Archive for the ‘News’ category

UAL to present honorary awards to leading creative figures

Oscar-nominated actor Ralph Fiennes, BAFTA-winning actor Tom Hardy, Turner Prize-winning artist Gillian Wearing and fashion designer Phoebe Philo are among twelve leading figures in the creative and cultural sectors to be given honorary awards by UAL this year.

Honourees slider
L-R – Tom Hardy, Phoebe Philo, Ralph Fiennes, Gillian Wearing

They will be recognised for their outstanding contributions to the creative industries at UAL’s graduation ceremonies at the Royal Festival Hall from 14th-17th July 2015.

The full list of honourees for 2015 is:

  • Bill Amberg, accessories designer
  • Zeinab Badawi,journalist
  • Jonathan Barnbrook,graphic designer
  • Simon Costin,set designer
  • Ilse Crawford, interior designer
  • Tacita Dean, photographer and filmmaker
  • Theo Fennell,jewellery designer
  • Ralph Fiennes, actor
  • Tom Hardy, actor
  • Phoebe Philo, fashion designer
  • Peter Saville, graphic designer
  • Gillian Wearing, artist

Ralph Fiennes studied at Chelsea College of Arts in 1981, before going on to study acting at RADA.

He said on receiving this honorary award: “I was only at Chelsea College of Arts for a year but I know that the intense stimulation of that course provoked me, or perhaps challenged me, to want to act – to be an actor.

“A career as an actor is not a career as a visual artist but for me there are strong links and connections between all artistic disciplines and expression. The work of an actor and the work of a painter or of a director may join forces.

“The questions and challenges I encountered during that brief time at Chelsea College of Arts were rigorous: they were about life, ways of seeing, ways of interpreting the world, ways of communicating. They haven’t gone away. I feel deeply honoured to receive this Honorary Fellowship from University of the Arts London.”

Tom Hardy studied at Drama Centre London before going on to win the BAFTA Rising Star Award in 2011.

He said on receiving this honorary award: “It is an unexpected pleasure to be honoured by UAL in any way. I am very grateful and proud to receive this honour and be acknowledged at all by such a prestigious establishment.”

Gillian Wearing studied at Chelsea College of Arts before going on to win the Turner Prize in 1997.

She said on receiving this honorary award: “Being accepted at Chelsea College of Arts in the mid-eighties changed my life. I had worked for six years before as an office clerk/secretary before applying to art foundation course. Being refused by all except the Chelsea Art and Design BTEC, I had gone there to become a graphic designer but was told by a tutor that I had a fine art sensibility and that I should pursue that. It is now incredible that I have the honour of returning, having been awarded an Honorary Fellowship for my outstanding contribution to Conceptual Art, and it is with deep gratitude that I accept this honour as I became an artist because of the college.”

The honourees will be recognised for their contributions to their fields in eight graduation ceremonies over four days at the Royal Festival Hall on London’s Southbank. Each will address graduating UAL students and share their experiences and advice for a successful career in the creative industries. For full biographies of all 12 honourees, please visit our dedicated graduation page.

The ceremonies will be streamed live on UAL’s website and live-tweeted under the hashtag #UALgrads.

UAL announces major investment in Camberwell College of Arts­

University of the Arts London (UAL) has announced a major investment of over £62million into the regeneration of Camberwell College of Arts and adjoining land.

Architect's vision for the Camberwell development

Architect’s vision for the Camberwell development

This is the first major work on the College for a generation, and will enlarge the existing 1970s building creating a new academic extension which will house a new lecture theatre, studios and library.

There will also be major alterations to the front façade of the building entrance and reception on Peckham Road, making the building fully accessible, as well as a new gallery and courtyard area.

Additionally, the current site is being expanded, with brand new UAL student accommodation being built to further enhance the campus feel.

Camberwell College of Arts, one of UAL’s six world-renowned Colleges, attracts students from all over the world who go onto become some of the leading artists of their generation. Illustrious alumni of the College include painters Howard Hodgkin, Terry Frost, Maggi Hambling and Gillian Ayres; filmmaker Mike Leigh and musicians Florence Welch and Syd Barrett.

Nigel Carrington, UAL Vice-Chancellor, said: “Camberwell College of Arts has been at the heart of the community for nearly 120 years. UAL is delighted to contribute to the arts-led regeneration of Camberwell through this major investment in our college’s facilities and the building of 264 new student rooms.”

