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Friday Feature // The LCC graduate helping Rio prepare for 2016

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A brainstorming session at the Committee developed by the Rio 2016 Digital Communications department.

After graduating from LCC’s MDes Service Design Innovation course in 2012, and with experience running an interaction design studio, Marcelo Albagli hoped to pursue a career as a digital communications and service innovation consultant.

When the Rio 2016 Organising Committee got in touch after a few months, he was delighted. Their digital communications department needed help in developing the strategic plan for the pre-Games period, but during his few months with the team, Marcelo began to realise the size of the project:

“In the next two years, the Games will involve 8,000 employees, 35,000 third party service providers, and 70,000 volunteers in the making. Rio 2016 will probably be the largest sporting event ever, with 15,000 athletes from 204 countries participating.

“Over 7 million tickets will be sold for the 64 Olympic and Paralympic competitions, and more than 20,000 media professionals are being expected in the city. It’s overwhelming”.

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Signing the ’2 Years to Go’ board

Marcelo decided that the digital communications strategy should be devised not through interviews with the leadership but during brainstorming and co-designing sessions with employees.

People from different departments were invited to generate ideas, beginning a collaborative creative process. These sessions allowed Marcelo to understand the Games from many different perspectives, while he and the team also researched the London 2012 and Vancouver 2010 Games.

Co-designing proved to be a powerful approach, translating the idea of social participation into practice. Marcelo adds:

“In my opinion, it is possible to say that co-designing served the Committee almost as an analogy for what we wanted to be doing online. These sessions also confirmed how highly motivated everyone was.”

Marcelo was then invited to write the creative brief for the development of Rio 2016′s digital channels during Games time and outline how proposals should be assessed. He also conducted brainstorming sessions to design the Olympic torch relay:

“We all have an idea of how the Olympic flame usually travels across the hosting country to finally light the cauldron in the main stadium of the Olympics. However, the torch design, who the torch bearers are, and which landmarks are highlighted during the relay, that is what needs to be realised and orchestrated to create a meaningful narrative.

“And from what I’ve seen in these sessions, where most of the participants were not members of the Organising Committee, I can tell how unique the relay has the potential to be in Brazil.”

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In the Olympic torch relay brainstorming sessions, most participants were from outside the Committee.

Marcelo has also been involved with the development of a mobile app for volunteers, the first test event in Rio – the International Sailing Regatta 2014 – and an education programme to help students communicate using digital media. But most centrally, his job is to plan and deliver the digital communications channels for the Games period.

Reflecting on the challenges so far, Marcelo points out:

“One needs to learn how to cope with frustration when helping to make the Games. There are many exciting opportunities to build something meaningful being revealed all the time. However, just as it is with any other project, regardless of its size, resources are limited and you can’t control everything. We work for the best, and we hope for the best.

“I learn something new every day, which is the most rewarding aspect of the job apart from having the opportunity to contribute to society in some way. Whatever direction you look in you will find something amazing.”

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Guanabara Bay, where Rio’s first Olympic test event, the International Sailing Regatta 2014, took place.

Read about MDes Service Design Innovation

Read Marcelo Albagli’s alumni profile

The post Friday Feature // The LCC graduate helping Rio prepare for 2016 appeared first on London College of Communication Blog.

News // Summer refurbishment at LCC

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Crated printmaking and letterpress equipment is moved by crane into the new studio spaces

It may be holiday time for many at LCC, but the College’s management and technical teams have been very busy relocating, revamping and reorganising in time for the start of the autumn term.

The major improvement works currently underway affect many areas of the building, but particularly the letterpress and printmaking workshops, which will now be located on the second and third floors of the Workshop Block, adjacent to the existing Heidelberg room (second) and print workshops (third).

There will be a full range of resources for different types of traditional printmaking, typesetting, book arts, textile printing, offset litho print and finishing.

The aim is for a more collaborative working model between areas which had formerly been spread around the building. For example, print and letterpress will now share the paper and chemical stores, and with around ten technicians in total between all disciplines, the areas will offer fantastic facilities and expert support to students and academic staff.

The letterpress staff are also taking the opportunity to sort, rationalise and update their typefaces before they set up home in a new space.

The heavy and delicate antique equipment has to be moved from one block to another by crane, stationed in the yard between the two blocks. Every piece of machinery is being packed into crates or onto pallets, picked up with the crane and set down on a platform on the appropriate floor.

