Archive for the ‘Research’ category

Professor Reina Lewis interviewed by Islam Channel to give commentary on the growing spending power of the Muslim consumer

reina

Reina Lewis, Artscom Centenary Professor of Cultural Studies, London College of Fashion, was interviewed by the Islam Channel for a documentary about the Islamic economy to give commentary on the growing sector of fashion in the Islamic world.

The documentary will be repeated on the Islam Channel (Sky 806) on Friday 22nd August at 9pm (originally aired on Wednesday 30th July, 2014).

It is also now on YouTube and you can watch it via this link:

The Islamic Economy

Professor Reina Lewis’ research profile

LCC graduate photographer Max Colson awarded £15,000 grant from Leverhulme Trust

Max Colson 04

From ‘Hide and Seek: The Dubious Nature of Plant Life in High Security Spaces’

Recent MA Photojournalism and Documentary Photography (Online) graduate Max Colson has been awarded a Leverhulme artist-in-residency grant of £15,000 to work with the UCL Urban Laboratory.

Max will work at UCL with the Laboratory’s Director, Dr Ben Campkin, in a residency titled ‘Hide and Seek: The Dubious Nature of High Security Spaces’.

The residency will develop Max’s final LCC MA project, extending the photographic investigations of his photojournalist alter ego, the paranoid Adam Walker-Smith, into the UK’s hidden infrastructure of security design and control.

The project aims to heighten viewers’ awareness of the way that security design, surveillance and paranoia interact within the urban environment, also using humour to highlight the limits of photography as documentary evidence.

Natural Surveillance

From ‘Hide and Seek: The Dubious Nature of Plant Life in High Security Spaces’

We caught up with Max to find out more:

How did you become interested in the area of surveillance and security design?

I originally became interested in exploring how surveillance and security apparatus can be hidden within everyday public space. Delving into this area on my MA, I then became fascinated with highlighting the logistical and psychological difficulties of photographing ‘hidden’ security apparatus when one cannot easily tell where and what it is.

What do we need to know about your photojournalist alter ego Adam Walker-Smith?

Having discovered the landscape design programme ‘Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design’ (‘CPTED’), Walker-Smith realised that high security public spaces in London, which present themselves as being free and open, actually covertly guide behaviour through security design and monitor human activities through extensive surveillance infrastructure. The reason these things are not often observed is because they are carefully hidden and softened by the strategic deployment of vegetation.

This illuminating finding led to what could only be described as Walker-Smith’s intense paranoia as to the ‘innocence’ of all plant life in these spaces. His resulting photographs dramatically expose what he sees as the ‘suspect’ plants of securitised urban spaces (these plants are so-called for posing as ‘innocent’ decoration whilst actually being hidden parts of the security apparatus).

What does receiving this grant mean for you?

It gives me the financial freedom to focus on developing this particular project for a whole year, in collaboration with cutting edge researchers from UCL and other experts in the field of security design, which will culminate in an ambitious and immersive exhibition in Canary Wharf.

Also, as any artist will tell you, doing personal projects is an often solitary activity; when organisations support your projects like this it’s pretty incredible.

What direction do you hope to take your work in during your UCL residency, and beyond?

I’d like to develop Adam Walker-Smith’s investigation into the nature of hidden security design and present it as an immersive mixed media exhibition at Canary Wharf that makes people re-evaluate the public space that they use on a daily basis.

Photographic prints on a wall will be one element for sure but, in collaboration with built environment academics at UCL, I would like to create opportunities for the audience to engage with the project using a combination of interactive and audio elements; this will (I hope) bring the project, its exhibition and my photographic practice to the next level.

Tell us something you’ve discovered during Hide and Seek that surprised you.

Plants are incredibly versatile.

What most excites you most about the prospect of working within the UCL Urban Laboratory?

It’s a home to leading researchers engaged in the planning and design of the built environment; my work feeds on the research and critical ideas of these professionals, so it’s a fantastic opportunity to develop my work by being in such close proximity.

Which photographers or photojournalists working today do you most admire?

There are honestly too many to mention but I particularly enjoy the work of artists who playfully critique the nature of photographic documentation and/or its prevalence in the digital age, e.g. Joan Fontcuberta, Walid Raad, Mishka Henner, Taryn Simon, Thomas van Houtryve and Michael Wolf etc etc.

BW headshot

Max’s residency will take place across the 2014-5 academic year.

Read about MA Photojournalism and Documentary Photography (Online)

Read Max Colson’s LCC alumni profile

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Nathan Shedroff Gives Five Tips For Design-Oriented MBA Students

Photo Credit: Nathan Shedroff

Photo Credit: Nathan Shedroff

In our second guest-post by Nathan Shedroff, the program chair of the Masters in Business Administration (MBA) in Design Strategy at the California College of the Arts, Nathan fuels from the success of his course to share helpful insights. Here, he gives five tips for design-oriented MBA students.

