Archive for the ‘Research’ category

LCC Associate Lecturer for BA (Hons) Sound Arts and Design at Tate Britain

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Iris talks to visitors at Tate Britain

Iris Garrelfs, a PhD student and Associate Lecturer on LCC’s BA (Hons) Sound Arts and Design course, recently held a week-long project at Tate Britain in which she used visitors’ personal objects and stories to create a sound installation.

Part of a Radio City residency at the gallery, ‘Listening Room’ encouraged adults and children to bring along objects and stories around the theme of hearing and listening from 2-6 February 2015.

Iris recorded the stories from Monday to Wednesday, edited the audio recordings on Thursday and created a sound installation for four channels and objects for everyone’s listening pleasure on the Friday.

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Some of the objects contributed by the public

The conversations between Iris and gallery visitors often expanded into very personal areas, focusing on childhood experiences or caring for relatives, while others were responses to exploring the sonic environment of the Tate.

Iris explains: “I was struck by the generosity of everyone, as people contributed so freely even very personal experiences.

“What came out of it for me was a kind of democratisation that happened through the stories – artists next to children, local residents next to Italian tourists. But there was also a blurring between museum visitors and myself: as I had invited people into the Listening Room, I also became a listener.”

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Exploring the objects used in ‘Listening Room’

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Listening to the installation at Tate Britain

A stereo version of the recording used in the installation was broadcast on Resonance FM and is archived here.

Read more about ‘Listening Room’ on Iris’s website

Read more about BA (Hons) Sound Arts and Design

 

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Faith and Fashion on the school run

Faith and Fashion school run

Panel discussion with Professor Reina Lewis of London College of Fashion, Claire Drucquer, a religious studies teacher and Patrick Moriarty, the Headteacher of JCoSS.

Context of the event

The premise that school uniforms encourage good behaviour among school students is unquestioned by many in the UK today. However what happens when dress codes ‘mission creep’?

Increasingly dress codes are being used to regulate the behaviour of teachers and parents as well as students in faith schools. In non-faith schools, local community norms can produce a de-facto dress code, policed by student peer groups in the playground and parents on the pavement.

About the speakers

To discuss what constitutes today’s school wardrobe, Professor Reina Lewis of London College of Fashion brings her Faith and Fashion series to JW3 to ask teachers, parents, and students if and how what they wear can cross the school gate.

To consider the nuance of school wear, Reina is joined by a panel including Claire Drucquer, a religious studies teacher who, as schools coordinator for Three Faiths Forum, works with people of all faiths and beliefs to build new intercommunal relationships, and Patrick Moriarty, the Headteacher of JCoSS, the UK’s first pluralist Jewish Secondary School who, himself training for ordination as an Anglican priest, has a keen interest in interfaith dialogue.

Event details:

Thursday 12th March 2015
18.30 – 19.30 - followed by a reception
JW3, 341-351 Finchley Road, London, NW3 6ET Please note that this event is not at our usual venue.

RSVP essential 

Find via Googlemaps
UNDERGROUND:Finchley Road (Metropolitan, Jubilee) and West Hampstead (Jubilee)
OVERGROUND:Finchley Road & Frognal and West Hampstead
BUSES: 13, 82, 113, 187 and 268

Further information:

Staging Disorder // Beate Geissler, Geissler/Sann

Geissler Sann by Lewis Bush

From ‘Personal Kill’, Geissler/Sann, photographed by Lewis Bush.

LCC’s current showcase exhibition Staging Disorder runs until Thursday 12 March 2015, and features work by high-profile photographers and sound artists responding to ideas of modern conflict and the ‘real’.

We asked Beate Geissler of exhibiting duo Geissler/Sann to tell us more about the pair’s project ‘Personal Kill’.

Tell us a bit about the work you’re showing as part of Staging Disorder.

‘Personal Kill’ depicts interiors of so-called MOUT sites – training installations for Military Operations on Urban Terrain, used to teach close-range combat. The work references a book entitled ‘On Killing’ by Lt. Col. Dave Grossman.