The project has been designed by RIBA award-winning Stephen Marshall Architects.

Drawing of the new facade at Camberwell College of Arts

Drawing of the new facade at Camberwell College of Arts

The announcement of this development follows news last month that an award-winning architecture practice has been chosen to design UAL’s new campus for London College of Fashion on Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park in Stratford. The new campus will bring together London College of Fashion’s 6,500 students and staff for the first time in the College’s 100 year history.


Pride Heroes

Pride Parade London photograph Alex Simmons
Professor Dominic Janes reflects on the LGBT Pride month 2015 theme, pride heroes.

“There are of course many lgbtq heroes and many will be named in the course of Pride week in London. However, heroism takes many forms, not all of which get the publicity they deserve. In Westminster Abbey there is the tomb of the unknown warrior. I would therefore like to advocate the idea not of a tomb but of a living, shouting, parading memorial to those millions of lgbtq heroes who are, or were, only known to smaller circles of friends, lovers and colleagues.

It is important, I think, to focus not just on those who were, in contemporary terms, out and proud, but also many others who were what we might call ‘in the closet’. They found ways, more or less easily, to cope with the pressures of a society in which prejudice was rife. I am, in particular, thinking about those who have attempted to reconcile their sexual identity with their religious beliefs. In recent research that I have been carrying out I have been exploring lives lived in the ecclesiastical closet which had formed so as to construct a place in which to contain same-sex desire and to display its signs in coded forms decipherable to those in the know.

This meant that some churches in the earlier part of the twentieth century were able to provide a degree of safety and community in a time of rising homophobia. Yet, a closeted life of service to God and the community, however redemptive of personal sin, placed distinct limits on the further development and elaboration of queer self-expression. In the classic model of later twentieth-century gay liberation it was precisely through emergence from this closet interpreted as a place of religiously inspired repression that modern gay subjectivity was achieved. According to this viewpoint the duty of the closeted homosexual is to ‘come out’ and to emerge as unambiguously gay.

However, another way to look at things is to say that modern gay subjectivity was formed out of past queer cultural constructions. Because of the long history of homophobia such cultural constructions of same-sex desire are partly and inherently derived from the experience of repression, secrecy and shame. So we should salute those heroes of the past from before the act of the legalisation of same-sex acts who attempted to reconcile social justice with the truth of their own personal desires.”

Dominic Janes is UAL Professor of Cultural and Visual Studies and the author of Visions of Queer Martyrdom from John Henry Newman to Derek Jarman (University of Chicago Press, 2015).

Dominic Janes Visions of Queer Martyrdom

On 25 June Dominic Janes presents Visual Arts and Queer Secrets, where he will be in discussion with three of today’s leading exponents of queer art history and visual culture, Prof. Whitney Davis (Berkeley), Prof. Jason Edwards (York) and Prof. Reina Lewis (UAL) to explore the continued importance of sexual secrets in the year that sees the 25th anniversary of the publication of Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick’s book Epistemology of the Closet. Find out more and book your place

The stars of Game of Thrones

Game of Thrones title
As Game of Thrones reaches the season finale we head to Drama Centre London, the prestigious alma mater of three stars from the cult series, to hear more about actresses Gwendoline Christie, Emilia Clarke and Tara Fitzgerald.

Contender for the Iron Throne Daenerys Targaryen is played by Emilia Clarke, who graduated from Drama Centre London in 2009. BA Acting Course Leader Seb Harcombe recalls:

“Emilia had this quality, as a student, which was very special and attractive – a kind of bright, spirited, devil-may-care gutsiness. She worked extremely hard to make the most of her exceptional talent, but always with a tremendous sense of humour, fun and brio that belied a deep and sometimes surprising inner strength and resilience. I remember her vividly, standing in the corridor one day after an intense rehearsal, laughing uproariously in a sparkly sequinned red costume ball gown. It’s absolutely no surprise to me that she has achieved so much, and  this combination of qualities – acting as if the world depends on it, but knowing of course that it doesn’t really –  is one that I try to instil in so many actors, going into a profession that can require so much persistence and positivity.”

In a Foreign Bed BA Acting Group 45  20082009 Emilia Clarke last on right  Photo Mark Duffield

Emilia has been nominated for an Emmy for Outstanding Supporting Actress for her role in Game of Thrones and was Vogue’s cover star this spring. She’s currently filming her next major film, Me Before You.