1) Numbers aren’t that scary. What likely scares design students is the experience of dealing with quantitatively-focused people who think that the numbers ARE the story (and all of it) instead of just a part of the story that needs to be told. Numbers should never make the decision (and this includes “big data”) but they should inform decisions and designers can’t be afraid of what numbers say.

2) Designers go into design fields because they’re comfortable with the qualitative in life. Traditional business people (and most business students) go into business because of the opposite—they trust numbers and “recipes” and feel lost without them. That sets-up a natural dichotomy (or even conflict). But both are necessary for informed strategy and decisions, as well as execution. Designers can help their peers better understand the power and qualitative value (which FAR outweighs quantitative value and is actually what most business people are after—they just don’t realize it or know how to phrase it). And, since most of our business peers aren’t willing to learn our language or processes, it’s up to us to learn theirs and be the translators.
3) Designers weile an incredible amount of influence (which is, ultimately, where leadership lives) because they can communicate visually. I’ve seen designers excel repeatedly within teams of mixed skills and experience because they can sketch something others are trying to articulate. In addition, our presentations are often more clear and attractive and strategy is about storytelling, after all.
4) Many qual people enter traditional business programs thinking that business has to be dry and serious to be legitimate. It doesn’t. Most “natural” business leaders and entrepreneurs know that people and ambiguity are opportunities to play, explore, and find new opportunities that others don’t see. The three tips above should explain why. A traditional degree doesn’t confer legitimacy or quality in and of itself—even at a hallowed institution. Some of the most respected programs in the world are ridiculously behind when it comes to teaching contemporary leadership, collaboration skills, design thinking, systems thinking, or project-based learning (instead of reading and regurgitating past cases). Students should look for programs that feel innovative in curriculum, teaching methods, and environment if they hope to be equipped for success tomorrow. The past isn’t an armory for the future.
5) By all means, don’t go join a business program right out of an undergraduate degree. This isn’t like an engineering, medicine, or law degree. As much as you’re rushing to become the business leader or designer you want to be, business programs require some experience to work from. Five—or even three—years of work experience gives students materials and lessons on which to draw and learn. We’ve had students ranging in age from 23 to 60 in the DMBA programs and I’ve seen the same lesson played-out in other MBA programs, as well: students simply learn more and “get more for their money” the more experience they have before they enter an MBA program.
- Nathan Shedroff, Program Chair, MBA in Design Strategy, California College of the Arts
As always, we welcome your thoughts via our survey at the bottom of the CSM MBA course page.

 

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News // The Independent’s Ian Burrell speaks out at LCC PR conference

WK Ian Burrell

Ian Burrell, Assistant Editor and Media Editor of The Independent. © Warren King

LCC recently hosted ‘PR & The Visual’, a conference exploring identity, space and performance, organised by the Network for Public Relations and Society.

LCC’s Simon Collister and Sarah Roberts-Bowman led the all-day event, which was attended by international academics and practitioners and included a wide-range of talks, including keynotes from Brand Union’s Glenn Tutssel and The Independent’s Ian Burrell.

Burrell focused on the lack of champions in PR and the need for the industry to have better representation, citing the likes of Andy Coulson, Matthew Freud, Alastair Campbell and Max Clifford as examples of hindering figureheads in an already misunderstood profession.

“This year has been a public relations disaster for the PR industry…. Publicity-seekers like Clifford should never again be given the freedom to dominate the industry’s profile as he did,” said Burrell.

Academic speakers explored a range of visually-based topics including the presence of PR in pop culture, with Murdoch University’s Kate Fitch examining the representation of the industry in HBO series True Blood.

De Montford University’s Liz Bridgen looked at how PR can be conceptualised within the socially constructed field of ‘dirty work’, and Elon University’s Jessalynn Strauss explained how the physical space of Las Vegas’ mob museum is adopted as a PR tactic.

The conference dissected successful visual PR campaigns like Wolfstar’s Flower Fireworks campaign for Interflora and Unity PR’s Lolz Not Trolls. Edelman’s Gavin Spicer discussed the logistics of their Halo 4 launch, which took over Lichtenstein to create a fully immersive brand experience.

Delegates also took part in practical workshops exploring the use of photography, film, infographics and Vines within a PR setting.

Watch the video //

Co-founder of the Network for Public Relations and Society, Simon Collister, said:

“Our ‘PR and the Visual’ conference has been a great success. We have brought together a range of international academics and practitioners to explore and discuss the challenges, limits and opportunities for public relations theory and practice.