He writes, “In Vietnam the term ‘personal kill’ was used to distinguish the act of killing a specific individual with a direct-fire weapon and being absolutely sure of having done it oneself. The vast majority of personal kills and the resultant trauma occur at this range.”

The resulting trauma of a ‘personal kill’ is more severe than, for example, witnessing comrades or even family getting killed, since it is within the self that we find the source of the horror and not in the other. Something nobody can train an individual for.

Geissler Sann on right by Lewis Bush

‘Personal Kill’ by Geissler/Sann in Staging Disorder at LCC. Photographed by Lewis Bush.

What drew you to tackle the subject of staged conflict?

We were very interested in the simulating qualities of those training sites, their relation to reality and virtuality. The gamification and zombiefication that takes place, which is extending, bending and creating reality, was the focus of our research. It is a feeling like walking in a movie.

When we entered those tunnel systems, it felt like descending into the collective unconscious of western society. These are sites where soldiers are trained to pull the trigger on their opposite.

Friedrich Hegel describes the transition from natural being to social and cultural subject as a violent and traumatic one. He coined the term ‘night of the world’, which he defined as an irreducible dimension of the finitude of subjectivity.

It is the abyss of negativity, the night of the eye, glimpsed in the uncanny gaze of the Other. This is a form of imagination which is the radical negativity of arbitrary freedom.

What are you currently working on outside the College?

We just published a new book ‘Volatile Smile’, which investigates the impact of technology on systems of global commerce. We were interested in the mutual impact of real and cybernetic architecture, with Chicago as its archetype.

What made Chicago a centre of speculative culture — a culture which so rapidly emerged as the ‘non-place’ where cybernetic logic bears its strangest and perhaps most powerful fruits?

What do you think is the effect of holding an exhibition like this at LCC?

Maybe students get inspired, start to raise more questions and become aware that this culture of fear which was created in the last decades is something we need to change.

What advice would you give to current LCC students?

Don’t do shiny art for glossy people.

Beate Geissler is Associate Professor and Area Coordinator Photography, University of Illinois at Chicago.

Visit the Geissler/Sann website

Read more about Staging Disorder

The post Staging Disorder // Beate Geissler, Geissler/Sann appeared first on London College of Communication Blog.

Staging Disorder // Beate Geissler, Geissler/Sann

Geissler Sann by Lewis Bush

From ‘Personal Kill’, Geissler/Sann, photographed by Lewis Bush.

LCC’s current showcase exhibition Staging Disorder runs until Thursday 12 March 2015, and features work by high-profile photographers and sound artists responding to ideas of modern conflict and the ‘real’.

We asked Beate Geissler of exhibiting duo Geissler/Sann to tell us more about the pair’s project ‘Personal Kill’.

Tell us a bit about the work you’re showing as part of Staging Disorder.

‘Personal Kill’ depicts interiors of so-called MOUT sites – training installations for Military Operations on Urban Terrain, used to teach close-range combat. The work references a book entitled ‘On Killing’ by Lt. Col. Dave Grossman.

He writes, “In Vietnam the term ‘personal kill’ was used to distinguish the act of killing a specific individual with a direct-fire weapon and being absolutely sure of having done it oneself. The vast majority of personal kills and the resultant trauma occur at this range.”

The resulting trauma of a ‘personal kill’ is more severe than, for example, witnessing comrades or even family getting killed, since it is within the self that we find the source of the horror and not in the other. Something nobody can train an individual for.

Geissler Sann on right by Lewis Bush

‘Personal Kill’ by Geissler/Sann in Staging Disorder at LCC. Photographed by Lewis Bush.

What drew you to tackle the subject of staged conflict?

We were very interested in the simulating qualities of those training sites, their relation to reality and virtuality. The gamification and zombiefication that takes place, which is extending, bending and creating reality, was the focus of our research. It is a feeling like walking in a movie.