Gwendoline Christie has developed a major fan base playing warrior woman Brienne of Tarth on the show. A graduate of BA Acting at Drama Centre London, she reflects on her time as a student, saying: “The training is endlessly stimulating, exciting and tough. It provides realistic preparation, not just for the profession, but for life itself.”

Maggie, can you remind me? BA Acting Group 41 – 2004/2005 Gwendoline Christie at back  Photo: Mark Duffield

After walking the runway for Vivienne Westwood at Paris Fashion Week, Gwendoline will be back on screens later this year in Star Wars VII – The Force Awakens and The Hunger Games: Mockingjay Part II.

Their roles in Game of Thrones have seen Emilia Clarke and Gwendoline Christie nominated for Outstanding Performance by An Ensemble in a Drama Series awards at this year’s Screen Actors Guild Awards.

Annie Tyson, who taught both stars of Game of Thrones, recalls: “Both actors really connected and relished the demands of the training at Drama Centre and while they did not find it easy, as it’s a notoriously demanding course, they were completely committed and did some wonderful risky work. Both in different ways had real wit and imagination – I remember Emilia doing a monologue to camera and thinking how transparent her interior life was and I have a really strong memory of Gwen in an obscure Spanish Golden Age play being completely compelling and rather disturbing. Very different personalities but both with unique talent.”

The Country Wife BA Acting Group 41 20042005 Gwendoline Christie standing Photo Mark Duffield

Star of stage and screen and fellow Drama Centre London graduate Tara Fitzgerald joined the Game of Thrones cast in series 3, playing Selyse Baratheon. She’s just completed filming Legend, a major bio-pic of the Kray twins, set for release later this year.

The Game of Thrones season finale airs in the UK on Sky Atlantic. Catch more of Drama Centre London’s illustrious graduates on TV this season, including Gemma Chan in Humans on Channel and Helen McCrory and Tamsin Topolski in Penny Dreadful.

Read more about courses at Drama Centre London

View the schedule for Drama Centre London’s summer show written by Mark Ravenhill when the terror has ended the victims will dance

when the terror has ended the victims will dance

Search film and television courses at UAL


UAL’s Stratford development moves into next major phase

An award-winning architecture practice has been chosen to design UAL’s new campus for London College of Fashion on Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park in Stratford.

Allies and Morrison, in conjunction with RIBA Gold Medal winners O’Donnell & Tuomey and other renowned practices, have been chosen to design the new culture and university complex. The development is part of the ‘Olympicopolis’ scheme announced by Mayor of London Boris Johnson, on Stratford Waterfront in Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park.

An artist’s impression of chosen concept – final designs will be revealed later this year.

An artist’s impression of  the chosen concept – final designs will be revealed later this year.

The architects were chosen by a jury which included representatives from each of the institutions to be housed in the scheme, including UAL Vice-Chancellor Nigel Carrington.

It will bring together London College of Fashion’s 6,500 students and staff for the first time in the College’s 100 year history.

Nigel Carrington said: “We’re delighted to have Allies and Morrison on board for this project. They have a proven track-record of delivering iconic buildings in line with what we would expect for UAL. Over the coming weeks and months we will work with the London Legacy Development Corporation and the architects to make sure UAL’s requirements are met, revealing the final designs later this year.”

The new campus will include two major research centres focusing on sustainability and innovation in the fashion industry. It will provide widespread access to advanced fashion technology, business incubators, and a changing programme of public exhibitions.

The Waterfront site will also house new locations for the Victoria and Albert Museum and Sadler’s Wells. Discussions are also underway with the Smithsonian Institution to join the scheme by opening its first permanent museum outside the United States.

Mayor of London Boris Johnson said: “Stratford Waterfront is set to become a world leading centre of culture and higher education, and I am thrilled that we have been able to appoint some serious talent to work on the designs. Their work will be key to a project that is expected to generate nearly £2bn and bring 3,000 new jobs to the Olympic Park.”

New names to know at Art15

Thirteen artists destined to define the new art landscape will exhibit at Art15; selected from UAL’s class of 2014, the exhibiting artists are drawn from nearly 10,000 graduating students. At Art15 these rising star artists will appear alongside established galleries from around the globe, through SEE’s UAL Now initiative. Here, we bring you an exclusive preview of the work which will be exhibited at Olympia, 21-23 May.