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Part of a printing press is lifted into its new location

As many items as possible are being reused or recycled during the process, with even specialist sinks being preserved and transplanted to new homes.

Letterpress’s former studio on the lower ground floor of the Design Block is to be used by Foundation students for photography, as it is close to some of the College’s darkrooms, while the old printmaking area on the Design Block’s ground floor will be split into three studios for BA (Hons) Photography and BA (Hons) Production for Live Events and Television.

Also on the way are a new small TV studio suitable for TV journalism, green screen and animation on the lower ground floor of the Media Block, and a new blacked-out project space between the Main Lecture Theatre and the wood workshop.

The eighth, ninth, tenth, eleventh and fourteenth floors of the Tower Block are being redecorated, with new ceilings, new lighting and where necessary new carpets and blackout curtains. The Kit Room is being extended, which will facilitate a greater provision of equipment loans to students and staff.

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New outdoor furniture arrived at the College earlier this year

This is in addition to the new concrete benches and cycle storage installed in front of the College during the summer term.

Watch footage of the crane in action //

More detailed information about the summer works and room changes will be circulated to staff and students in due course.

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LCC Alumni in the 100 Archive

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A Place Is A Space We Give Meaning, Paul Bailey, 2011.

The 100 Archive is a community centred initiative to document and record the past and future of visual communication design in Ireland. It is a valuable resource which acts as a simple and transparent record of the professional activity, working practices, career paths, professional associates and collaborators of Irish designers.

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A Place Is A Space We Give Meaning, Paul Bailey, 2011.

The Archive houses an impressive amount of work from LCC postgraduate alumni, including three projects by our very own MA Graphic Design Course Leader Paul Bailey as well as work from Wayne Daly, Stephen McCarthy, Brian Heffernan, Niall O’Shea and Mark Shiels.

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# Magazine, Paul Bailey, 2013.

 

Brian Heffernan, now a senior a designer at design studio Aad in Dublin, talks us through his journey from LCC to 100 Archives:

“I had been a practicing graphic designer for nearly ten years when I returned to full-time education at LCC. My year on the Contemporary Typographic Media MA proved beneficial in ways I could not have foreseen.The course facilitated the development of new criteria by which work, both mine and others, can be assessed and this in turn has enabled me to identify the potential of my practice.

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Cork Midsummer Festival Program, Brian Heffernan, 2013.

“It’s a real honour to have my work included in the 100 Archive. As a practicing designer, I find being part of the pier group identified hugely beneficial. In this regard the archive is less about Irish identity and more about being part of something that recognises good graphic design, and that benefits everyone.

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Cork Midsummer Festival Program, Brian Heffernan, 2013.

“I think the archive provides a much needed focal point for Irish graphic design. Not only does it contextualise individual projects within a wider body of work, it contextualises Irish graphic design internationally. Having little by the way of legacy, the archive documents the path Irish graphic design has taken, and in doing so, shines a light on the road ahead.”

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DCU Student Support & Development, Brian Heffernan.

Read more about MA Graphic Design

Read more about Paul Bailey

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LCC graduate photographer Max Colson awarded £15,000 grant from Leverhulme Trust

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From ‘Hide and Seek: The Dubious Nature of Plant Life in High Security Spaces’

Recent MA Photojournalism and Documentary Photography (Online) graduate Max Colson has been awarded a Leverhulme artist-in-residency grant of £15,000 to work with the UCL Urban Laboratory.

Max will work at UCL with the Laboratory’s Director, Dr Ben Campkin, in a residency titled ‘Hide and Seek: The Dubious Nature of High Security Spaces’.

The residency will develop Max’s final LCC MA project, extending the photographic investigations of his photojournalist alter ego, the paranoid Adam Walker-Smith, into the UK’s hidden infrastructure of security design and control.

The project aims to heighten viewers’ awareness of the way that security design, surveillance and paranoia interact within the urban environment, also using humour to highlight the limits of photography as documentary evidence.

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From ‘Hide and Seek: The Dubious Nature of Plant Life in High Security Spaces’

We caught up with Max to find out more:

How did you become interested in the area of surveillance and security design?