When we entered those tunnel systems, it felt like descending into the collective unconscious of western society. These are sites where soldiers are trained to pull the trigger on their opposite.

Friedrich Hegel describes the transition from natural being to social and cultural subject as a violent and traumatic one. He coined the term ‘night of the world’, which he defined as an irreducible dimension of the finitude of subjectivity.

It is the abyss of negativity, the night of the eye, glimpsed in the uncanny gaze of the Other. This is a form of imagination which is the radical negativity of arbitrary freedom.

What are you currently working on outside the College?

We just published a new book ‘Volatile Smile’, which investigates the impact of technology on systems of global commerce. We were interested in the mutual impact of real and cybernetic architecture, with Chicago as its archetype.

What made Chicago a centre of speculative culture — a culture which so rapidly emerged as the ‘non-place’ where cybernetic logic bears its strangest and perhaps most powerful fruits?

What do you think is the effect of holding an exhibition like this at LCC?

Maybe students get inspired, start to raise more questions and become aware that this culture of fear which was created in the last decades is something we need to change.

What advice would you give to current LCC students?

Don’t do shiny art for glossy people.

Beate Geissler is Associate Professor and Area Coordinator Photography, University of Illinois at Chicago.

Visit the Geissler/Sann website

Read more about Staging Disorder

The post Staging Disorder // Beate Geissler, Geissler/Sann appeared first on London College of Communication Blog.

Two Halves // Viv Albertine and William Raban

Two Halves Viv William

Two Halves is a regular feature spotlighting two people connected by London College of Communication.

Our aim is to showcase the conceptual intentions, deeper thinking and personal insights that come with the creative process.

If you would like to nominate someone for Two Halves, please email Natalie Reiss (n.reiss@lcc.arts.ac.uk).

VIV ALBERTINE

“Apparently mature students always try and over-achieve, we know this may be our last chance.”

  • Last year I slept a lot, rehearsed my band and played lots of gigs.  The year before that I finished my book and was the lead in a feature film. Every year is different for me and amongst all that I bring up my daughter, which is very improvisational and creative.
  • I write prose every day, not sure what it’s going to turn into. I make notes for songs, I’ve done some drawings but mostly I travel Britain and Europe promoting my book with readings at literary festivals. I want to communicate to as many people as possible, it took three years to write and I am proud of it.
  • I went to LCC 1984-87 and I did BA (Hons) Film. It took me a few years to get a portfolio together after being the guitarist in the Slits. I was a mature student and working, teaching aerobics at the same time. As I’d been in the music industry for seven years, I found the essay writing part of the course very difficult at first, but by the second year I was ok and became a bit of a swot.  Apparently mature students always try and over-achieve, we know this may be our last chance. I was grateful to be there.
  • I am a great believer in exposing myself to other disciplines, different to the one I’m working in, it’s much more inspiring and your work is less derivative.
  • I found collaboration in film very difficult because it watered down the idea.  It was very difficult to keep it strong and stay close to your vision, each department diffused the initial idea, misinterpreted it or there wasn’t the money.
  • If you make work that is honest and faithful to yourself, it will never date. It is scary and painful to do and it may not be recognised as good work for many years but you have to choose if you want to be an artist or an entertainer.
  • I was embarrassingly honest and I had a nervous breakdown after I handed (my memoir) to the publisher.  I had no hopes for it at all. I thought I would be a pariah once people read it. That’s how you should always feel when you make work in my opinion. Like you’ve gone too far.
  • I’ve only done four things, three albums and a book (I could count the way I used to dress in the seventies as it was groundbreaking, political and creative) and they have all transcended who I am.
  • I’m a great believer in the ‘fallow field’, lying dormant until an idea becomes so compelling that you can’t keep it in anymore.  That’s my way of working.  I’d rather do a couple of good things in my life than churn out a load of mediocre work. I’m not a careerist.
  • We had no TV, no books, no social life and no telephone when I was growing up – all I could do was draw.  I was often bored so both drawing and fantasising were my escape and they stood me in good stead.  I never run out of ideas, but sometimes, I concentrate on other things like love.

