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BA Fine Art Graduate Shortlisted for Woon Art Prize

© Ana Gold

© Ana Gold

Having been shortlisted for the Woon Foundation Painting and Sculpture Art Prize, graduate Ana Gold’s work is currently on display at Northumbria University’s Gallery North.

Gold said: “I am delighted about the opportunities that the Woon Prize has to offer. It is an exciting competition as a young graduate, as a way to enter the art world and continue my education, especially after the productive and critical years at Central Saint Martins.”

© Ana Gold © Ana Gold © Ana Gold © Ana Gold

The prize was initiated by Mr Wee Teng Woon, a keen art collector and graduate of Northumbria University. Each year, his family’s foundation fund three major prizes and discretionary consolation prizes for final-year fine art, painting and sculpture undergraduates.

The first prize is a £20,000 bursary to fund a fellowship at BxNU Institute for Contemporary Art. The winner will have access to dedicated studio space and a high-profile mentor. Second and third prizes of £9,000 and £6,000 will also be awarded.

All the shortlisted artists’ work will be on display in the Gallery North until 19 September. Ana Gold will also be in a show at the Anise Gallery, London, from 28 September 2014.

More information:
BA Fine Art
Ana Gold
The Woon Art Prize

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Photos: Students Help Bring Carnival to the Tate

© Stephen Carter, XD Pathway Leader, BA Fine Art

© Stephen Carter, XD Pathway Leader, BA Fine Art

This weekend Up Hill Down Hall took place at the Tate Modern’s turbine hall. Our students and staff supported independent curator Claire Tancons in producing The Sky is Dancing, a performance offering critical and artistic perspectives on carnival.

The Fine Art students from the XD Pathway at Central Saint Martins also worked with the artists commissioned for Up Hill Down Hall. They helped produce works for the performances and in some cases created works themselves.

© Stephen Carter, XD Pathway Leader, BA Fine Art © Stephen Carter, XD Pathway Leader, BA Fine Art © Stephen Carter, XD Pathway Leader, BA Fine Art © Stephen Carter, XD Pathway Leader, BA Fine Art © Stephen Carter, XD Pathway Leader, BA Fine Art © Stephen Carter, XD Pathway Leader, BA Fine Art © Stephen Carter, XD Pathway Leader, BA Fine Art © Stephen Carter, XD Pathway Leader, BA Fine Art © Stephen Carter, XD Pathway Leader, BA Fine Art

The Sky is Dancing was inspired by extensive student research into the socio-political history of the Notting Hill Carnival and the politics of space and location.

It responded to wider critical debates about public art and ceremonial practices that relate to carnival as a cultural and artistic form.

More information:
Guardian preview
Student contributions
Tate website

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Drunken Painter Decapitates Mannequin Lover at Champagne Party

Salvador Dalí holding an artist’s lay figure (the chauffeur in the Taxi pluvieux), International Exhibition of Surrealism, Paris, 1938

A photo of Salvador Dalí by Denise Bellon. © Les Films de l’Équinoxe – Fonds Photographique Denise Bellon and Salvador Dalí, Fundació Gala-Salvador Dalí, DACS, 2014.

The dark tale of Expressionist Oskar Kokoschka and his stuffed girlfriend is just one of the stories explored by our second-year Fashion History and Theory students, in response to the Fitzwilliam Museum’s forthcoming exhibition.

Jane Munro, curator of Silent Partners: Artist and Mannequin from Function to Fetish, asked our students to respond to the exhibition, which explores the evolution of the artist’s mannequin. Through short videos, they looked at the transformation of the mannequin from inconspicuous studio tool to fetishised object.

Student Angelina Todd focused on the shocking story of Viennese artist Oskar Kokoschka. Kokoschka was devastated when his lover Alma Mahler aborted their baby, and he enlisted with the Austrian army to fight in World War One. When he returned home severely wounded, he found Mahler had married a former fling – Bauhaus school founder, Walter Gropius.

A waltz with a polar bear
In an unconventional attempt to rid himself of his passion for Mahler, Kokoschka ordered dollmaker Hermine Moos to make an exact, life-size replica of his ex-girlfriend. He wrote: “Yesterday I sent a life-size drawing of my beloved and I ask you to copy this most carefully [...] Pay special attention to the dimensions of the head and neck, to the ribcage, the rump and the limbs.”

Träumende by Umbo © Phyllis Umbehr / Galerie Kicken Berlin / DACS 2014

Träumende by Umbo © Phyllis Umbehr / Galerie Kicken Berlin / DACS 2014

It took Moos six months to fulfil this order. While waiting, Kokoschka took up with his serving maid, who carved his initials into her breast as a sign of commitment. When the mannequin finally arrived, Kokoschka was horrified to find that, far from life-like, it had furry limbs.

He wrote to Moos in disgust, saying: “The outer shell is a polar-bear pelt, suitable for a shaggy imitation bedside rug rather than the soft and pliable skin of a woman […] Even attempting to pull on one stocking would be like asking a French dancing-master to waltz with a polar bear.”

Beheaded in the garden
Kokoschka came to terms with the mannequin’s hirsute appearance, painting and sketching the doll as he once drawn Mahler. Rumours emerged about his trips to the opera with the mannequin, their long carriage rides together and their private rendezvous.

