.

“It is a great honour for China Xintiandi to collaborate with UAL in a scholarship program. As an innovation hub for Chinese designers, we are dedicated to discovering, cultivating and supporting emerging designers to drive the development of innovative fashion design in China.” Carrie Liu, General Manager of Commerce at China Xintiandi

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Joining Calum Mackenzie to greet guests  were Caroline Archer (Interim Director of Development and Alumni Relations), Paul Yuille (Director of International at LCF), Ian King (Professor of Aesthetics and Management at LCF) and Rupert Waldron (International Academic Coordinator: The School of Media and Communication at LCF).

More photos from the evening can be found on our Facebook page

Learn more about the UAL Alumni Association

Student Selected for Hong Kong Residency

Exhibition view of Excessive Enthusiasm: Ha Bik Chuen and the Archive as Practice, Asia Art Archive, Hong Kong, 2015. Courtesy of Asia Art Archive.

Exhibition view of Excessive Enthusiasm: Ha Bik Chuen and the Archive as Practice, Asia Art Archive, Hong Kong, 2015. Courtesy of Asia Art Archive.

Central Saint Martins has teamed up with Asia Art Archive, creating a new exhibition studies research residency in Hong Kong.

Asia Art Archive is a non-profit organisation that documents and makes accessible art from the region.

Alec Steadman, a student on our MRes Art: Exhibition Studies course, has been chosen through open competition as the first research fellow. He will travel to Hong Kong in July 2015.

Diverse artistic practices
Alec’s work looks at the diverse models of self-organisation currently being practiced and developed by artists in Asia, with a particular focus on the south-east Asian archipelago. As part of his residency, he will give a talk about this project.

Alec will be provided with flights, accommodation, a per diem and a modest honorarium.

More information:
MRes Art: Exhibition Studies

Unannounced Acts of Publicness to Appear in Granary Square

UnAnnounced Acts

On ten unspecified days in May, ten separate artworks will appear unannounced in Granary Square.

If you’re on your way to work, eating lunch, playing in the fountains or simply having a break from the office you might encounter them. At the end of each day, the artwork will disappear without trace. Unannounced Acts of Publicness is intended to question the meaning of ‘public’ in privately owned public spaces.

The commissioned artists are from Central Saint Martins and beyond, including recent graduates and internationally renowned practitioners. For each work one person who lives or works in the area, will be invited to witness an act and make a written response.

Unannounced Acts of Publicness has been negotiated on an agreement of trust between Central Saint Martins and the landlord Argent. Only the project curators know when and what the acts will be. The programme will be announced retrospectively on 1 June. It will then be discussed publicly at the Restless Futures conference at Central Saint Martins on 11 June.

If you think you’ve witnessed any ‘Unannounced Acts of Publicness’, do let us know what you think on Twitter using #unannouncedacts. We look forward to hearing from you.

Image credit: ‘Girl’ Clara Metter 2014

More information:

UAL graduates selected to exhibit at top London art shows

There has been a host of exciting exhibitions and events to showcase the talents of UAL graduates recently. Among them includes the prestigious annual graphic arts festival and exhibition Pick Me Up. Held in the stunning Embankment galleries at Somerset House the festival, due to run from 23 April- 4 May, promises an explosive selection of pioneering industry collectives, galleries, print studios, interactive workshops and talks.

Gaurab Thakali

Gaurab Thakali

Among this year’s Pick Me Up Selects and industry hand-picked stars of the future are Camberwell College of Art graduates Gaurab Thakali, who recently exhibited at the UAL’s Showroom Creative Outlet exhibit, and Zöe Taylor. As Pick Me Up Selects the graduates were both especially asked to produce new work to go on sale at the event.

Central Saint Martins’ Caroline Till, Course Director of MA Material Futures and trend forecasting specialist, will also be speaking at the event. The festival will act as the backdrop to the premiere of the new ‘Made You Look Documentary – A Film About Creativity in the Digital Age’; a short film that takes a rare look into commercial art scene of the digitalised 21st Century.

