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LCC’s MA Interaction Design Communication students join The Trumpet for social media modelling

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Programme Director Ben Stopher and students map their social media habits

Students on London College of Communication’s MA Interaction Design Communication course recently took part in a social media modelling workshop run locally in Elephant & Castle by The Trumpet, specialists in crowd-powered change.

After taking over a unit in The Clarence Centre for Enterprise and Innovation, South Bank University’s business incubator and start-up hub, The Trumpet organised a series of community-focused events based around urban creativity. The first was Everybody Needs Somebody, run by designers and researchers Dr Kevin Walker and LCC alumnus John Fass.

Just as an architectural model shows the fine detail of a building development, a social network model shows how we are linked to the people closest to us. Participants in the workshop were invited to make tangible, physical objects out of everyday materials in order to build up a picture showing how people are connected to each other.

Each person was given a tile and was asked to stick coloured pins into it, connected to each other by coloured elastic, representing six people in their network. They then wrote short descriptions of how they knew each person. The finished artefacts externalised individual social networks, which can be difficult to see or understand as they are complex and change frequently, in a way that retained human values – and a sense of fun.

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Read about MA Interaction Design Communication

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Wear Your Clothes Inside Out and join students from UAL in support of Fashion Revolution Day

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Two students from London College of Communication and London College of Fashion are encouraging you to wear your clothes inside out for worldwide Fashion Revolution Day on 24 April and join in a day of action to raise awareness of the issue of ethical garment manufacturing.

Fashion Revolution Day, on the anniversary of the Rana Plaza disaster which killed 1,133 people when a factory complex collapsed in Bangladesh, aims to highlight the fashion industry’s most pressing issues, demand greater transparency in clothing supply chains and improve the lives of the millions of often vulnerable people who make our clothes.

“We want people to turn their clothes inside out, study the label, and ask the question: who made my clothes?” says LCC BA (Hons) Graphic and Media Design student Katie Baggs, who, together with London College of Fashion student Alice Bodgener, is coordinating a Fashion Revolution day of action on Oxford Street on 24 April.

“We want people to be aware of the working conditions of people that make their clothes, not to take things for granted. What happened at Rana Plaza should affect the entire fashion industry. We have a food labelling scheme in the UK, brands are happy to list the ingredients in their food. We know how our fish is sourced, why not our clothes?”

The day of occupation and activities, which Katie is keen to stress is “not a day of protest, but a day to ask questions”, will start at 8am at Oxford Circus and end with a “fash mob” [sic] on Carnaby Street in collaboration with ethical underwear makers Pants to Poverty.

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Perhaps one of the most surprising aspects of the Rana Plaza disaster was that, even a week later, many brands did not know whether or not they had been producing clothing within the building.

The theme for the first year of Fashion Revolution Day brings the consumer to the forefront and tell brands that they want to know who made their clothes.

People are encouraged to be curious about their clothes by taking pictures of their labels and sending them to brands on social media, asking them where they’re from. The hope is to create a global movement and inspire ongoing action, the way it has with Katie and Alice.

“My involvement with Fashion Revolution sprang out of a collaborative ‘Critical Mass’ project and exhibition for LCC Green Week,” say Katie.

“Researching Rana Plaza I was shocked by what I found and so the project was a response to that. We used giant washing label instructions to carry the message, in posters, and through an intervention in Oxford Street, speaking to people about sweatshop labour and raising awareness of Rana Plaza. With Alice, I have developed the design and the idea further for Fashion Revolution Day and we want to continue after that.”

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One way the action will continue is through the Evolving Fashion Society created by Alice and LCF students which will be encouraging interdisciplinary conversations and interactions.

“Our hope with Evolving Fashion is that it acts as a network to bring students who are already exploring sustainable practices together, to share ideas, collaborate and promote sustainability to a wider audience, both in UAL and beyond,” says Alice, who is a second-year FDA Designer Pattern Cutter student at LCF.

“The fashion industry is in dire need of a revolution, and Fashion Revolution and Evolving Fashion exist to support the next generation to make that change.”

How to get involved in Fashion Revolution Day:

Be curious and find out where your clothes are made…

Wear your clothes #InsideOut and Tweet: Today I’m wearing my (shirt/dress/T-shirt etc.) #insideout because I want to ask @ (brand/retailer) Who Made Your Clothes?

Support brands you know are creating ethical and sustainable solutions…

Wear your clothes #InsideOut and Tweet: Today I’m proud to wear my (shirt/dress/T-shirt etc.) #insideout because @ (brand/retailer) KNOW Who Made My Clothes.

Join Fashion Revolution Day on Thursday 24 April at Oxford Circus with UAL students, Pants to Poverty and the Evolving Fashion Society. See the Facebook group for where and when: facebook.com/events/220104868179904/?fref=ts


Further Reading:

fashionrevolution.org/about/why-do-we-need-a-fashion-revolution/

blogs.arts.ac.uk/csm/2014/03/31/fashion-revolution-day/


Social Media:

twitter.com/fash_rev

instagram.com/fash_rev

twitter.com/EvolvingFashUAL

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London College of Communication launches guest speaker series ‘Design Dialogues 20/20/20′

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Sennep described how their interactive installation ‘Dandelion’ found success at the V&A and Wired’s NextFest. Copyright Sennep.