Eventually, Kokoschka was convinced that his custom-made muse had cured him of his passion for Mahler. He threw a big champagne party with chamber music, destined to be the mannequin’s last. Kokoschka wrote: “When dawn broke – I was quite drunk, as was everyone else – I beheaded it out in the garden and broke a bottle of red wine over its head.”

Other subjects explored by our students include France’s consumer revolution and the story of mannequin maker Pierre Imans. The exhibition, which features life-size mannequins, dolls and over 180 remarkable artworks from across the world, runs at the Fitzwilliam Museum from 14 October 2014 until 25 January 2015.

More information:
BA Fashion Communication: Fashion History and Theory
The Fitzwilliam Museum’s Silent Partners exhibition

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Gyo Yuni Kimchoe Scoops Fashion Scout’s Merit Award

© Gyo Kim

© Gyo Kim

Gyo Kim, who has is half of the award-winning Gyo Yuni Kimchoe label, has just graduated from the womenswear pathway of BA Fashion. His partner Yuni Choe makes up the other half of the label.

Having been named Fashion Scout’s Merit Award winner for the spring/summer 2015 season, Gyo Yuni Kimchoe will showcase their work at London Fashion Week in September. Their on-schedule catwalk show will be fully sponsored.

Speaking to Vogue, the duo said: “We are so honoured to be selected as the winner. The Merit Award is the best opportunity for new designers to show their vision and creativity.”

© Gyo Kim © Gyo Kim © Gyo Kim © Gyo Kim

‘An exciting approach’

Originally from Korean, Gyo Kim and Yuni Choe first met in New York. They then moved to London in 2011 to continue their studies. The couple’s concern about environmental problems, social issues and animal cruelty has led them to follow a philosophy of respecting life and nature.

Phoebe English, who was on this year’s judging panel, noted their work to be “very original with an exciting approach, you can tell they really enjoyed making their collection.”

Gyo Yuni Kimchoe’s eco-friendly, quirky and unexpected designs can be seen on schedule at the Freemason’s Hall in Covent Garden in September.

© Gyo Kim © Gyo Kim © Gyo Kim © Gyo Kim
More information:
BA Fashion
Gyo Yuni Kimchoe
Fashion Scout

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Nathan Shedroff Gives Five Tips For Design-Oriented MBA Students

Photo Credit: Nathan Shedroff

Photo Credit: Nathan Shedroff

In our second guest-post by Nathan Shedroff, the program chair of the Masters in Business Administration (MBA) in Design Strategy at the California College of the Arts, Nathan fuels from the success of his course to share helpful insights. Here, he gives five tips for design-oriented MBA students.

1) Numbers aren’t that scary. What likely scares design students is the experience of dealing with quantitatively-focused people who think that the numbers ARE the story (and all of it) instead of just a part of the story that needs to be told. Numbers should never make the decision (and this includes “big data”) but they should inform decisions and designers can’t be afraid of what numbers say.

2) Designers go into design fields because they’re comfortable with the qualitative in life. Traditional business people (and most business students) go into business because of the opposite—they trust numbers and “recipes” and feel lost without them. That sets-up a natural dichotomy (or even conflict). But both are necessary for informed strategy and decisions, as well as execution. Designers can help their peers better understand the power and qualitative value (which FAR outweighs quantitative value and is actually what most business people are after—they just don’t realize it or know how to phrase it). And, since most of our business peers aren’t willing to learn our language or processes, it’s up to us to learn theirs and be the translators.
3) Designers weile an incredible amount of influence (which is, ultimately, where leadership lives) because they can communicate visually. I’ve seen designers excel repeatedly within teams of mixed skills and experience because they can sketch something others are trying to articulate. In addition, our presentations are often more clear and attractive and strategy is about storytelling, after all.
4) Many qual people enter traditional business programs thinking that business has to be dry and serious to be legitimate. It doesn’t. Most “natural” business leaders and entrepreneurs know that people and ambiguity are opportunities to play, explore, and find new opportunities that others don’t see. The three tips above should explain why. A traditional degree doesn’t confer legitimacy or quality in and of itself—even at a hallowed institution. Some of the most respected programs in the world are ridiculously behind when it comes to teaching contemporary leadership, collaboration skills, design thinking, systems thinking, or project-based learning (instead of reading and regurgitating past cases). Students should look for programs that feel innovative in curriculum, teaching methods, and environment if they hope to be equipped for success tomorrow. The past isn’t an armory for the future.
5) By all means, don’t go join a business program right out of an undergraduate degree. This isn’t like an engineering, medicine, or law degree. As much as you’re rushing to become the business leader or designer you want to be, business programs require some experience to work from. Five—or even three—years of work experience gives students materials and lessons on which to draw and learn. We’ve had students ranging in age from 23 to 60 in the DMBA programs and I’ve seen the same lesson played-out in other MBA programs, as well: students simply learn more and “get more for their money” the more experience they have before they enter an MBA program.
- Nathan Shedroff, Program Chair, MBA in Design Strategy, California College of the Arts
As always, we welcome your thoughts via our survey at the bottom of the CSM MBA course page.

 

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