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Journalism Guest Speaker Review // The VICE Vision of Journalism

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VICE’s Bruno Bayley gave the second talk in this year’s LCC Journalism Guest Speaker series. Image © Diana Tleuliyeva

On Tuesday 21 October, LCC welcomed Bruno Bayley, European Managing Editor of VICE for the second lecture in the Journalism Guest Speaker series. Third-year BA (Hons) Journalism student Diana Tleuliyeva reports.

Bayley’s lecture on the VICE vision of journalism was hotly anticipated by many – the audience ranged from UAL to City University and even Bristol University students. Everyone was intrigued to get an insight into the most provocative magazine in the country.

Since the time of its establishment in the UK in 2002, VICE magazine has undergone a lot of changes. It’s gone from being a magazine “hated for its humour” to being innovative in the way news and pop culture is covered.

“A part of my job is to make the magazine better without making it a different magazine. So, it’s about balancing, keeping that tone and the things people liked about it but actually improving the quality of it: better writers, better photographers,” said Bayley.

Bayley believes the video content on VICE has helped massively to change people’s perceptions about the magazine. A recent documentary about the Islamic State is one example.

“When I started working at VICE, there were only a few serious articles, but now we have documentaries and even a news channel. A lot of people will be surprised how VICE has changed.”

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A packed Main Lecture Theatre for Bayley’s talk. Image © Diana Tleuliyeva

VICE is known for championing the “immersionist” school of journalism and Bayley stressed this throughout the lecture: “I’d rather commission a story when someone says ‘I’m going to go to this place and do this’ rather than pieces written from a removed situation. Be immersive as much as possible.”

So, how do you get a job at a publication like VICE? Bayley recommends being proactive and useful in the workplace and doing as much work as possible.

“A lot of the journalists were interns who did well and then became regular contributors, usually progressing from the online version and then writing longer features for the magazine.”

Internships are advertised online throughout the year, giving opportunities to work for one of ten channels. Bayley himself started by writing reviews and conducting vox-pops for VICE in 2007.

Good engaging ideas are a part of the magazine’s DNA. Bayley explained: “We like to cover things that either other people haven’t covered hugely, that people wouldn’t read about elsewhere, or cover a story in a slightly different way.”

Many still accuse VICE of being too biased in comparison to the mainstream media. Obviously, objectivity is the goal of any serious publication and VICE is not an exception:

“We try to be unbiased. For example, in the Syria issue, we had an article written from Syria by pro-regime and rebel people. It’s a good example to show that we try to be as representative as possible, showing different sides.”

Founded as a fanzine in Montreal in 1994, VICE now distributes a free monthly magazine in multiple languages in 29 countries. Its ten vertical content channels cover various topics from food to technology.

In 20 years, VICE has become a global success, engaging millions of young people across the world.

Words by Diana Tleuliyeva

View the full Journalism Guest Speaker series

Read a review of ‘BBC News and the Digital Future

Read about BA (Hons) Journalism

 

The post Journalism Guest Speaker Review // The VICE Vision of Journalism appeared first on London College of Communication Blog.

Students from RMIT University, Melbourne visit LCC for graphic design workshop

RMIT 2014

RMIT students combine word and image. Photography © Vladimir Molico

London College of Communication recently hosted a group of students from RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia for a word- and image-based design workshop.

The students collaborated with MA Graphic Design Lead Tutor Vanessa Price to generate material in response to the immediate vicinity of the Elephant and Castle.

We asked Vanessa to tell us more about this workshop and the research project from which it developed:

Through the cityscape of the Elephant and the texts and narratives of its everyday life, the RMIT workshop re-imagined how graphic design could enable us to become more ‘writerly readers’ of our visual culture.

The collaboration and knowledge-sharing with RMIT is ongoing as students continue to develop the project back in Melbourne.

‘Writerly Readers’ is the ongoing research project I lead at LCC. The research has arisen from an archive of the practice-based Writerly Readers workshop undertaken by postgraduate students within the School of Design.

Since 2011, the visual case study for this word and image workshop has been the immediate area around LCC: the Elephant and Castle.

The workshop asks participants to consider how we create and receive visual messages and argues for a model of design through which we can question the provenance of visual texts and the role of graphic design within the wider framework of visual communication.

As graphic design becomes increasingly synonymous with a contemporary visual discourse dominated by commercial advertising culture, a case emerges to develop a more collaborative process that could question the role of graphic design within the visual spectacle.

In considering relationships between authoring and receiving visual messages, the project argues for a model of design that invites the viewer to become more writerly readers of visual meaning.

group at wall

Photography © Vladimir Molico

Read about MA Graphic Design

Read Vanessa Price’s staff profile

Read more about Research at LCC

The post Students from RMIT University, Melbourne visit LCC for graphic design workshop appeared first on London College of Communication Blog.

Research // Grace Adam draws a crowd

big draw setting up

Preparing for The Big Draw. Image © Grace Adam

On Monday 20 October, students, staff and passers-by were treated to an exciting pop-up drawing session in the Typo cafe by LCC lead design tutor Grace Adam as part of Inside Out Festival 2014.