Jon Baker, BA (Hons) Fine Art, Chelsea College of Arts
Jon Baker, Gape 58

Sophie Birch, BA (Hons) Fine Art, Wimbledon College of Arts
Sophie Birch, 9'03

Alexander Burgess, BA (Hons) Photography, Camberwell College of Arts
Alex Burgess, Gulf

Fiona Eastwood, BA (Hons) Painting, Camberwell College of Arts
Fiona Eastwood, Poised

Mia Faithfull, BA (Hons) Fine Art, Central Saint Martins
Mia Faithfull, iPad Series

Hiba Ismail, BA (Hons) Drawing, Camberwell College of Arts
Hiba Ismael, Curb

Jeff Ko, BA (Hons) Fine Art, Central Saint Martins
Jeff Ko, Yder Series

Jim McLernon, MFA Fine Art, Wimbledon College of Arts
Jim Mc Lernon, Orang Pendek

Ragna Mouritzen, BA (Hons) Drawing, Camberwell College of Arts
Ragna Mouritzen, Slice

Chloe Newman, BA (Hons) Photography, London College of Communication
Chloe Newman, End of Genesis

Miroslav Pomichal, MFA Fine Art, Wimbledon College of Art
Miroslav Pomichal, Green Figure

Daniel Silva, MA Photography, Central Saint Martins
Daniel Silva, UNTITLED [beeswax and wood]

Mette Sterre, MA Performance Design and Practice, Central Saint Martins
Mette Sterre, Hummelmania

Many of the selected artists have already attracted the attention of media, collectors, awards and prizes, including selection for the Catlin Art Prize, Saatchi New Sensations, and the Hans Brinker Painting Prize.

The works exhibited by UAL Now represent an opportunity to spot future stars and support emerging artists, offering an unrivalled chance to invest in pieces by the next generation of masters.

Stephen Beddoe said: “UAL:NOW at Art15 is a fitting legacy for our previous fine art showcasing programme, Future Map. The UAL:NOW stand will showcase some of the best new works emerging from fine art at UAL, launching the careers of some of our exciting new graduates to curators, collectors, buyers and audiences at the world class Art15 fair.”

Led by SEE, UAL Now is a showcasing and exhibition programme that highlights the most exciting emerging talent from University of the Arts London. UAL Now showcases recent graduates’ work at the best fairs and industry exhibitions across art, design and communication; in order to launch their work, products, ideas, services and companies. It enables and prepares them to connect to curators, buyers, collectors, manufacturers, agencies and specialist audiences, so that they can sell work, network and advance their practice and careers in the creative and cultural sector.

As an official partner of Art15 London, we have a special 2 for 1 offer on entrance tickets. Simply quote ‘UAL’ when booking online to redeem your ticket. Book your tickets

UAL Now at Art15 runs 21-23 March at Stand D4, Olympia, Olympia Way, London, W14 8UX. All works are available for sale, for more information or sales enquiries please contact

Take a six second tour of the stand at Art15 on Vine

See some the works on show at Olympia on Instagram

Read more about UAL: Now 

Search art courses at UAL



Thomas Tait takes Fashion prize in Designs of the Year

Thomas Tait

Thomas Tait’s fluidly tailored womenswear has won him the Fashion category for Designs of the Year 2015. The youngest ever graduate of Central Saint Martins’ MA Fashion, Tait has already attracted acclaim with nominations from the British Fashion Council for their Emerging Designer Award and NEWGEN sponsorship, as well as scooping the Dorchester Collection Fashion Prize as early at 2010.

The Design Museum announced this week that the Designs of the Year judging panel, which includes UAL honorary fellow Anish Kapoor and associate lecturer Hilary Alexander, had chosen Thomas from a shortlist of eight contenders for the 2015 award. Thomas’s AW13/14 collection secured him the nomination, which saw the designer send sportwear-influenced designs down the runway. Vogue described the collection as: ” It’s utility, it’s uniform, austere and slick and quite the palette cleanser… it was agility futurist.”

The Designs of the Year exhibition has been extended, now running to 31 March at the Design Museum.

Read more about Designs of the Year

Search fashion courses at UAL

Read more about the UAL nominees for Designs of the Year

UAL proud to be linked with all four Turner Prize 2015 nominees

All four of the Turner Prize 2015 nominees have studied, taught or carried out research at University of the Arts London (UAL).