LCC’s Dean of the School of Design, Professor Lawrence Zeegen, has launched a brand new series of informal guest presentations and conversations for the College’s postgraduate community and Friends of the School of Design.

‘Design Dialogues 20/20/20′ are an opportunity to meet and learn about UAL Chairs, Visiting Professors, Visiting Fellows and industry practitioners, learning more about their approach to design practice, design thinking and design research.

Taking place 4.30-5.30pm on selected Thursdays, the events follow a 20/20/20 format with a 20-minute guest presentation, a 20-minute Q&A session and 20 minutes networking.

The inaugural Dialogue took  place on Thursday 20 March and featured Matt Rice and Hege Aaby of interactive design studio Sennep. Matt and Hege told attendees about their ‘Philosophy of Trying Stuff’, describing how small personal projects have led to huge exposure for the studio and frequently a level of success that they could not have predicted.

Watch the Sennep presentation //

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Sennep’s iPad game OLO began life as an HTML5 coding experiment in studio downtime. Copyright Sennep.

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The commercial success of Sennep’s personal projects has secured them more client work, like this app for McKinsey & Company. Copyright Sennep.

Future Design Dialogues //

  • 24 July – TBC

Further details and RSVP information will be released nearer the time.

Read about LCC’s School of Design

Visit the Sennep website

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LCC and ArtsTemps join forces to pilot technical internship for LCC student

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Intern Sophie Chatellier at work in the College. Copyright Lewis Bush.

UAL’s temp employment service ArtsTemps, part of Student Enterprise and Employability at UAL, has joined forces with London College of Communication Technical Resources to create a unique student opportunity.

A 12-week technical internship open to LCC students and graduates is being piloted, as both the ArtsTemps and Technical Resources teams saw the benefit of offering a paid internship to a student or graduate keen to gain knowledge in the technical areas of the College.

ArtsTemps recognises the positive impact that on-campus work experience has on UAL students and graduates, offering working opportunities which help to develop employability skills and prepare students for careers in industry and the creative and cultural sector.

The two departments are both part-funding the intern’s salary to ensure that it is above the London Living Wage. The hope is that this pilot will be rolled out to offer more internships in the future.

The position proved very popular with students and graduates of LCC. Twenty-six applications were received within three days of the role being advertised, and a panel selected BA (Hons) Graphic and Media Design (2013) graduate Sophie Chatellier as the successful candidate.

Sophie has been placed in the Print and Finish department with Tony Yard and Scott House and is working two days a week supporting the area and learning essential industry skills.

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Copyright Lewis Bush

Read about BA (Hons) Graphic and Media Design

Visit the ArtsTemps website

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Exhibition // MA Graphic Design alumnus explores Croydon’s past in ‘Ghost Town’

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‘Ghost Town: The Hauntology of Croydon’ is curated by LCC alumnus Rob Mowbray

Opening on Saturday 5 April in London is an exhibition inspired by architectural ‘ghosts’ in the London Borough of Croydon and curated by MA Graphic Design alumnus Rob Mowbray.

‘Ghost Town: The Hauntology of Croydon’ celebrates the extraordinary post-war building programme that transformed the town. Croydon was so heavily redeveloped between 1956 and 1972 that for nearly 20 years, virtually nothing else happened. As a result, the concrete office blocks which dominate the area’s skyline also act as eerie memorials to a bygone age.

Much of the work on display at Croydon School of Art’s Parfitt Gallery was produced by Rob himself during his postgraduate research project, with other contributions including a triptych from LCC’s BA (Hons) Graphic and Media Design Course Leader Craig Burston.

The centrepiece of the exhibition is ‘The Sir James Marshall Psychogeographic Memorial: The Hauntological Convergence of Urban Planning, Free Enterprise and Ghosts… in Croydon’, in which Rob attempts to visualise the philosophical concept of hauntology by using Croydon as a case study.

Also on display are works including ‘Craterform’, a deconstruction of a newspaper Rob produced as part of a photographic architectural study, and ‘Looking Up’, taken from a psychogeographic study of Croydon’s high rise buildings using the 1970s picture postcard aesthetic.

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‘The Sir James Marshall Psychogeographic Memorial: The Hauntological Convergence of Urban Planning, Free Enterprise and Ghosts… in Croydon’

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‘Craterform’

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‘Looking Up’

Ghost Town: The Hauntology of Croydon
Saturday 5 April – Friday 2 May
Parfitt Gallery
Croydon School of Art
College Road
Croydon
CR9 1DX

Read about MA Graphic Design

Read our 2013 PG Shows preview of Rob’s work

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