Archive for the ‘University of the Arts London’ category

Meet Nick Sharratt

Nick Sharratt graduated from St. Martin’s School of Art with Graphic Design (BA Hons) in 1984.  He has worked ever since for a range of publications and authors, most notably for author Dame Jaqueline Wilson.  Not satisfied with his illustrious career as an illustrator, Nick has also turned his hand to writing, with a number of children’s books under his belt; Shark in the Park, Don’t Put Your Finger In The Jelly, Nelly! And What’s In The Witch’s Kitchen? To name but a few… 

Nick


Have you always been interested in illustration?
I’ve been interested in drawing and image-making since I was a toddler. I don’t know where that interest came from because I’m not from an artistic background, but my parents were always very encouraging. I became more specifically focused on illustration in my teenage years.

tracy beaker cover


How did you end up studying at Saint Martins? And what’s your favourite memory from your time there?

I did Art O’ and A’ levels at school, then a foundation course at Manchester Polytechnic (now Manchester Metropolitan University). When the time came to choose a degree course I went for Graphic Design at St Martin’s School of Art (as it was) because the college had such a good reputation and because I was keen to experience living in London. I studied Graphics due to the fact that in the early 1980s there seemed to be very few colleges offering degrees solely in illustration. My favourite time at St Martin’s was the first year. It all seemed very glamorous: we were in a sparkling newly converted building (an old banana warehouse) in Covent Garden and the projects we were set were fun and exciting. We had amazing visiting lecturers – legends in the design world, though I didn’t fully appreciate that at the time. As a bonus I spent the first year living in the wonderful Ralph West Halls of Residence, with a great view of Battersea Park from my room, cooked breakfasts every morning and even afternoon tea and cake on a Sunday!

I enjoyed the location drawing projects most; memorable days spent at Crufts Dog Show or Chelsea Pumping Station or sketching opera rehearsals at the London Coliseum. There were some impressive students on the course in the same year, who went on to do great things: David Ellis, one of the founders of Why Not Associates; Robin Derrick, former creative director of Vogue UK; David Turner, co-founder of Turner Duckworth; the painter Anne Magill and advertising creatives, John Gorse and Nick Worthington.

 

Tell us about your career since graduating?
I graduated in 1984 and have been working as a freelance illustrator ever since. It was a good time to start my career as there was plenty of illustration work around, particularly editorial, which accounted for the vast majority of my commissions in the first few years. I worked for a wide number of magazines, covering every subject from accountancy to yoga.  Cosmopolitan were particularly good to me and labelled me their ‘favourite cartoonist’. Alongside this I did packaging designs for Marks and Spencer, got the odd advertising commission and undertook a fair amount of work for the educational wing of Oxford University Press.

I finally got my foot in the door of the children’s books world when a designer from the trade section of Oxford University Press noticed my work and suggested me for a picture book poetry anthology. That first book led to another and then another. At the same time David Fickling, my original editor at Oxford University Press, moved publishers, put me together with the writer Jacqueline Wilson and gave me The Story of Tracy Beaker to illustrate. That was in 1990. By the mid-nineties I finally felt confident enough to devote all my energies to children’s books, writing them as well as illustrating other authors’ texts. I’ve illustrated about 250 books in total.

jelly 1


Do you have any tips for illustrators starting their careers?

When I left college finding work was a matter of phoning up magazine and book publisher art departments, making appointments and going in with the ‘folio, then hoping that the phone would ring – and that I’d be in to answer it! (I didn’t even have an answer phone to begin with). I’m sure what hasn’t changed is that you need to be highly determined and prepared to stick at it through fallow times. I know for many years I seized every work opportunity that came my way, no matter how small, and often one tiny illustration job would be a stepping stone to another slightly bigger, better job. For potential children’s book illustrators there are one or two excellent competitions, such the Macmillan Book Prize, that are well worth considering – they can really open doors.

 

What do you think the secret is to getting regular work as an illustrator?
You need artistic talent, obviously, but you’ve got to be reliable too, making sure you meet your deadlines and deliver the goods, which also means you’ve got to be prepared to put in long hours and work extremely hard sometimes. I think it helps to be flexible and willing to make certain changes if requested. And I’d agree with the opinion (voiced by John Vernon Lord I think), that an illustrator should believe they are capable of drawing anything – though what that can often mean in reality is doing some very crafty lateral thinking! Also, for a children’s book illustrator, the publicity side is increasingly important, so it’s good to be someone who can handle talking in public, at book events and on school and library visits. Meeting and talking with children in schools can be a great way to stimulate book ideas – several of my books evolved out of inspiring sessions with primary school children.

pants cover


What piece of work/project are you most proud of?