In keeping with this exciting wave of graphic art and illustration talent currently on display in London, Camberwell College of Art graduate Madalina Andronic will also be exhibiting at the British Academy for the humanities and social sciences in a partnership exhibition with The Folio Society. ‘Telling tales: the art of the illustrator’ will take place from Monday 11-Sunday 17 May and aims to explore the international nature of fairy tales and folk tales in their exhibition.

Finally, just around the corner from UAL’s Showroom on High Holborn, The Other Art Fair has also got underway. On until April 26 the national art fair boasts more than 150 artist exhibitors and some of the art scene’s best emerging talent. UAL graduates Emma Davis, Alison McKenna, Kirsten Baskett Piers Secunda and Richard Walker are but a few mentioned as the top 20 artists of today to exhibit at the fair.

UAL talent nominated for global design awards

Kellenberger-White_Glasgow_International_2014

A host of UAL alumni have been nominated for the Design Museum’s Designs of the Year 2015. The awards celebrate the most innovative and interesting design from around the world, and feature some of the design industry’s biggest names.

76 projects were selected for nomination, with nominees coming from over 30 countries across five continents.

London College of Communication alumna Shaz Madani was nominated for her creative direction of Riposte magazine, while alumna Penny Webb was nominated for a project that measures and transfers the dimensions of physical objects to a digital model in real time.

Camberwell College of Arts alumna Eva Kellenberger received a nomination in the graphic design category along with design partner Sebastian White for their design of the ‘Glasgow International’ 2014 identity.

Two Central Saint Martins graduates, Thomas Tait and Ann-Sofie Back, were nominated in the fashion category, as was London College of Fashion’s Jonathan Anderson whose collection draws on Jacques Tati.

Scooping further nominations were graphic design practices Graphic Thought Facility (four of its members are Central Saint Martins alumni) and Pentagram (three of the consultancy’s partners are London College of Communication alumni and a further two graduated from Central Saint Martins).

The Designs of the Year 2015 category winners will be announced on 4 May, with the overall winner due to be revealed at a ceremony at the Design Museum on 4 June. An exhibition showcasing the projects is open until 23 August.

Textile Students Win Framework-Knitter Bursaries

One of Kasia's textile pieces.

One of Kasia’s textile pieces.

Two BA Textile Design students from Central Saint Martins have been awarded prestigious bursaries by the Worshipful Company of Framework-knitters.

Oliver Thomas Lipp and Kasia Franczak, both third-year knit students, were selected for their outstanding textile design work.

This is the first time that the Worshipful Company of Framework-knitters has chosen two students from the same course.

One of Oliver's textile pieces.
One of Kasia's textile pieces.

Hand-beading and surrealism
Oliver received the David Bethel Bursary for his hand-beaded pieces, knitted using specialist yarn on a domestic knitting machine.

Kasia was given the Carr Doughty Bursary. She captured the board’s attention with her colourful collection, which combines surreal film inspiration with material innovation.

The bursaries are worth £2,500 and will help Oliver and Kasia develop their Degree Show collections.

More information:
BA Textile Design

Earth Day – sustainable food inspiration

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22 April marks the 45th anniversary of Earth Day. Observed in 192 countries worldwide, more than 1 billion people participate in Earth Day activities each year, making it the largest civic observance in the world. Sustainability is a core focus at UAL, from our curriculum and canteens to our buildings, including Wimbledon’s new BREEAM rated studios. To celebrate Earth Day 2015 we’re sharing three of our favourite organic recipes from our Soil Association Gold Award-winning cafes.