Viv Albertine’s memoir is Clothes, Clothes, Clothes, Music, Music, Music, Boys, Boys, Boys.

https://twitter.com/Viv_Albertine

http://vivalbertine.com/

 

WILLIAM RABAN

“Dream space is crucially important to any creative process.”

  • I am William Raban, Professor of Film at LCC and most of my time is committed to research both in terms of making films, supervising research students and doing all I can to develop an active college-based research community.
  • I have just finished a 60-minute film (72-82) on the first ten years of Acme Studios that includes pioneering installation and performance works shown at the Acme Gallery (1976–1981).
  • Acme Studios commissioned the film and they approached me because I had been a part of their history in the 1970s and I had documented on film some of the installations and performances shown in the Acme Gallery.
  • When I made Thames Film (1986) I began by being inspired by TS Eliot’s Four Quartets and his view of the river as a ‘strong brown god’.  Later, I discovered the Brueghel painting Triumph of Death in the Prado, which became the means for holding the film together.  It came to me in a dream where I saw the painting to the slowed down sound of Bach’s Matthew’s Passion, which is featured on the soundtrack. And of course, 72-82 is largely informed by artists who worked in painting, sculpture, installation and performance art.
  • The way I started making films in the early 70s invariably was a solitary process but I now depend upon help with specialist areas such as editing and sound.  I have collaborated with David Cunningham for the last 18 years on my soundtracks and he is brilliant to work with.  He is often quite critical of my ideas and I like that degree of resistance in the collaborative process.
  • The films about London and the River Thames have all been inspired either by being out on the river in a small boat or by walking the streets of London and just observing what goes on.  I find life on the streets so fascinating that I am not really interested in the artifice of a film studio.
  • LCC constantly surprises me. I have been here since 1996 but today I discovered the Heidelberg press in the printing department.  Whilst I have a pretty good idea about what goes on in the School of Media, I look forward to discovering more treasures in the Design School.
  • [On his first piece of art] I would say it was a large oil painting that I made when I was 17 – a view of the River Test in Southampton looking towards the distant Fawley oil refinery.  I got the paint to do what I wanted at the time but as I became older, I rejected its mimetic representation of a landscape and I am pleased to say it no longer exists – the paint having gradually fallen off through having been placed over the rising heat from my parents’ fireplace.
  • Island Race (1996), which was incredibly hard to finish because of its focus on the rise of the BNP.  I nearly gave up and am glad I didn’t because I think it remains a valuable document of that febrile time in east London.
  • Dream space is crucially important to any creative process. I have several ideas about what to make next but I am in a space where I need to dream the next idea.

William Raban is Professor of Film at London College of Communication.

http://www.arts.ac.uk/research/research-staff/a-z/professor-william-raban

http://www.lux.org.uk/collection/artists/william-raban

http://www.acme.org.uk/commissions/williamrabanfilm

The post Two Halves // Viv Albertine and William Raban appeared first on London College of Communication Blog.

Green Week: Fixing Fashion – Repair is the New Black

Bridget Harvey, Jumper: Fixing Fashion - Repair is the New Black.

Bridget Harvey, Jumper: Fixing Fashion – Repair is the New Black.

 

For UAL Green Week 2015, Bridget Harvey, CCW PhD student in the Textile Futures Research Centre (TFRC), invites you to experiment with mending your clothes and other textiles: customising them and fixing damage through patching, darning and adding new buttons.

In the UK we send over £200m of clothes to landfill each year. Mending can help keep these textiles in circulation, and help us love our clothes for longer. Learn hands-on skills for clothes mending – darning, patching and other small and simple mends. All the techniques can be done by hand, no previous skills or experience necessary.

Along with plenty of enthusiasm, all you need to bring with you are scrap fabrics or clothes with holes, stains, missing buttons etc!