I feel proud to have been the illustrator of books by brilliant writers, Jacqueline Wilson in particular, but the greatest sense of achievement comes from doing it all – writing as well as illustrating. I’m proud of Shark in the Park, Don’t Put Your Finger In The Jelly, Nelly!, What’s In The Witch’s Kitchen? … But, I’m forever hoping my best work will be turn out to be the thing I’m working on at that time.

 

You have a touring exhibition ‘Pirates, Pants and Wellyphants‘ at the moment. Tell us about that…
The exhibition is going to be touring the country for the next few years. It’s come about thanks to an Arts Council-funded consortium of galleries in the north who want to produce exciting, inclusive exhibitions aimed at children and young people, at the same time encouraging local communities into greater interaction with their cultural spaces. They were after an artist with appeal over a broad age range, whose work would also link in with the promotion of reading and literacy. They thought I ticked the necessary boxes and I was delighted to be selected.

The consortium and Leach Colour, the designers, consulted me every step of the way and the resulting exhibition is even better than I hoped it would be. There are sections exploring different reoccurring themes in my book work, and areas showing how ideas evolve and the various ways I create my artwork. There are plenty of drawing activities for youngsters and lots of examples of the pictures I drew as a youngster – I’m particularly keen to encourage children in their own art.

JPMX-3378

‘Pirates, Pants and Wellyphants’ exhibition Image credit: James Mulkeen

 

Full information, a tour schedule and a short film of the exhibition’s drawing wall can be found here

Masters funding available for 2015/16 – applications now open for over 100 scholarships

Vice-Chancellor's Scholarships

If you are looking to study one of our Masters courses in 2015/16 you could be eligible to receive either a £10,000 award with our Postgraduate Support Scheme or save 50% on your tuition fee with a Vice-Chancellor’s Postgraduate Scholarship. Applications are now open for both schemes.

Postgraduate Support Scheme

If you are progressing from an undergraduate degree course that you started in or after September 2012 you will have been charged the higher rate tuition fee that has been applied since 2012/13. This, along with some other eligibility criteria including financial conditions, could see you able to apply for a £10,000 award to study one of our Masters courses starting in 2015/16.

Take a look at our Postgraduate Support Scheme web page for full details on who can apply and how.

Vice-Chancellor’s Postgraduate Scholarships

We have over 100 Vice-Chancellor’s UK and EU Postgraduate Scholarships available that see a 50% tuition fee waiver on our full-time Masters courses starting in 2015/16. You are eligible to apply if you have a personal income of less than £35,000 or equivalent in an EU member state currency and qualify for the Home/EU category of tuition fee status.

In addition there are 10 £25,000 Vice-Chancellor’s International Postgraduate Scholarships for applicants from low income economy countries to first pay the tuition fee for one of our full-time Masters courses starting in 2015/16, and then help contribute towards other costs associated with studying in the UK.

Take a look at our Vice-Chancellor’s Postgraduate Scholarships web pages to find out more and register your interest.

Other funding options

As well as these generous scholarships we also have a range of other scholarships, bursaries and awards pledged by the university, companies, philanthropic charities and private donators. Visit our postgraduate scholarships, bursaries and awards web page to find out more.

Over 100 scholarships available for 2015/16 Masters students – spread the word

 

Vice-Chancellor's Scholarships

To make postgraduate study easier to finance we are offering two different scholarship schemes for students undertaking Masters study with us in 2015/16. We have over 100 awards to grant. You can help us make sure they all get taken up by spreading the word to eligible students you are in touch with.

Postgraduate Support Scheme

If students are progressing from an undergraduate degree course that they started in or after September 2012 they will have been charged the higher rate tuition fee that has been applied since 2012/13. This, along with some other eligibility criteria including financial conditions, could see them able to apply for a £10,000 award.

Take a look at our Postgraduate Support Scheme web page for full details on who can apply and how.

Vice-Chancellor’s Postgraduate Scholarships

We have over 100 Vice-Chancellor’s UK and EU Postgraduate Scholarships available that see a 50% tuition fee waiver on our full-time Masters courses starting in 2015/16. Students are eligible to apply if they have a personal income of less than £35,000 or equivalent in an EU member state currency and qualify for the Home/EU category of tuition fee status.

In addition there are 10 £25,000 Vice-Chancellor’s International Postgraduate Scholarships for applicants from low income economy countries to first pay the tuition fee for one of our full-time Masters courses starting in 2015/16, and then help contribute towards other costs associated with studying in the UK.

Take a look at our Vice-Chancellor’s Postgraduate Scholarships web pages to find out more.

Other funding options

As well as these generous scholarships don’t forget we also have a range of other scholarships, bursaries and awards pledged by the university, companies, philanthropic charities and private donators. Visit our postgraduate scholarships, bursaries and awards web page for a reminder on all the options we have available.

SEE launches new and improved online content

SEE

Student Enterprise and Employability (SEE) has launched its new and improved web content this week, which is now live under the Student Jobs & Careers section of arts.ac.uk.