“Feedback from delegates and speakers confirms what we suspected when planning the event: academic and practitioners need to think much more creatively when studying the field or planning campaigns. In hosting the event we’re confident we have opened a new chapter in PR scholarship and practice.”

Read the Storify of the event

WK delegates

© Warren King

Read about BA Public Relations

Read about MA Public Relations

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Caroline Till, CSM, TFRC presenting at Wearable Technology UX 2014 Conference

Caroline Till

Caroline Till, Course Leader MA Material Futures, Central Saint Martins and member of Textile Futures Research Centre will be a presenting at the Wearable Technology UX 2014 conference, which will be held at Central Saint Martins, 22-23 September 2014.

Caroline will be speaking about:

Devices in context: Trends in wearable tech and future materials

Exploring the work of the MA Material Futures, as well as some of the most exciting developments in future materials and wearable technology, framed by key trends impacting the global design industry

  • Data capture and analysis- personal and environmental
  • Visualising emotional response and connection
  • Spectacle and fantasy
  • Responsive and reactive materials for wellbeing

For information about the other speakers and topics covered: Conference details: http://wearabletechnologyux.com/wearable-technology-2014-program/

Follow the conference on Twitter using #wearabletech and @Wearables_Tech

MA Material Futures at CSM

Textile Futures Research Centre

Central Saint Martins Proposed Design MBA Shares Research

Business, Sustainability and Design Frameworks–insights into a DMBA.  Photo Credit - Nathan Shedroff

Business, Sustainability and Design Frameworks–insights into a DMBA.
Photo Credit – Nathan Shedroff

The proposed Masters of Business Administration (MBA) course has, over the past year, amassed a huge amount of research regarding the potential of creating a Design MBA  at Central Saint Martins.

We’ll be sharing with you some of the quotes we’ve gathered along the way, demonstrating that the idea of launching a business degree at an art school is very on point with MBA students, alumni, and business leaders. One of the subjects we tackled is that of how MBA graduates, past and present, should deal with flexibility and uncertainty. Here are some of the answers we received–we welcome your thoughts, comments and input via our survey.

• “Creativity. For the first time, in IBM’s survey of CEOs in 2010, a large number of them, around 60%, said that creativity and innovation was something they needed. There’s a huge knowledge base about design that has been absent from management education.” Management School Senior Academic, US

• “John Maeda says something like, ‘Artists ask question, technology creates possibilities, design creates solutions and leadership creates action’. That’s a summary of what an entrepreneur needs to cover.” MBA Alumnus

• “People need different ways of thinking in order to respond to the challenges of a no growth, no carbon society, dominated by non inclusive politics. I’m interested in design as a way of doing that, because designers use their brains laterally, contingently, accepting there is no one truth, accepting iterating as a methodology to move towards alternatives.” CSM Faculty Member

• “A focus on people’s experiences. I’ve realised from being in the entrepreneurial community in the Bay Area that user-centredness is so lacking in all aspects of business.” MBA Design Strategy Alumnus, US

• “Building organisation capable of innovating. The was for talent is expected to heat up for positions requiring high levels and more education.” GMAC 2013

• “Effective multi disciplinary building and working. Firms like GE, IBM and Philips are all struggling with talent and skills. The opportunity is to blend designers who are up-skilling to be equal and effective partners with marketing, engineering and new product development, and business and management people who want to access design innovation and creativity.” MBA Faculty Member, US

• “Design as a core managerial capability. Everything about a business has been designed: from how you answer the phone, to HR policy, to what the products and services are, to deciding what strategy to employ. And how they design is to look around, and find someone to rip off, which they call ‘best practice’. But that’s only relevant if what they do is sufficiently close to your situation to be applicable. If companies survive, it’s because they are unique. More and more, finding existing designs out there is not enough. You need to be capable of doing the activity. This is something that resonates with executives I talk to.” Management School Senior Academic, US

If you agree, or disagree, with any of these statements, you can have your input by filling out our survey–a very important step in the exciting development of this program.

More information:
CSM MBA
Stanford d.school
Innovation Management
Makerversity
ImpactHub
THNK School of Creative Leadership
KaosPilots

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Call for papers for a symposium to be held at the London College of Fashion in January 2015

London College of Fashion Archive Symposium 2015

A call for papers for a symposium to be held at the London College of Fashion in January 2015

Subject: Hidden in the Archive

Lobb uppers

LCF Archives: Unfinished shoe uppers: Lobb Shoemakers c1950s

London College of Fashion Archives invites proposals for papers around the theme of things hidden, lost, undiscovered, disposed of, discarded, edited and missing in archives (personal collections, ‘wardrobes’, design collections, museums, libraries, etc).  The Symposium is open to UAL staff and postgraduate and research students.