Fixing Fashion | Repair is the New Black is part of Green Week 2015.

Friday 13 February
11:00 – 16:00
1st Floor – D1 Corridor
Central Saint Martins

Further information & contact:   Bridget Harvey website

TFRC and CSM Research sponsors: Studio Houndstooth launch of The Houndstooth Project

Studio Houndstooth

Studio Houndstooth launches The Houndstooth Project – a serious play, ludic, egalitarian project, which uses the well-recognised, houndstooth textile motif as the starting point for a public engagement making project for everyone and anyone as either individuals or as collaborators, using any media or approach, actual or virtual.

The launch will be a workshop to make freely with a range of materials and also provide the opportunity for participants to make links and to seek future collaboration and co-design relationships.

Date: 29  January 2015
Venue: The Crossing, CSM, Kings Cross
Time: Drop in anytime between 10.30am -5.30pm
Materials: All materials provided

www.thehoundstoothproject.com

Sponsors: CSM Research and Textile Futures Research Centre

Listening Room – A project by Iris Garrelfs for Tate Britain’s Radio City season

listeningroom

Monday 2nd February to Friday 6th February

For RadioCity’s “Listening Room” at Tate Britain Iris Garrelfs, PhD researcher at Creative Research into Sound Arts Practice (CRiSAP), London College of Communication invites you to bring along objects and stories around the theme of hearing and listening. These might be pictures, stones, sticks, in fact anything you would like!

Iris will be at hand to record your stories and will later edit the audio recordings to create a sound installation for everyone’s listening pleasure on the last day of the residency. Iris would be delighted if you could leave your objects behind, for others to enjoy and “play” on that last day.

For more information:

Professor Charlotte Hodes, LCF is featured in the forthcoming documentary

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Mirrors to Windows: The Artist as Woman

To be screened on 8 March 12:00, The Royal Academy

Charlotte Hodes, Professor in Fine Art, LCF, is featured in the forthcoming documentary ‘Mirrors to Windows: The Artist as Woman’ which will be screened on International Women’s Day at the Royal Academy on Sunday 8 March at noon. This is part of a programme of events to celebrate IWD at the RA that explore inter-generational perspectives on women in the arts.

Tickets and a ‘taster’ of the film

For more information:

charlotte 1

Call for chapter proposals: Handbook of Research on Global Fashion Management and Merchandising

propose a chapter

Handbook of Research on Global Fashion Management and Merchandising
A book edited by Alessandra Vecchi, (London College of Fashion, U.K.)
Chitra Buckley, (London College of Fashion, U.K.)
To be published by IGI Global: http://bit.ly/1xAyrPO
For release in the Advances in Logistics, Operations, and Management Science (ALOMS) Book Series
ISSN: 2327-350X

Proposal Submission Deadline: February 28, 2015

Propose a chapter for this book

The Advances in Logistics, Operations, and Management Science (ALOMS) Book Series provides a collection of reference publications on the current trends, applications, theories, and practices in the management science field. Providing relevant and current research, this series and its individual publications would be useful for academics, researchers, scholars, and practitioners interested in improving decision making models and business functions.

Introduction The Research Handbook of Fashion Management provides an edited collection of chapters on grounds theories, application and practices the field of management in the fashion sector. Providing relevant and current research, this publication would be useful for academic, researchers, scholars, and practitioners interested in improving their understanding of management within the context of Globalization in a highly volatile and creative environment.

Fashion management is multi-faceted discipline that within the context of Globalization finds itself at the intersection of the following related fields:

Fashion Entrepreneurship, Operations Management, Fashion Marketing and International Business.

Normally these fields constitute sparse bodies of knowledge within Fashion Management, however because of the heightened complexity of the current business environment they are becoming more and more complementary. As such an in-depth understanding of their interplay is not only necessary but it could also provide a useful interpretative lens to fully appreciate the value of Fashion management and its business practices in an era of Globalization.