The new web content also includes the integration of SEE’s ArtsTemps and Creative Opportunities services to create a simple and coherent journey for all visitors, linking SEE’s online resources to related services.

Also, this redevelopment work means that SEE’s online content is now structured and labelled in a more intuitive way. New videos offer additional resources for users, while advice pages include step-by-step guides and downloadable checklists.

Visit the new SEE homepage and explore what SEE can do for you!

‘Creatively abled’ event leads to new ideas for dyslexia support

dyslexia

The ‘creatively abled’ event, held in January to highlight the package of support currently available to staff with dyslexia at UAL, has been deemed a ‘huge success’ by Disability Champion Natalie Brett. The event was held at lunchtime and provided the opportunity for staff from across departments to share personal experiences and discuss ideas for future support.

The event included a screening of Natalie’s animated message to staff with dyslexia, and a talk from artist Jon Adams who spoke about his experience of living with both dyslexia and Asperger’s syndrome.

Themed group discussions focused on individual strategies for coping with dyslexia, the positives of dyslexia, and accessibility issues affecting staff with dyslexia at UAL.

dyslexia

Natalie Brett, UAL’s Disability Champion, applauded the incredible creativity and resilience of staff with dyslexia and expressed her commitment to ensuring that the University creates a supportive environment for colleagues.

Katie Mills, Associate Director or Student Enterprise and Employability, said:

“Attending the creatively abled event was a revelation. I had no idea about the package of support and software available to dyslexic staff. I would recommend it to anyone with dyslexia – whether confirmed or not.”

dyslexia

The main proposals to come from the event were to

  • Set up a user-testing group for policies, software, and digital interfaces
  • Have default settings for documents and printing that would benefit all, not just those with dyslexia
  • Use video and animation more to communicate internally
  • Exploit mobile and tablet apps for assistive technology

Feedback from the event will be available on the Valuing Disabled Colleagues programme pages of the intranet.

For more information, feedback or ideas contact Nina Rahel (n.rahel@arts.ac.uk or x9864).

Call for papers – 21st Century Photography: art, philosophy, techniques

Conference image

Call for papers!

Deadline: 10 March

Conference dates: 5-6 June, Central Saint Martins

21st century photography: art, philosophy, techniques’ is a conference taking place on 5-6 June that seeks to address the re-birth of photography from a diversity of visual narratives and from the strange roles images get to perform in our world.

We invite submissions of 500-word abstracts for 20-minute presentations on the following possible themes:

  • Situating photography within the framework of contemporary philosophy
  • The aesthetics of repetition, reproduction and copy
  • The political implications of visual practices
  • New theoretical models for assessing contemporary image culture
  • Duration and temporality of the ‘still’ image
  • Sensorial and bodily experience of photography
  • Photography and the post-human
  • Theoretical dimensions of the idea of ‘representation’
  • Data, information and algorithms in the visual field
  • Archiving and curating the immaterial image
  • Augmented reality and immersive visual environments
  • Non-visual dimensions of photography

Submissions should be sent to Dr Daniel Rubinstein at photoconference@csm.arts.ac.uk by 10 March.

Selected conference papers will be published in a special issue of the journal Philosophy of Photography.

This trans-disciplinary conference aims to explore a series of themes that emerge from the understanding of contemporary photography as the basic unit of visual communication of the age of technology: online, off-line and between the lines.

The aim is to bridge the gap between aesthetic, philosophical and technological approaches to the photographic image and to prompt participants from different backgrounds (fine art, critical theory, philosophy, software/hardware) to engage with each other and to open new avenues for the critical interrogation of the roles of images in contemporary culture.

In the past decade, photography has gained momentum in public and private environments becoming one of the determining factors of contemporary life. The hyper-growth in various forms of digital imagery for screens provides a quintessential example. The triumph of the photographic image as the internally eloquent and profoundly apt expression of computational culture also provides a new philosophical lens upon which to investigate how representation affects norms of meaning-creation, and the ethical and political consequences of the acceptance of images as purveyors of truth.

Get active this year!

Arts Active

Arts Active is a Students’ Union project offering a range of weekly sporting and fitness activities for staff and students.

Staff and students can sign up for just £10 a year.

Different activities are on offer every weekday, including aerobics, table tennis leagues, swimming, running and urban cycling skills.

Continuous offers include swimming at Golden Lane LC (students only) and the opportunity to get fit with the UAL running group. Arts Active will also shortly be announcing a series of one-off events.

For a full list of events on offer, visit the Arts Active intranet page.

