Archive for the ‘Research’ category

Art & Design practice-led PhD work by Hena Ali on display at CSM

Come and see Hena Ali’s ‪‎practice-led Graphic ‪Communication Design ‪PhD research displayed in the Window Gallery at ‎Central Saint Martins (Design) Degree Show Two from 24th June -28th June 2015.

This could be a good chance to get a better understanding of the beauty of Art & Design practice-led PhD’s.

Also, its could be interesting for you to see how issues can be taken as strategic design opportunities; initiating points; how collaborative practice and context/s can be taken as a sustainable design tool for designing effective systems as innovation.

‘Graphic communication design practice for sustainable social advocacy in Pakistan: Co-developing contextually responsive communication design (GCD) methodologies in culturally diverse contexts’, Hena Ali, 2015

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Her PhD demonstrates the amazing potential of collaborative communication design practice to facilitate generate and enhance sustainable social engagement. The research establishes how design can effectively respond to issues as design opportunities and help sustain innovation by designing effective systems, through engagement within diverse contexts.

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The PhD specifically explores how social advocacy can be made sustainable in low-literacy contexts like Pakistan by drawing on graphic communication design practice. The exploration focuses an exemplary issue of garbage disposal practices in a low-literacy low-income community of Dhok Chaudrian in Rawalpindi, Pakistan. The practice identifies and engages vernacular graphic media, collaborative design projects and local communities through graphic communication design practice, to map and co-design effective graphics-based social advocacy interventions sustainable in Pakistani context. The resulting design models and the methodology is documented as transferable communication design schema of practice applicable in diverse contexts.

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Hena’s PhD work will be displayed in the Central Saint Martins (Design) Degree Show Two in the Granary Building Window Gallery , 24-28 June 2015.

Further reading

Inspired by Nature- Art & Science talk

Inspired by Nature- Biosensor research & bridging the gap to application at the Institute of Biotechnology.

Inspired by Nature- Biosensor research & bridging the gap to application at the Institute of Biotechnology.

Inspired by Nature – Biosensor Research And Bridging The Gap To Application At The Institute of Biotechnology

Talk by Dr Colin Davidson, University of Cambridge

15th June 2015, 5.30pm

CSM seminar room C303

Central Saint Martins, University of the Arts London, 1 Granary Square, London, N1C 4AA

The development of biosensors, sensors inspired by or incorporating elements from nature is a complex, multidisciplinary research field that has a huge impact on many aspects of our lives -­ but very few of even the best research ideas reach market. Dr Davidson will talk about research at the Institute of Biotechnology and how the ideas that will have the greatest impact are often the ones that consider design for application from the outset. The IoB has a track record in producing biosensors for use in a broad range of medical, industrial and consumer applications. Davidson will discuss their holographic sensors as an example of how chemistry and biology can be informed by nature and design (in this instance the wings of butterflies) for goal of commercialisation.

Colin Davidson is a Post Doctoral Biotechnology Scientist working with Professor Chris Lowe OBE, Director of the Institute of Biotechnology (IoB), Dept of Chemical Engineering & Biotechnology at the University of Cambridge. He studied at Lancaster University, Nottingham University and has developed and patented numerous technologies in microbiology, optics, physics, holography and chemistry, which have been spun out into multiple companies from the IoB.

Convener Dr Jenny Tillotson, Arts, Science and Technology Research Group, Central Saint Martins, University of the Arts London. All welcome but places are limited, so please contact Jenny Tillotson in advance  j.tillotson@csm.arts.ac.uk

Tara McDowell – Pure Information: Conceptual Art at the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design

Image: John Baldessari, I Will Not Make Any More Boring Art, the Mezzanine Gallery, Nova Scotia College of Art and Design, 1-10 April 1971

Image: John Baldessari, I Will Not Make Any More Boring Art, the Mezzanine Gallery, Nova Scotia College of Art and Design, 1-10 April 1971. Courtesy NSCAD University, Gallery Archives, Mezzanine fonds.