As global fashion markets are becoming increasingly complex and their dynamics more and more interconnected, a broader understanding of fashion management is essential to anticipate unexpected change and to capitalize on emerging fashion business practices. This research handbook will focus on various dimensions of managing fashion businesses that are interrelated and complementary in a global context.

Objective of the Book

This research handbook looks to discuss Fashion Management research in the following related fields:

Fashion entrepreneurship, Operations Management, Fashion marketing and International business.

The handbook covers various sub-themes including visionary leadership, fashion technology, business model development, sourcing and supply chain management, operations management in fast fashion and slow fashion businesses, product innovation management, fashion brand management, digital strategies in the fashion industry, experiential marketing and branding in fashion and the internationalization of fashion firms.

Target Audience

The target audience of the research handbook will be a vast array of fashion management practitioners, academics and researchers who have a keen interest in the ever-changing dynamics of the fashion industry. The book would also be suitable to be used as a teaching aid in a variety of courses in different disciplines both at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Recommended topics include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Fashion management in a global perspective
  • The European fashion industry and the appeal of its heritage
  • Fashion entrepreneurship
  • Visionary leadership
  • Financial management
  • Fashion-technology
  • Business model development
  • Business incubation in the fashion industry
  • Operations management in the fashion industry
  • Fast fashion and Slow fashion
  • Sourcing and supply chain management in fashion
  • Product innovation management
  • Managing HR in fashion firms
  • The importance of CRM
  • Fashion buying and merchandising
  • Fashion marketing
  • Digital strategies in the fashion industry
  • The importance of CSR
  • Fashion brand management
  • Experiential marketing and branding in the fashion industry
  • The internationalization of fashion firms
  • Cross-cultural marketing
  • The emerging markets
  • Counterfeiting, IPR and legal issues
  • The global fashion industry and its emerging dynamics

Submission Procedure

Both researchers and practitioners are invited to submit a chapter proposal of 1,000-2,000 words clearly explaining the mission and concerns of their proposed chapter by February 28th, 2015. Submissions should be made through the weblink at the bottom of this page.  Authors of accepted proposals will be notified by April 30, 20155 about the status of their proposals and sent chapter outlines. Full chapters are expected to be submitted by June 30, 2015. All submitted chapters will be reviewed on a double-blind review basis. Contributors may also be requested to serve as reviewers for the research handbook.

Full chapters may be submitted to this book here: Submit a chapter
All proposals should be submitted through the link at the bottom of this page.

Publisher

This book is scheduled to be published by IGI Global (formerly Idea Group Inc.), an international academic publisher of the “Information Science Reference” (formerly Idea Group Reference), “Medical Information Science Reference,” “Business Science Reference,” and “Engineering Science Reference” imprints. IGI Global specializes in publishing reference books, scholarly journals, and electronic databases featuring academic research on a variety of innovative topic areas including, but not limited to, education, social science, medicine and healthcare, business and management, information science and technology, engineering, public administration, library and information science, media and communication studies, and environmental science. For additional information regarding the publisher, please visit www.igi-global.com. This publication is anticipated to be released in 2016.

Important Dates

  • February 28, 2015: Proposal Submission Deadline
  • April 30, 2015: Notification of accepted proposals
  • June 30, 2015: Full Chapter Submission
  • August 30, 2015: Review Results to Authors
  • September 30, 2015: Revised Chapter Submission
  • October 15, 2015: Final Acceptance Notifications

Inquiries can be forwarded to Chitra Buckley Graduate School, London College of Fashion
Tel: +44 (0)207 514 7578 Email: c.buckley@fashion.arts.ac.uk, chitra.buckley@wanadoo.fr

Dr. Alessandra Vecchi Graduate School, London College of Fashion, U.K.
Email: a.vecchi@fashion.arts.ac.uk, alessandra.vecchi@unibo.it

Propose a chapter for this book

To find related content in this research area, visit InfoSci®-OnDemand: Download Premium Research Papers: http://www.igi-global.com/infosci-ondemand/search/