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Did you study BA Print Management at the London College of Printing in 1976?

If so, your old classmate Steve Lee wants to get in touch to arrange a reunion…

LCP football team,1975/6 season

LCP football team,1975/6 season (Steve Lee is back row, second from left).

Here’s a photo of the 1976 London College of Printing which might help jog your memory!

If you were at LCP this year or know anyone who was and would like to get in touch for a possible reunion let us know –

Please pass this on to anyone you know who studied at London College of Printing and help us spread the word to find these lost alumni!

Meet: Alan Gubby

Alan Gubby studied BA (Hons) Digital Media Production at London College of Communication, graduating in 2008. He teaches media and film studies, but has also set up his own record label, Buried Treasure

Alan Gubby

What were you doing before UAL? What made you want to study at London College of Communication?
I was a music producer for several electronic and jazz music labels and also working as a part time music lecturer. I couldn’t progress further in my teaching career without a relevant degree. Because of the massive growth in the internet in the 2000s I decided to focus on digital media production and UAL / LCC was highly recommended, plus perfectly located in terms of industry and creativity.

Did you enjoy your time at LCC? What were your biggest challenges/achievements?
I found the academic environment inspiring and the resources at LCC were perfect, either using Apple Macs for design work or the library archives for endless research opportunities.
My biggest challenge was going through a divorce during my studies, but UAL was very understanding and supportive whilst I got my personal affairs in order. I had to work hard for my degree and got a 2:1, but my lecturers were understanding and supportive wherever they could be.

What have you been doing since? What advice would you give to UAL graduates wanting to find work in music?
After graduating in 2008 I went on to do a PGCE at Reading University and have been teaching media and film studies ever since.
I also set up the Buried Treasure label and have been releasing music by the BBC Radiophonic Workshop and other experimental electronic, folk and psychedelic sounds from the 1960’s and 1970’s.
My advice to students would be to soak up everything! Utterly absorb yourself in the university environment, go to as many lectures as possible, even ones not directly related to your course (if you are allowed). Make as many friends and contacts as possible because these people will help you throughout your future career and vice versa.

What are you working on now? And do you have any future projects in the pipeline
I’ve been writing a screenplay for a psychological thriller loosely based on the lives of Delia Derbyshire and John Baker, two hugely influential British electronic musicians. I’m putting on a musical version of the story at South Street Arts centre in Reading on November 14th. There are lots of performers involved including Pete Wiggs from Saint Etienne and Jonny Trunk. It’s pretty cosmic visually due to the occult 1960s subject matter. You can get tickets here.  I’m also about to release an album by The Dandelion Set featuring cult writer / graphic novelist Alan Moore who wrote V For Vendetta, The Watchmen and so much more.

What inspires you?
Musically I love film soundtracks that combine different disciplines and technology in unusual or inventive ways. Classical, folk, electronic, rock. It can be anything really and literally by anyone as long as there is something unique, emotional or boundary-pushing within it. In terms of the writing and research I do when compiling records I’m a bit of a revisionist. Often the official or accepted version of events is only one person’s version – writing sleeve notes allows the chance to present a different point of view and helps people make their own minds up.


Meet: Ashley Buttle

Ashley Buttle

Ashley Buttle

A huge congratulations to Ashley Buttle, who graduated from BA Photography at London College of Communication last Friday.  We met with Ashley to find out more about his time at LCC, his highly acclaimed final project; ‘This Space Contains Work’ and his plans for the future…

What made you chose to study Photography at London College of Communication?

I chose to study at London College of Communication because of a recommendation by an alum of then London College of Printing (now LCC), and because of its really good reputation.

When studying AVCE Art and Design, which was mixed media, I was always drawn to photography. So I studied FdA Photography at the University of Gloucester and then worked for a while. I felt like I wanted to go back and finish my studies, so I joined LCC in the second year.

Did you enjoy the course?

I loved the degree; I took every opportunity I could, including doing a semester in Bielefeld, Germany as part of ERASMUS.  This was really good experience that helped develop my way of working.

I especially enjoyed contextual studies, which was run by Paul Tebbs, who is a theoretical tutor.  He and the module really challenged my perceptions, and changed the way I thought about photography. We were lucky to have guest lecturers such as Craig Smith and Dallas Seitz, which helped give different opinions and perspectives.

What would you say the benefits of studying in London, and in particular LCC?

Studying at LCC has great proximity to galleries – Whitechapel gallery, TATE and Somerset House to name a few… It was also amazing to make use of all the facilities. Every part of my final project was created at the workshops in Elephant & Castle, including book arts, print finishing and reprographics. The graphic design of my book was also done by a LCC MA Graphic Design graduate.