Talk by Tara McDowell

‘Pure Information: Conceptual Art at the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design’

Tuesday 26 May, 2-4pm,

Central Saint Martins, Room D113

In 1970, the coastal Canadian city of Halifax became an unexpected hotbed of conceptual art when a small art school, the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design, threw its doors open to a number of young artists who had decided that the idea mattered more than the object. Conceptual art often took the form of instructions, so it became an ideal vehicle for experimental education. Vito Acconci, Dan Graham, Lee Lozano, Yvonne Rainer, Simone Forti, Sol LeWitt, James Lee Byers, Lucy Lippard, Robert Barry, and many others retreated to Halifax for a time, and some especially influential conceptual artworks were made there. This lecture considers the Petri dish of Halifax circa 1970, and maps the everyday terrain that structured one of the most radical moments in the history of art. Rather than an aesthetics of administration or a politics of publicity, rather than artmaking as purely dematerialized, mechanized, or philosophized, imagine conceptual art circa 1970 as a site of draft dodging, game theory experiments, acid dropping, relational psychodramas, divisions and alliances, power plays, boredom, loneliness, and isolation at the end of the world. And all this at an art school.

Tara McDowell’s paper begins with a close reading of John Baldessari’s ‘I Will Not Make Any More Boring Art’ (1-10 April 1971), which was an exhibition at the Mezzanine Gallery, a small space founded in response to David Askevold’s Projects Class, an extraordinary experiment in conceptual art as pedagogy. Overall, her research has been into NSCAD as an expanded social site of making and showing, in some ways anticipating current hybrid research projects and spaces, albeit in a looser, less programmatic way. The Mezzanine is of interest less for any one exhibition that took place there – although shows such as Lee Lozano’s ‘Infofiction’ (27 January-13 February 1971) and Vito Acconci’s ‘Accessibilities’ (1-15 December 1970) perhaps stand out - and more for its relation to other forms of practice occurring simultaneously, with visual art, performance, teaching, printmaking and the NSCAD press all testing and nurturing each other.

Tara McDowell is Associate Professor and Director of Curatorial Practice at Monash University in Melbourne, Australia. She is Editor-at-Large of The Exhibitionist, a journal on curatorial practice and exhibition making for which she served as Founding Senior Editor, now published and distributed by The MIT Press. She holds a Ph.D. in the History of Art from the University of California, Berkeley and has held curatorial appointments at the CCA Wattis Institute for Contemporary Arts in San Francisco, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, and the Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art.

Anyone interested in attending this event from outside CSM should email Lucy Steeds directly for further details: l.steeds@csm.arts.ac.uk

Student Selected for Hong Kong Residency

Exhibition view of Excessive Enthusiasm: Ha Bik Chuen and the Archive as Practice, Asia Art Archive, Hong Kong, 2015. Courtesy of Asia Art Archive.

Exhibition view of Excessive Enthusiasm: Ha Bik Chuen and the Archive as Practice, Asia Art Archive, Hong Kong, 2015. Courtesy of Asia Art Archive.

Central Saint Martins has teamed up with Asia Art Archive, creating a new exhibition studies research residency in Hong Kong.

Asia Art Archive is a non-profit organisation that documents and makes accessible art from the region.

Alec Steadman, a student on our MRes Art: Exhibition Studies course, has been chosen through open competition as the first research fellow. He will travel to Hong Kong in July 2015.

Diverse artistic practices
Alec’s work looks at the diverse models of self-organisation currently being practiced and developed by artists in Asia, with a particular focus on the south-east Asian archipelago. As part of his residency, he will give a talk about this project.

Alec will be provided with flights, accommodation, a per diem and a modest honorarium.

More information:
MRes Art: Exhibition Studies

Holding it Together: Art Magazines, Then and Now

A reading of five issues of Studio International magazine by Jo Melvin (2015). Film still. Camera by Oliver Beatty

A reading of five issues of Studio International magazine by Jo Melvin (2015). Film still. Camera by Oliver Beatty

Holding it Together: Art Magazines, Then and Now

Artist Pages, Policies and Criticism

Panel discussion with Jennifer Higgie, Jason Farago and Jo Melvin (Reader in Fine Art Theory at Chelsea College of Arts), convened by Antony Hudek and Alex Sainsbury

Saturday 25 April, 3-5pm  

Jennifer Higgie (writer and co-editor of Frieze) and Jason Farago (writer and founding editor of the new art magazine Even) join Jo Melvin (curator of Five Issues of Studio International, Raven Row) to discuss some of the motivations, exasperations and ambitions behind art magazines from the 1960s to the present day, broaching such questions as: What conditions compel a magazine to get started and thrive? How do magazines create and serve networks of writers and artists? What does an editor do that a writer and curator cannot?