Grace’s event, ‘Framing the Elephant’, invited people to stop, look and draw, taking 10 minutes or half an hour to create a fast, fun drawing of the view from inside the College.

The highlight of #framingtheelephant - a part of #lccgradschool! #nofilter

Instagram @fbigos

A brilliant drawing by @jhartley95 at @lcclondon #framingtheelephant

Instagram @fbigos

Grace has also recently appeared on ‘Daily Brunch with Ocado‘, demonstrating a few fun and unusual ways to get drawing.

Watch the video here [starts 26:59]

Speaking about her wider involvement in ‘The Big Draw’, a national festival of drawing with events held around the country, Grace told presenters Tim Lovejoy and Simon Rimmer:

“The Big Draw was set up to get people re-engaged with drawing, having fun, and connecting to the world in a different way […} I think it’s considered a childish thing to do, and we communicate with text. Drawing is not taken so seriously, which is a shame. It’s essential.

“I think everybody is obsessed by ‘getting it right’ and getting it to look like the real world, but your drawing will be different from my drawing. You express yourself as an individual and that’s important.

“Drawing is a pleasure, drawing is a way to look at the world, to communicate, to experiment, to explore. It’s a good thing and we’re losing it.”

If you’ve missed out this year, however, some of Grace’s own sculptural work is on show until Friday 31 October in ‘Modes of Remembrance’ at St Giles-in-the-Fields, exploring and responding to the idea of monuments and memorials within the church.

Read Grace Adam’s staff profile

Read more about Research at LCC

The post Research // Grace Adam draws a crowd appeared first on London College of Communication Blog.

Research // Grace Adam draws a crowd

big draw setting up

Preparing for The Big Draw. Image © Grace Adam

On Monday 20 October, students, staff and passers-by were treated to an exciting pop-up drawing session in the Typo cafe by LCC lead design tutor Grace Adam as part of Inside Out Festival 2014.

Grace’s event, ‘Framing the Elephant’, invited people to stop, look and draw, taking 10 minutes or half an hour to create a fast, fun drawing of the view from inside the College.

The highlight of #framingtheelephant - a part of #lccgradschool! #nofilter

Instagram @fbigos

A brilliant drawing by @jhartley95 at @lcclondon #framingtheelephant

Instagram @fbigos

Grace has also recently appeared on ‘Daily Brunch with Ocado‘, demonstrating a few fun and unusual ways to get drawing.

Watch the video here [starts 26:59]

Speaking about her wider involvement in ‘The Big Draw’, a national festival of drawing with events held around the country, Grace told presenters Tim Lovejoy and Simon Rimmer:

“The Big Draw was set up to get people re-engaged with drawing, having fun, and connecting to the world in a different way [...] I think it’s considered a childish thing to do, and we communicate with text. Drawing is not taken so seriously, which is a shame. It’s essential.

“I think everybody is obsessed by ‘getting it right’ and getting it to look like the real world, but your drawing will be different from my drawing. You express yourself as an individual and that’s important.

“Drawing is a pleasure, drawing is a way to look at the world, to communicate, to experiment, to explore. It’s a good thing and we’re losing it.”

If you’ve missed out this year, however, some of Grace’s own sculptural work is on show until Friday 31 October in ‘Modes of Remembrance’ at St Giles-in-the-Fields, exploring and responding to the idea of monuments and memorials within the church.

Read Grace Adam’s staff profile

Read more about Research at LCC

The post Research // Grace Adam draws a crowd appeared first on London College of Communication Blog.

LCC BA (Hons) Photography students capture London with ASUS ZenFone

Asus landscape cropped

Detail from image @ailujjjulia, Instagram

Last week 80 first-year BA (Hons) Photography students were given an ASUS ZenFone 5 LTE smartphone and challenged to create stunning photography around the capital.

For the past few days they have been competing to take the best photos using each of the ZenFone’s camera modes (Low Light, Panorama, Selfie and Time Rewind).

In a fifth category, the students were asked to snap an image that epitomises London.

Here are some of the submissions posted on Instagram:

London Red Bus by Trafalgar Square #London #ZenphoneUAL #ASUSZenphone

Instagram @elliottthetallone
Elliott Dean

Street art in Brick Lane. #AsusZenfone #ZenfoneUAL #London #streetart

Instagram @louise.donohue
Louise Donohue

#ThisisLondon, my London. Captured this afternoon near Westminster bridge with my #ASUSZenFone for #zenfoneual!We are having a competition within our first year of BA photography at LCC with @ASUShq and @London! Wish me luck!Love, from #London

Instagram @kim.ou
Kim Leuenberger

Zenfone Competition!! Give me a like plz~#ASUSZenfone #ZenFoneUAL #London #BigBen #LONDONEYE #UAL #HAPPY # LIFE #BUS #UK #SUN #2014 #lomo #Westminster #riverthames #phone

Instagram @yehsunny2002
Yah-ching Yeh

We will share the winning images when they are announced, but in the meantime search #asuszenfone and #zenfoneual on Instagram to see more.

Read about BA (Hons) Photography

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