Facebook: Arts Active
Twitter: @ArtsActiveUAL
Tumblr: artsactive

Catlin Guide artists revealed

Mette-Sterre-Hummelmania-ongoing-performance-costume-made-out-of-30-kilo-rubberbands-2014-picture-by-Lovis-Ostenrik-setdesign-by-Robert-Wilson ©julianmommert
The forty artists selected for the 2015 Catlin Guide have been revealed, a quarter of whom are UAL graduates. Identifying “the most exciting new graduate and postgraduate artists from UK art schools”, the Catlin Guide selection is overseen by curator Justin Hammond in collaboration with leading gallerists, curators, collectors and course tutors.

The ten selected UAL alumni artists are: Helen Wilson, BA Hons Sculpture from Camberwell; Mette Sterre, MA Performance Design & Practice, Emma Corrall, MA Fine Art. Roderick Laperdrix, MA Fine Art and Lou Macnamara, BA Hons Fine Art from Central Saint Martins;  John Baker, BA (Hons) Fine Art and Sisters from Another Mister, MA Fine Art from Chelsea; Jisun Choi, MA Photography and Rebecca Scheinberg, BA (Hons) Photography from LCC; and Sean Patrick Mullan, BA (Hons) Fine Art: Sculpture from Wimbledon.

The Catlin Prize shortlist will be announced in May.

Read more about the Catlin Guide

Search fine art courses at UAL

2 sisters from another mister Fish Fight

Lou Macnamara 'WatchingTheWar' 2014 Installation 5 x 5 x 3 metres

Meet Anna Mokhova: Russia’s New UAL Alumni Group Co-ordinator

Anna Mokhova graduated from Chelsea College of Arts with an MA Interior Design in 2011. She is originally from, and lives in Russia, and is the co-ordinator of the new alumni group there. The group have just formed and are looking for UAL alumni to join them at their upcoming events…

 Anna Mokhova

 

What made you decide to come to London and study at Chelsea College of Art and Design?  And what specifically interested you about Interior Design?

I was recommended the Graduate Diploma course to explore an unconventional approach to interior design and shape independent thinking. Throughout the year I realised my interest in a particular theoretical debate within the discipline and moved on to the MA to work on my research. I was fascinated by the phenomenon of the sensual in perception of space, and I think this interest is still shaping my work.

 

What’s your favourite memory from your time at Chelsea?

Greatest of all was sharing days with my fellow students in the Chelsea workshops when creating work for the final show. This was a very inspirational period full of support from the local community of tutors, technical staff and friends from other MA courses.

 

What was the best thing about living in London? What one piece of advice would you give a student moving to London?

While living in London I met some incredibly interesting people and created industry connections. I value this experience profoundly. I would recommend anyone moving to London to be open to new people, ideas and places. Explore and learn as much as possible!

 

What have you been doing since graduating?

I moved back to Russia, where I gained some solid experience working in the interior design industry. Currently I am lecturing at the British Higher School of Art and Design in Moscow, and find supporting students during their creative development fulfilling and rewarding.

 

What has been your greatest achievement?

I hope all the great results are ahead, but probably the biggest achievement by now is being persistent in following my ambition. I hope in future I will be able to set up a project, which would positively influence the development of the design industry here in Russia.

 

What made you want to set up the UAL Alumni group in Russia?

I think it is important to keep in touch with other professionals within the creative industry. I believe forming a local community will provide space to connect for experienced professionals, and recent graduates from different creative spheres.  I hope the Group will become an environment for some great networking, learning and inter-disciplinary collaboration.

 

Tell us about the Russian alumni group… How do you visualise the group growing in the future?

We have recently had our first meeting, and this proved we already have really active members who enjoy collaboration and sharing. It was fun to meet and network within the group, but I believe it would also be interesting to work on events open to the public. Currently I have a couple of directions in mind, which I have discussed with other alumni, who are already greatly supportive of the initiatives. One of the directions is forming a space to hold a monthly contemporary debate in different disciplines, where group members could share their personal work and get feedback from other UAL graduates and the local creative community. As well as that, there is an opportunity to set up a larger annual event, which would be interesting for members of the public. This bigger event would allow UAL alumni to promote themselves and their work by sharing their expertise with visitors through talks, master classes, setting up sales and group shows. I hope we will get more graduates involved soon to make it exciting!

 

If you are interested in getting involved in the Russian alumni group you can get in touch here and follow them on Facebook.

 

National Student Survey – now open

National Student Survey

The National Student Survey is now open for all UAL undergraduate finalists.

The NSS is a very public, much reported-on public measure of student satisfaction, so scores are highly visible & used to rank us alongside other UK universities. It’s our chance to hear from our finalists about their whole experience studying with us.

Feedback from this survey is very important, so we have incentives for taking part – £5 goes to our Student Hardship Fund every time the survey is filled in, rising to £10 once 70% of students respond.

Students will be emailed from today, and need to know how important this is, so please promote the survey wherever you can and encourage participation among your students. Visit the NSS intranet page to find out what the survey is and how to promote it. Visit the National Student Survey website.