Presented by Raven Row at Whitechapel Gallery, to coincide with the exhibition Five Issues of Studio International at Raven Row, until 3 May.

Please click here to reserve your place via the Whitechapel Gallery website.

Tickets £8.50 full price, £6.50 concession

Whitechapel Gallery
Zilkha Auditorium
77-82 Whitechapel High Street
London, E1 7QX

The Horniman’s Hidden World

Mark Fairnington, Tyger Tyger, oil on wood painting, 35cm diameter, 2006

Mark Fairnington, Tyger Tyger, oil on wood painting, 35cm diameter, 2006

Horniman Museum project to reveal hidden taxidermy treasures with Mark Fairnington, Reader in painting at CCW.

There are now only two weeks left of the Horniman Museum’s crowd-funding project to help Mark Fairnington reveal the museum’s hidden world. If you’ve not yet donated please consider doing so, every penny counts.

Their project is to stage an exhibition of Mark Fairnington’s paintings alongside their inspiration, the Horniman Museum’s collection of hidden taxidermy treasures. These aren’t usually on display to the public but will be shown with Mark’s paintings in the strange and surreal forms that inspired his work, straight from the museum archives, and they need your help to make this happen. This week they gave followers of the project a preview of a new work by Mark, Okapi. This is a painting of the eye of a beautiful specimen which is the temporary star of the Natural History Gallery at the Horniman. You can see this fascinating painting and find out more about it on the Art Fund website.

Valerie Boulet, Head of Fundraising and Membership at the Horniman Museum, says about the project:

Supporters have the chance to own two of Mark’s beautiful eye prints of their very own,Tyger Tyger and Zebra, available only as part of this crowd-funding project. Donors receive rewards from as little as £5 and include limited-edition postcards, scarves and bags.

If we do not reach our target the exhibition will not take place. Please help make this exhibition possible by donating and sharing our message today, your help is very much appreciated.

Further information:

Donate to the project and choose your reward!

Jo Melvin, Reader at CCW curates Palindromes

JO MELVIN

Image credit: John Latham, Still and Chew invitation. Image copyright The Estate of Barry Flanagan, courtesy Bridgeman Art Library.

Palindromes looks at ’pataphysics and transactions between Barry Flanagan and John Latham, curated by CCW Reader, Jo Melvin.

2 April–17 May 2015
Opens Wed 1 April 6–9pm
Continues Thurs–Sun 12–6pm

Flat Time House, 210 Bellenden Road, London SE15 4BW

’Pataphysics provides a framework for dialogues between Barry Flanagan and John Latham. Defined by its inventor, the Symbolist poet and writer Alfred Jarry, as ‘the science of imaginary solutions’ ’pataphysics preoccupied Flanagan from the early 1960s before he enrolled on the Advanced Sculpture Course at St Martin’s School of Art in 1964. There he met John Latham, who was at that time teaching in the painting department, and discovered their shared interests; notably economic theory, linguistic systems, value systems, language structure, metaphysics, ontology and poetry. Both enjoyed serendipity and chance, which combined with a certain gnomic humour are catalysts for investigative, creative processes.

’Pataphysics is properly denoted with the apostrophe before the letter p, as if to close a previous speech mark and thus mark a metaphorical circularity, or to put it another way, an ending before a beginning. This circularity of intention is a primary characteristic of pataphysical thinking and is frequently symbolised by the spiral form. The movement is similar to the palindrome, which is a paradoxical forward-backward relationship.

This exhibition will illuminate Flanagan and Latham’s collaborative and shared concerns, beginning with the notorious Still and Chew happening, when the formalist critic Clement Greenberg’s recently published collection of essays Art and Culture was systematically chewed to a pulp in 1966. Flanagan’s catch phrase ‘examine the facts’ provides a curatorial key.

Find out more:

Contact:

Printmaking in Changing Contexts

Paul Coldwell: Symposium - Printmaking in Changing Contexts

Paul Coldwell, Material Things: Sculpture and Prints.