Carrot soup photo George Grinsted Creative Commons https://www.flickr.com/photos/imgeorge/

Organic Spiced Carrot Soup with Ginger & Sweet Potato
Serves 4-6
• 1.1 litres mild vegetable stock or water
• 5 thin slices of ginger
• 1 tablespoon oil
• 1 medium organic onion, thinly sliced
• 2 large garlic cloves, minced
• 1 teaspoon ground cumin
• 1 teaspoon ground coriander seed
• 1 tablespoon grated fresh ginger
• Cayenne or chilli powder to taste
• about 900g organic carrot, scrubbed well and thinly sliced
• 1 medium organic sweet potato, peeled and thinly sliced
• 150ml fresh orange juice
• Crème fraiche
• Fresh chopped coriander to garnish

Heat the vegetable stock or water in a pan with the ginger slices, and keep warm on the hob. Heat the oil in a large pot over medium heat and add the onion and a pinch of salt. Sauté for 5 minutes, then add the garlic, cumin, coriander, ginger and a few pinches of cayenne powder. Reduce the heat to low and cook until the onion is very soft, about 10 minutes more. Add the carrots, potato, and 900ml of the stock or water. Bring to the boil, then reduce the heat, cover and simmer until the carrots are very tender, around 15-20 minutes. Puree the soup in a blender or food processor until smooth. Return to the pot, add the orange juice, and thin with the remaining stock to the desired consistency. Season to taste with salt and pepper and more cayenne if desired. Serve with a dollop of crème fraiche, and a sprinkling of fresh coriander leaves.

meatballs photo by J. Annie Wang Creative Commons https://www.flickr.com/photos/j0annie/

Organic Meatballs in Napolitana sauce
Serves 2-3
• 500 g lean grass fed beef (minced)
• 125 g ricotta cheese, drained (use deli style ricotta which is firmer)
• 200g baby spinach (cooked in a little olive oil and lemon, liquid drained)
• ½ cup fresh chopped parsley
• 1 organic / free range egg
• pinch of nutmeg
• sea salt and pepper to taste
• 4 cups Napolitana fresh tomato sauce

Combine beef, ricotta, spinach, ½ cup parsley, egg, nutmeg, salt and pepper. Shape into large balls and coat in a little olive oil, then place in a deep tray lined with grease-proof paper. Do not place too closely together, making sure there is enough room around the meatballs. Bake the meatballs for 10 minutes, then add the Napolitana sauce to fill half way up the pan. Bake for a further 20 minutes until the sauce is bubbling. Serve sprinkled with fresh chopped parsley, a little grated parmesan and green vegetable spaghetti.

Panna Cotta photo Ana Paola creative commons  https://www.flickr.com/photos/99006711@N04/

Organic Vanilla Panna Cotta
Serves 4
For the panna cotta
• 3 gelatine leaves
• 250ml/9fl oz of organic milk
• 250ml/9fl oz of organic double cream
• 1 vanilla pod, split lengthways, seeds scraped out
• 25g/1oz organic sugar
For the sauce
• 175g/6oz organic sugar
• 175ml/6fl oz water
• splash cherry liqueur
• 350g/12oz of organic raspberries
To serve
• 4 sprigs fresh organic mint
• icing sugar, to dust

For the panna cotta, soak the gelatine leaves in a little cold water until soft. Place the milk, cream, vanilla pod and seeds and sugar into a pan and bring to a simmer. Remove the vanilla pod and discard. Squeeze the water out of the gelatine leaves, then add them to the pan and take off the heat. Stir until the gelatine has dissolved. Divide the mixture into four ramekin dishes and leave to cool. Place into the fridge for at least one hour, until set. For the sauce, place the sugar, water and cherry liqueur into a pan and bring to the boil. Reduce the heat and simmer until the sugar has dissolved. Take the pan off the heat and add half the raspberries. Using a hand blender, blend the sauce until smooth. Pass the sauce through a sieve into a bowl and stir in the remaining fruit. To serve, turn each panna cotta out onto a serving plate. Spoon over the sauce and garnish with a sprig of mint. Dust with icing sugar.

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Find out more about UAL’s sustainable food policy

Read more about Earth Day 2015

See how the first Earth Day was reported in the New York Times, April 1970

Discover more about sustainability at UAL