I originally became interested in exploring how surveillance and security apparatus can be hidden within everyday public space. Delving into this area on my MA, I then became fascinated with highlighting the logistical and psychological difficulties of photographing ‘hidden’ security apparatus when one cannot easily tell where and what it is.

What do we need to know about your photojournalist alter ego Adam Walker-Smith?

Having discovered the landscape design programme ‘Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design’ (‘CPTED’), Walker-Smith realised that high security public spaces in London, which present themselves as being free and open, actually covertly guide behaviour through security design and monitor human activities through extensive surveillance infrastructure. The reason these things are not often observed is because they are carefully hidden and softened by the strategic deployment of vegetation.

This illuminating finding led to what could only be described as Walker-Smith’s intense paranoia as to the ‘innocence’ of all plant life in these spaces. His resulting photographs dramatically expose what he sees as the ‘suspect’ plants of securitised urban spaces (these plants are so-called for posing as ‘innocent’ decoration whilst actually being hidden parts of the security apparatus).

What does receiving this grant mean for you?

It gives me the financial freedom to focus on developing this particular project for a whole year, in collaboration with cutting edge researchers from UCL and other experts in the field of security design, which will culminate in an ambitious and immersive exhibition in Canary Wharf.

Also, as any artist will tell you, doing personal projects is an often solitary activity; when organisations support your projects like this it’s pretty incredible.

What direction do you hope to take your work in during your UCL residency, and beyond?

I’d like to develop Adam Walker-Smith’s investigation into the nature of hidden security design and present it as an immersive mixed media exhibition at Canary Wharf that makes people re-evaluate the public space that they use on a daily basis.

Photographic prints on a wall will be one element for sure but, in collaboration with built environment academics at UCL, I would like to create opportunities for the audience to engage with the project using a combination of interactive and audio elements; this will (I hope) bring the project, its exhibition and my photographic practice to the next level.

Tell us something you’ve discovered during Hide and Seek that surprised you.

Plants are incredibly versatile.

What most excites you most about the prospect of working within the UCL Urban Laboratory?

It’s a home to leading researchers engaged in the planning and design of the built environment; my work feeds on the research and critical ideas of these professionals, so it’s a fantastic opportunity to develop my work by being in such close proximity.

Which photographers or photojournalists working today do you most admire?

There are honestly too many to mention but I particularly enjoy the work of artists who playfully critique the nature of photographic documentation and/or its prevalence in the digital age, e.g. Joan Fontcuberta, Walid Raad, Mishka Henner, Taryn Simon, Thomas van Houtryve and Michael Wolf etc etc.

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Max’s residency will take place across the 2014-5 academic year.

Read about MA Photojournalism and Documentary Photography (Online)

Read Max Colson’s LCC alumni profile

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Mini Maker Faire interactive installation commission announced

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Paper Playscapes © Artemis Papageorgiou and Gabriella Mastrangelo, 2014.

The Elephant & Castle Mini Maker Faire is coming back to London this autumn, and the Digital Programmes team at the V&A recently launched an open call for the commission of an interactive installation to be exhibited as part of the Faire at London College of Communication.

The judging panel, including LCC’s Ben Stopher, have now announced that Paper Playscapes, a project by Artemis Papageorgiou and Gabriella Mastrangelo, will be commissioned from this open call.

Paper Playscapes is an open-ended installation, made and interacted with collaboratively by designers and visitors, representing a landscape in movement.

Visitors will be invited to join in assembling and creating the structure – then they can play!

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Sketches for Paper Playscapes © Artemis Papageorgiou and Gabriella Mastrangelo, 2014.

The modules that make up the piece are made out of corrugated cardboard, a sustainable cost-effective material that is easily assembled. Even though modules originate from pre-cut printed surfaces, and are therefore identical before assemblage, they are differentiated through folding and circuit-drawing.

Each cardboard module is designed to react to proximity and contact by emitting light through a series of LEDs placed on its surface. Little circuits inside the modules give them this interactive quality.

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Artemis Papageorgiou and Gabriella Mastrangelo, 2014.

The modules then become props in a game that is a variation on musical chairs. The final outcome is a landscape in the making, a participatory space for coming together for a few moments, in order to learn, make and play.

Come along and try out Paper Playscapes for yourself at the Elephant and Castle Mini Maker Faire on Saturday 15 November 2014 at LCC!

More info on the V&A blog

Visit LCC’s Mini Maker Faire page

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