Themes could include:

  • Losing/lost things.
  • Editing a wardrobe or collection.
  • Hidden on purpose – magic, superstition, tradition
  • Hidden stories: oral histories and testimony
  • Curating loss
  • Things broken or destroyed
  • Missing narratives.
  • Discarded/ing things
  • Immateriality
  • Finding/found things

Proposals are welcome for 20 minute papers (each followed by 10 minute discussion).

To submit a proposal, please send title and abstract of about 300 words to Jane Holt at archives@fashion.arts.ac.uk by Monday 22 September 2014.

Take part in a worldwide filmmaking project with CSM PhD Student

 

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Iceberg Fernandez, a PhD student at Central Saint Martins is curating  NOW&HERE = EVERYWHERE is a Quantum Filmmaking project in which everyone internationally is invited to collaborate with the mobile phone in the co-creation of multi-screen video-collages re-creating simultaneous moments.

During the course of this project announcements are made with the date and time in which each moment is taking place.

To participate make a 30 second film with your mobile phone of the situation, a detail or the place you are at that precise date and time, and send it as soon as you can, along with the name of the city, by e-mail to: info@now-here-everywhere.org.uk

If you prefer to send your videos via WhatsApp please add this number +447449494812 to your contact list, letting us you would like to participate. Your number will not be shared with third parties or used for commercial purposes outside of the project.

All the participants will be acknowledged in the website. Only the video-clips produced at the announced date and time will be considered.

By participating in the project you are confirming that you have all the rights to publish the videos and you are allowing us their exhibition.

This is a non-profit research art project based at Central Saint Martins (University of the Arts London).

MOMENT 9 is online NOW!! Thanks all the participating artists for sharing your art of the everyday life, it is being a real pleasure collaborating with you!! If you didnt have the chance to collaborate this time, the next moment will be held on: FRIDAY 15th AUGUST at 14:00pm BST (London Time) [Set your Alarms!] Spread the word, invite your friends….. the more we are, the greater the SURPRISE!!

Study for a PhD at University of the Arts London

Join us for the next UAL PhD Open Evening

Research // William Raban’s ‘Beating the Bridges: Richmond to Dartford’ at Museum of London Docklands exhibition

Beating the Bridges still

Still from ‘Beating the Bridges: Richmond to Dartford’ by William Raban. 11’ 15”, 16mm/video, colour, 1998.

‘Beating the Bridges: Richmond to Dartford’ by filmmaker and LCC Professor of Film William Raban is showing in a film installation as part of the Museum of London Docklands’ current ‘Bridge’ exhibition.

The free exhibition, which draws on the museum’s art collections to consider the significance of bridges within the London landscape, is open now until Sunday 2 November.

As well as exploring how London’s bridges allow people to experience the city, the show looks ahead to projects such as Thomas Heatherwick’s ambitious ‘Garden Bridge’ proposal, playing with the ideas of destination and crossing and tackling the key debates surrounding London and its bridges.

William’s 1998 film follows the Thames from the wealthy suburbs of west London, past the familiar landmarks of Chelsea, Westminster and the City, to the industrial flatlands beyond Dartford Bridge.

The 30 bridges spanning this stretch of the river provide acoustic spaces filled on the film’s soundtrack by ambient reverb and a live percussion score.

‘Beating the Bridges’ is presented in its own screening room within the gallery and will show continuously every day.

IMG_7556

‘Beating the Bridges: Richmond to Dartford’ installed at Museum of London Docklands

Read more about Research at London College of Communication.

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The House of Worth: Portrait of an Archive

The House of Worth: Portrait of an Archive

The House of Worth: Portrait of an Archive by Amy de la Haye & Valerie Mendes

Professor of Dress History and Curatorship, and Centre for Fashion Curation co-director, Amy de la Haye has co-authored a book on the House of Worth Archive with her V&A colleague, Valerie Mendes. The book was 6 years in the making and is published by the V&A, where both have worked as curators.

Charles Frederick Worth was an English designer who made his mark on the French fashion industry in the mid 19th Century and is widely considered the father of Haute Couture.

Their monograph brings together hundreds of photographs selected from the V&A’s unique archive of over 7,000 official house records. The images used capture the Worth style and offer fascinating insights into the daily routine of the House. The book tells the intriguing story of their acquisition and their historical context, and describes Worth’s international clientele of elegant women of wealth and power, from Lillie Langtry and Sarah Bernhardt to the Duchess of Marlborough.

Read More…

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