Symposium: Printmaking in Changing Contexts
30th April , 1- 3pm
Cartwright Hall, Bradford

In response to Paul Coldwell’s exhibition Material Things: Sculpture and Prints at Gallery II, University of Bradford (13th March – 7th May 2015) there will be an afternoon discussion about printmaking, past, present and future. Printmaking in changing contexts will be held at Cartwright Hall, Bradford on Thursday 30th April  (1 – 3pm).

The event will be chaired by Sonja Kielty (Curator, Exhibitions, Bradford Museums and Galleries) and Andy Abbott (artist and University of Bradford) and will include a presentation by Coldwell outlining his long association with printmaking and Bradford.

Further details: http://www.bradfordmuseums.org/venues/cartwrighthall/activities.php

Free event, all welcome.

Spaces will be limited, please RSVP: 01274 431212, cartwright.hall@bradford.gov.uk

A review of Material Things can be found on the following link:  CV: Material Things

UAL selected to host one of six debates celebrating 10 years of AHRC

University of the Arts London (UAL) has been selected as one of six universities to participate in a debate series celebrating the 10th anniversary of the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC).

Books and the Human

 The Medium is the Massage: An Inventory of Effects,  Marshall McLuhan, Quentin Fiore, 1967

The theme of the series is ‘The Way We Live Now’ and the debates will examine key aspects of the human world, the ways in which these subjects are changing and shaping our lives, and will explore the ways in which the arts and humanities can help us understand this changing world.

UAL was selected from over 40 universities to take part in this prestigious series of events, and will be hosting its debate entitled ‘Books and the Human’ in December 2015 at Central Saint Martins. The debate will pose the question: what are the primary relationships between books and knowledge, and between books and human beings? This question will be addressed through expanded debates which draw together the fields of philosophy, history, politics, sociology, literature and creative practice. Additional events held at Central Saint Martins and other UAL colleges will explore how books are conceived, crafted, experienced and shared.

The debate series will be launched with the Curating the Nation debate on 11th  June at the British Museum and will run for several months, with further details to follow over the next few months.

Programme Director and Course Leader of MA Communication Design at Central Saint Martins Rebecca Wright, who was part of the team to put forward UAL’s application, said of being selected for the series: “We’re delighted that UAL has been chosen to take part in this debate series to celebrate ten years of AHRC. The Graphic Communication Design programme at Central Saint Martins has a long and rich history of association with typography and book design, dating back to 1896 as the Central School of Arts and Crafts. Hosting this AHRC national debate provides an exciting opportunity to explore the form, function and future of the book from the perspectives of making and thinking, integrating design with the wider humanities. Our interest is in how the book is intimately linked to the way we live now.”

Waste-Off and LCC’s Museum of Reinvention

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The Museum of Reinvention, Waste-Off, LCC, 2015.

This week marks the conclusion of the cross-University Waste-Off Challenge, a  project to give waste new value and help promote material reuse and sharing. As part of this the Museum of Reinvention is being exhibited at LCC.

Waste-Off was launched at the end of last year by the UAL research hub Conscientious Communicators with support from Stephen Reid, Deputy Vice Chancellor of UAL, who saw the project as an opportunity to “harness the passion to drive forward change”.

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The Museum of Reinvention, Waste-Off, LCC, 2015.

Teams comprised of students, academic and technical staff came together to collect material waste and via studio working and workshops facilitated by design-maker and UAL alumnus Jan Hendzel, created collaborative inventions.

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The Museum of Reinvention, Waste-Off, LCC, 2015.

The result was the generation of diverse and inventive projects from across London College of Communication, Central St Martins, Camberwell and London College of Fashion.

LCC students, staff and alumni created  two cabinets of reclaimed, up-cycled and reinvented objects – to act as a permanent showcase of inspirational examples, teaching tools and unexpected ‘creative curiosities.’ The aim was to demonstrate that salvaged items can have greater value, character and potential than virgin materials.

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The Museum of Reinvention, Waste-Off, LCC, 2015.

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The Museum of Reinvention, Waste-Off, LCC, 2015.

Sarah Temple and Tara Hanrahan, who conceived and managed the project, explain: “We wanted people to explore the creative potential of the discarded! To show by example what is possible and through this activity help establish practical processes for staff and students to share resources and avoid contributing to landfill.”

Find out more about Conscientious Communicators here.

 

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