The shortlist announced today reiterated UAL’s unrivalled reputation in the art world. Two alumni, three staff members as part of an art collective and one former staff member were all named in the shortlist.

The four nominees are artists Nicole Wermers, Janice Kerbel, Bonnie Camplin and the collective Assemble; one of whom will join the 12 UAL alumni who have already won the Prize when the winner is announced on 7 December.

Alex Schady, Fine Art Programme Leader at Central Saint Martins, UAL said: “We are thrilled that all of the nominees for this year’s Turner Prize have such a strong association with UAL. It’s exciting to have people connected with Central Saint Martins and UAL become so influential in the global art world. This not only represents our impact in this field, but very much reflects the ambition that we have for our students and that they have for themselves.”

Assemble Group Photo 2014 Assemble

Assemble Group Photo 2014 copyright Assemble

Assemble – a London-based art, architecture and design collective – counts among its members Maria Lisogorskaya, Mat Leung and Fran Edgerley who all teach on the BA (Hons) and MA Architecture: Spaces and Objects courses within the Spatial Practices Programme at Central Saint Martins, UAL.

Founded in 2010, Assemble seeks to address concepts of place making by examining the disconnect between the public and the process by which places are made and championing a collaborative, inclusive and cross-disciplinary practice.

Nicole Wermers Infrastruktur 2015, Installation view Herald St, London

Nicole Wermers Infrastruktur 2015, Installation view Herald St, London

Nicole Wermers, who studied MA Fine Art at Central Saint Martins, UAL, is nominated for her exhibition Infrastruckur, Herald Street, London.

Wermers creates sculptures, collages and installations which explore the appropriation of art and design within consumer culture.

Her installation Infrastruktur adopted the glossy aesthetics and materials of modernist design and high fashion, alluding to themes of lifestyle, class, consumption and control.

Bonnie Camplin, The Military Industrial Complex, South London Gallery, 13 - 15 June 2015 Photography by Ollie Hammick the Artist Cabinet London and South London Gallery

Bonnie Camplin, The Military Industrial Complex, South London Gallery, 13 – 15 June 2015
Photography by Ollie Hammick the Artist Cabinet London and South London Gallery

Bonnie Camplin, who graduated in Advanced Photography from Central Saint Martins, UAL, has been nominated for The Military Industrial Complex, South London Gallery.

Camplin’s practice, which she broadly describes as ‘the Invented Life,’ is characterised by the critique of existing power-structures, and spans the disciplines of drawing, film, performance, music and writing.

anice Kerbel DOUG 2014 Performed on 1 May 2015 in the Jeffrey Room, The Mitchell Theatre, Glasgow. Commissioned by The Common Guild, Glasgow Photographer Alan Dimmick copyright greengrassi, London and Catriona Jeffries, Vancouver

Janice Kerbel
DOUG 2014
Performed on 1 May 2015 in the Jeffrey Room, The Mitchell Theatre, Glasgow.
Commissioned by The Common Guild, Glasgow
Photographer Alan Dimmick copyright greengrassi, London and Catriona Jeffries, Vancouver

Janice Kerbel has been nominated for her operatic work DOUG, commissioned by The Common Guild at Mitchell Library, Glasgow

Kerbel previously worked on the editorial team of Afterall – a research and publishing organisation based at Central Saint Martins, UAL.

She borrows from conventional modes of narrative in order to create elaborate imagined forms. Her precisely crafted works often take the form of audio recordings, performance and printed matter. DOUG is a performative work which takes the form of nine songs for six voices.

The Turner Prize, often seen as deliberately controversial and the acid test for the ‘next big thing’, aims to spark public dialogue around the current British art scene.

First established in 1984 (and won by Camberwell College of Arts alumni Malcom Morely), the iconic award has graced the hands of a long list of UAL alumni including the likes of Richard Deacon, Howard Hodgkin, Gilbert and George, Patrick Caulfield, Richard Long, Antony Gormley, Steve McQueen and incoming UAL Chancellor Grayson Perry, to name but a few.

Meticulously short-listed to just four, each nominee represents a British artist under the age of 50 who has exhibited outstanding work in any discipline over the course of the previous twelve months.

The Turner Prize award is £40,000 with £25,000 going to the winner and £5,000 each for the other shortlisted artists.

Ones to watch from Foundation 2015

As UAL’s summer shows season begins, we share some of the highlights from this year’s Foundation Diploma in Art and Design graduating class.