LCC also houses the Photography Archive Research Centre (PARC), run by the well-respected academic, Val Williams who was also available for crits.  I was extremely lucky that Val agree to write the introduction to my book.

I also enjoyed the second year collaboration unit with the BA Sound Arts and Design students. It was in partnership with the National Gallery – one of the lead curators there gave us a brief where we had to respond to the works from the gallery – this was a great chance to work in a different manner.

Tell us about your final project This Space Contains Work…

This Space Contains Work

This Space Contains Work

As a bit of a troublemaker, I was keen to create a project that challenged the notions of the institution. The final major project consisted of a book (edition of 25), installation in two locations, and performance. It responded to photography in many ways without strictly adhering to the traditional ‘photo-essay’ or ‘photo-series’ format. As a result I created bodies of work whose purpose was only to be situated in the book, or a vitrine, and spoken about in the past tense. The work is described or illustrated, but never both at the same time. After completion of the book, copies were donated to libraries and institutions, so that now if you search me on the Tate library, you will find a copy of the book, or if you visit the Whitechapel Gallery Archives it is hidden on the shelves. Two copies were donated into the LCC library, and the Dewey reference code used to catalogue the book was used as the basis for the installation.

During the summer show a plinth holding a glowing plaque, with “709.2 BUT” laser-etched into the surface lay in a custom-built 3×3 meter white space, cordoned off with black rope. By following this clue into the library, you walked past a glass display cabinet, positioned beside other temporary displays of the LCC archive, offering some objects that are discussed in the book. Under shelf-mark 709.2 you could find the book, whose text explores memory, archive, reference, the visual, parody and pastiche. The project’s purpose was to respond to its surroundings, that of the educational frame, and the creation of work within a specified context. The 3x3m installation was positioned on the periphery of the main exhibition, between the main gallery, and the library. The introduction to the book was written by Val Williams, who discusses a project that is mentioned only in the introduction, and neither explained nor illustrated elsewhere, to further play with what can and cannot be explained, understood, or known.

What are your plans after graduation?

I feel like I have really developed from two years ago, the degree has been a steep learning curve.  After graduation I want to continue to work in photography and the arts, but not strictly taking pictures, more responding to images. I am also considering to further my studies.

New Course Discourse // BA (Hons) Information and Interface Design


Digital installation.

In our latest New Course Discourse feature, we chat to Programme Director Ben Stopher to find out more about the new BA (Hons) Information and Interface Design course.

So Ben, can you explain a little bit about the course and its aims?

Well this new course is highly digital and its design lead, so really the core of the course is about putting information design and interface design in this more digital context. There are three key specialisms that make up the course, UX and UI, data visualisation and graphic and information design.

If you’ve ever want to make websites, or build apps and data-visualisations, or even just something screen based and visual then this is the course for you.


Gephi network graph, Ben Stopher, 2015.

What can students expect from the course in terms of structure?

So in the first year you do graphic design, typography and information visualisation. You also do graphic design animation coding for the web, which is a really valuable skill to develop.

In year two you start to work in the user experience (UX) and user interface (UI) design studio, then you do interactive data visualisation and a major industry project. In both of these units we visit studios and also get live briefs from industry.

Why is this course unique?

It’s highly industry aligned and highly digital. We’ve offered this very specific area because there is definitely a gap. No one else explicitly teaches UX and UI design and no one else explicitly teaches interactive based visualisation so those three things are really unique to this course.


Gesture capture data visualisation, Ben Stopher, 2015.

In terms of careers and futures, where could this course lead its students?

You can be a UX designer, you can be a UI designer, basically anyone who wants to work with how things look on screen; phone apps, websites, any kind of digital interactive content. There’s tons and tons of work for people with those sorts of skills.

One of the main selling points of this course is that it is highly industry aligned, and designers that have those kind of digital skills – that can work with data – are going to be highly sought after.

The industry really struggles to find designers with that digital skill set – and so that’s partly why we developed this course.


Introduction to Infographics Workshop, 2015.

So what skills or qualifications are you going to be looking for in students?

We take students from foundation but we would also consider students straight from A level, if they know that they want to do digital design then we will look at their portfolios. Students will have similar qualities to applicants for Graphic Media Design, but also an awareness of what UX and UI is.

If you are an A level student who knows what those things are then you are highly likely to be a person that would be relevant for us to look at. I don’t expect schools to have a clue about the nuance of this course, but it’s about if the applicant has enough presence of mind to know what these things are, and thinks they might want to do them, then I’ll look at anything.

inter 2

LCC student with digital work.

Any last words?

It’s a super future relevant digital course. Graduates are going to be highly sort after because it isn’t a massive course, there are only 25 places. Students will get a brand new studio and a whole new team of tutors.