Marlen Rau
Marlen Rau, Central Saint Martins

“In everyday life most objects we interact with go unnoticed, they serve their purpose and only get attention when faulty or broken. The aim of my project was to provoke reflection upon this relationship by confronting the user with a design inspired by the human body and human mannerisms. The Introvert Lamp is based on the posture of people who try to rest and shelter themselves from the environment by laying their heads down onto folded arms. When switched off, the fragile bulb is supposed to be pivoted down and to rest in a bespoke made depression within thick, protective concrete walls.”

Hannah Bottino
Hannah Bottino, Camberwell, Chelsea and Wimbledon

“For my final major project I was really captivated by plant life within the city. I wanted other people to feel the same way about urban greenery as I did. My goal at the end of the project was for the work to get people to look at urban greenery in a lovelier light. A book lent itself best to a subtle narrative of falling in love with urban greenery.”

Marlee King, Lewis Bush

Marlee King, London College of Communication

“Bowie’s Alphabet is a little homage to one of my biggest inspirations – Mr David Bowie. His love for influencing others through music is what made me direct my attention to him for my project. I adore the way he shifted so easily through his characters, and it fascinates me to watch clips of him perform and totally be immersed with who he is on stage. The screen prints you see are an eclectic mix of various characters I particularly love, such as Ziggy Stardust to the right, and the Thin White Duke with Jareth the Goblin King left. I wanted to assemble the prints as if they were part of a fanatic’s bedroom wall inspired by my own childhood room. The alphabet itself is illustrated through sound, with each letter found phonetically in his music. Put on the headphones and be transported to the mind and room of a Bowie fan!”

Thomas Fung

Thomas Fung, Camberwell, Chelsea and Wimbledon

“The idea of the work is based on the exploration of cross-dimensions,  I started my research through taking some photos in Oxford Circus, after that I deconstructed the photos into 2D drawing forms. After that, I make it as a sculpture in such form. For the strings I described it as the lights and the traffics in Oxford Circus. Finally the Light I applied is to make relationships between the exhibition site and my piece.”

Anne Elmhort

Anne Elmholt, Central Saint Martins

“I was inspired by the way, in which the main character, Alex, of A Clockwork Orange, befriends his reader; I’ve designed an immersive experience, where the audience move through a world coloured by Alex’s romanticised version of violence. Alex and his friends will coerce the audience to join them for a night of horrors. While being confronted with the hooligans’ lack of moral, the audience might find themselves in situations where their own morals are challenged.”

Linnet Van Veen photo by Lewis  Bush

Linnet Van Veen, London College of Communication

“The title of my show is ‘The Unspoken Truth’. I took inspiration from aboriginal art from the oceanic reign. Aboriginal art is consisted of abstract symbols, dots and lines. I decided to adapt this to the modern world, specifically social media sites. I explored the internet and social media sites for symbols that represented our fixation with it, as well as its influence on us. I took the symbols and turned them into patterns. I took the patterns and screen printed them over one another using vibrant colours.”

Ming Sau Wu
Ming Sau Wu, Camberwell, Chelsea and Wimbledon

“I have noticed that the surroundings actually are not like what we usually think they supposed to be. I have experimented with micro-lens to take photographs of my pet, I was shocked when I saw the detailed texture of her hair. I realised there are many interesting things in our life we would never notice because of their scale. I am also inspired by the films, Microcosmos and The Powers of Ten, as it changed the angle how we look at the world. Everything would change if the tiny objects become massive, and it makes me changed the attitude toward things. So I want to deliver this message visually to make people see the world in a different way.”

Babachuwe Tabase photo by Lewis Bush

Babachuwe Tabase, London College of Communication

“For my final piece called ‘Something out of nothing’ I considered sketching out my old walking frame as artwork that means a lot to me personally. My walking frame was a significant part of my life and artistic practice. I remember clinging portfolios on to my frame whilst I was struggling to walk and becoming an art project in motion. Hanging large bits of work on the handle bars to tying work on the back of my frame and completely utilising the space that was given to me. I had used it for eight long years and because of the intensive course I got rid of it. During my foundation I became stronger and more confident physically, mentally and emotionally to be able to live out my dream. I initially began by documenting my most memorable achievement with a large scale mixed media sketch, I reconsidered how a response any form of disability in general needs to be more discreet and subtle.