Find out more about BA (Hons) Information and Interface Design.

The post New Course Discourse // BA (Hons) Information and Interface Design appeared first on London College of Communication Blog.

From LCC to Hollywood, alumnus Henry Hobson talks to us about his work on the Oscars, his feature film and more

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Oscars graphics 2015, The Grand Budapest Hotel, Henry Hobson.

Since graduating from the BA (Hons) Graphic and Media Design course at LCC, Henry Hobson has gone on to make it big in showbusiness. From leading the graphic designs for the Oscars, to directing his own feature film ‘Maggie’ starring Arnold Schwarzenegger, Henry has worked his way to the top.

In the week that the first trailer for his Tribeca Film Festival-nominated movie is released, we caught up with him to find out a little more about his journey from LCC to Hollywood.

Can you tell us a little bit about your time at LCC. What were the most important lessons you learnt here?

I studied at LCC, or LCP as I knew it, for my Foundation course and BA. From the outset the focus on design was what drew me in, even on Foundation my tutors helped me explore the possibilities of design, and this was just before computers were becoming truly effective design tools.

Handmade and crafted techniques that I learnt, testing out colour and thinking critically meant that when I got to the BA I already had a shorthand in place.

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Oscars graphics 2015, The Imitation Game, Henry Hobson.

During term time I would do internships – I worked in my first year with Why Not Associates. I found the first couple of weeks a bit dull, but doing small tasks and little pieces of work helped me understand how valuable the creative experience I was getting at LCC was.

I learnt to push as hard as possible with projects, answering the briefs how I wanted to answer them. I learnt there is no incorrect answer if you have navigated to it from the brief. I still stick to that open way of thinking now, when a brief comes in.


The making of the Oscars graphics 2015, Interstellar, Henry Hobson.

Can you quickly talk us through your journey from graduation to where you are now in your career? Were there any key opportunities that you feel particularly grateful for? Formative experiences?

By the time I left LCC I had done so many internships that I was able to get a job at Why Not Associates almost straight away. I worked for them for years, before getting a place at the Royal College of Art. Whilst studying at a postgraduate level, I still found that my experiences at LCC, and the lessons I learnt there were fundamental in developing my ability to think creatively, even though they were hard to get my head around at the time.

What made you move to America, and is there a difference in the culture of design in the UK and the US?

The move to America came a little bit out of the blue, after my work was spotted. I found the design culture intensely different. Even my first week in the States when I was asked to pitch and I was presenting concepts and theories, the Americans wanted finished designs in the pitch not theories. The technical skill level is insane here.

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Oscars graphics 2015, Boyhood, Henry Hobson.

How did you get into films, and can you explain a little about what led you to your feature film, ‘Maggie’?

I chose LCC because of the late Ian Noble, who sat me down when I went to a D&AD event in Holborn. I wanted to study film and Ian convinced me that design was a secret backdoor into cinema, telling me that Hitchcock, Ridley Scott, Kirostami and others all started as designers, and that the British film industry is so closed off it would be so difficult.


The making of the Oscars graphics 2015, The Grand Budapest Hotel, Henry Hobson.

So my long game always involved film, using moving image and design as a creative outlet to try and tell stories. Why Not Associates had their foot in all sorts of doors and shortly before arriving I was able to be mentored by David Ellis in directing, going to shoots and being behind the camera.

I learnt the technical terms and ways of working and this allowed me the confidence when I moved to the states to tell bigger stories. It was a few of those bigger stories that led me to Maggie.

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Oscars graphics 2015, Birdman, Henry Hobson.

With your feet so firmly in both the graphic design industry and the film industry, where do you see yourself in 10 years’ time, how will you maintain that balance, or do you want to move more definitely into one area?

I love being in both areas! Creatively design allows for a more spontaneous outlet and film is the slow fix, you have to have immense stamina to build and work on films, because they take so long to make!

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Oscars graphics 2015, Maleficent, Henry Hobson.

What advice would you give someone graduating from a graphics course this summer?

I left LCC and my website was filled with conceptual thinking and graphic projects, which was an exciting position to be in. However, I soon realised that to get where I wanted to be I needed to tailor my portfolio into a language that design studios could see as applicable; to show proficiency in the core software and subtlety within my designs. My advice would be to keep this exciting conceptual stuff on your websites, but think about sectioning them off to show the different ways you can work.

Find out more about BA (Hons) Graphic and Media Design.

Read’s fascinating interview with Henry about his graphic designs for the Oscars.

Read’s interview with behind the scenes pictures of the Oscars graphic design process.

The post From LCC to Hollywood, alumnus Henry Hobson talks to us about his work on the Oscars, his feature film and more appeared first on London College of Communication Blog.