The outcome was four large A0 prints of an abstract and figurative interpretation of my walking frame. My work in itself is a celebration of how far I have come as an individual and an art student. By using O’s, U’s, the backs of I’s and exclamation marks I managed to create an abstract image of my Kaye walker. I planned to make it more figurative in the style of Tom Ekerlesley by using letterpress. I stopped looking at actual shapes of the Kaye walker and instead found myself concentrating on the negative and positive space. The medium of letterpress has more of a professional finish and it shows the smudges and detail of wrapped object. This is what I wanted my final piece to have because it shows how a wrapped object can be translated into figurative artwork.”

Nicolas Canal Tinius
Nicolas Canal, Central Saint Martins

“I started out by looking at the boundary between our consciousness and the physical world, comparing it to the boundary between our virtual lives and our physical lives. That developed into an exploration of the analogue and the digital, where I focused my interest in our recent tendency to over document our own lives. More specifically, I was interested in the amount of information that we hoard in the form of photographs and text, and how hesitant we are to delete anything. With that in mind, my project developed into an exploration of various interruptions to that seemingly inevitable thought process, which ended up taking shape as hole punched film. The most interesting, and unexpected thing that happened with that was the interaction between people in the photographs and the holes which ended up looking like voids in space.”

Fredrik Tjærandsen
Fredrik Tjærandsen, Central Saint Martins

“My garment is based on an obsession with seeing the Minions in everyday objects. I photographed my associations and from that I have been working on extracting information – putting it on the body and at the same time considering movement. I decided to work with playful materials in order to truly catch the Minion essence.”

Watch a video on the Minions project.

Samantha Ridgway
Samantha Ridgway, Camberwell, Chelsea and Wimbledon

“In my photography, I seek to capture the unfound beauty in the world.  Aftermath is a phenomenon I have adopted to represent my search of this unfound beauty. It is a term deriving originally from agriculture referring to the grass that grows again after the harvest. In previous projects I have captured the beauty of new life in devastation, desolation and death. This time, I decided to pursue darkness.  For my final project I wanted to roam the city at night when no one was around, when everything was still. I wanted to capture the feeling of isolation and darkness in a city that is so rich and alive showing that through darkness comes light, out of darkness comes beauty.  Life is made up of many difficult dark times but through those times, you grow stronger and more beautiful than ever before. There will always be happiness, there will always be light, but you are always in control of it. You are surrounded by beauty yet you do not see it. Close both eyes, open the mind. Only then will you feel it. Only then will you see it.”

Tamara Ibrahim photo by Lewis Bush

Tamara Ibrahim, London College of Communication

“The aim of the project was to convey the delivery of the lines in the film through typography, colour and screen prints. The idea for using only two colours came from when I created the first quote being “I know this because Tyler knows this” as my aim was to show the dual personality of the narrator. As I started taking note of quotes to use I found that the less I thought about it, the clearer the designs would be. To contribute to the simplicity of the designs, I thought it best to keep the colours to a minimum as the series of prints would look cluttered. I chose to challenge myself throughout this project as I usually go into plenty of detail in my final outcomes, however by sticking to using Helvetica I was able to play with layout and how the placement of text on a page has an effect on the viewer.”

Jessie  Heung

Jessie  Heung, Camberwell, Chelsea and Wimbledon

“I was first inspired by Cornelia Parker, Mona Hatoum and Wenda Gu, which they both created a starling atmosphere with lighting and shades surrounding in a space. Then, I created an installation of the reflection of shadow made by hair in a semi- abstract scale. The designs were influenced by the line composition of the construction buildings, which I discovered that outer beauty attracts, but inner beauty captivates. I do not view things the way men do but to investigate the unseen side of the beauty through darkness.”

Find all the information on this year’s summer degree shows on the dedicated site

Follow the shows on social media and share your favourite works with the hashtag #UALsummershows

Join the tweet out as the first of the BA summer shows open – on Tuesday 26 May at 11am share “See you at the #UALsummershows




Promote your work and the summer degree shows

The UAL summer shows site is now live listing the summer degree shows from each of the Colleges. Visit the website for all the information on who, what, where and when at Share the website link with friends and family and encourage them to visit the shows.

Promote your final year work on social media using the hashtag #UALsummershows

Follow the summer shows on Facebook Twitter Tumblr YouTube Instagram G+ Pinterest Periscope