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Meet: RIXO

Orlagh McCloskey and Henrietta Rix both studied BA Fashion Management at the London College of Fashion. After working on a project together they hit it off and decided to go into business together.  Now, a year later, they have just launched their own Womenswear contemporary label, RIXO, a strong British take on vintage creating wearable flattering shapes for women of all ages.  We met with Henrietta and Orlagh to find out how their journey from the classroom to the boardroom…

Henrietta and Orlagh

Henrietta and Orlagh

What made you want to study at LCF?

Orlagh: There was no one from where I’m from who had ever been to LCF; it was definitely the name and the reputation that drew me to study there.

Henrietta: I found three courses I was interested in – one in Manchester, one in Westminster and one at LCF – I knew I wanted to come to London, and was torn between the campus-feel of Westminster and being in the centre of London with London College of Fashion.  One of my friends had done the course at LCF and recommended it to me, she said the connections that you gain through LCF, being in the centre of London and the reputation makes it stand out.

How did you adjust to life in London?

H: In my first year I found it hard as I didn’t know that many people and I wasn’t used to it, but it does make you stronger as a person definitely.

O: When you’re at a campus Uni you don’t get that taste of what living in London is actually like, you’re in the campus bubble. LCF helps you adjust to getting a job after and the London lifestyle, because you’re already used to it.

It takes a year to find your friends, it took longer than I expected – you meet people in class but it takes a while to forge the relationships after class… 

Part of the first collection

Part of the first collection

What were the highlights of your time at LCF?

All the modules had a commercial side with real life situations, not necessarily all design – we were always grounded in the reality of the industry, and what’s going on 24/7.

When did you decide you wanted to work together?

We did a consultancy project together where we had to go out into industry and find a company to be consultants for. We found Anne’s Podium by going round loads of studios and knocking on doors in East London. She opened it and agreed to take us on. We worked really closely on that and realised how well we worked together.  We had the same sort of attitude and approached work in the same way.

We then both went on the placement years. We decided to do the year in industry to get some contacts and experience, and as soon as we finished we could start the business!

Tell us more about RIXO

We’ve always been obsessed with going to vintage fairs and finding timeless pieces, and we were thinking more and more about how the high street is commercial and saturated – you can go in to Zara and everyone will be wearing the same top as you, and we were getting sick of that.  We saw a gap in the market for the entry level contemporary price point and our concept.  Our customer is someone who would go into Zara, but it willing to spend a bit more for something that is timeless and not trend-driven…

 Short black dress

How do you switch off and relax?

It’s not a 9-5 job, we are constantly thinking about the brand, reading stuff, looking at competitors. We don’t ever switch off.

O: This morning I dreamt that our development samples were getting mixed up and I woke up in a sweat. We constantly have to check with each other whether we’ve had the conversations or just dreamt them!

H: I’ll wake up in the morning and it will be as if I haven’t seen Orlagh in a week, I’ve got so many new ideas and things to talk about.

You have to have the drive and ambition, which we both have. We can’t have doubts. We are realistic and have plan B’s but you HAVE to be positive and believe in it. There’s no way that both of us would give up our income living in London and be putting our own personal finding into it if we didn’t think it was going to work. We have to be REALLY self-motivated. We can’t wait to get up in the morning and start working on things.

Do you do the designs yourself?

We design everything and hand-paint all our prints in our kitchen.  We’ve had help from family and friends with design and Photoshop.  You have to have your finger in every pie and work out what you can do yourselves to get costs down. If you don’t know something there’s so much information available at your fingertips to learn.  For example, we know we can paint a print, but actually getting it on to a dress is a different matter altogether.   We have taught ourselves lots of new techniques.

We also designed the branding/website/logo – we have a clear and strong idea of how we want everything to look. We wanted to do it ourselves as we had the vision in our heads. That helped with the development process as we were able to be really clear on what we wanted. Our e-commerce website is launching now! 

How has your degree at LCF helped you with your ventures?

One of the most impotatnt things we learnt on the course at LCF, and from working in industry is being really aware of your cash flow – a lot of designers struggle with this.  For example, a lot of on-line retailers don’t pay on delivery, they pay 120 days later, so you have to bear that in mind when working out how much you can afford.

The experience we got on the course and the year in industry also gave us the contacts to be able to trust the suppliers we are using now. If you have a supplier who you’ve worked with and you trust it gives you the confidence to deliver what you’ve promised, which is crucial to your reputation.

We’ve also subsequently worked with loads of UAL alumni, and through that met loads of crucial new contacts. So many of the people on our course are working in the industry, it’s been really good to have friends who can put you in touch with people, it’s helped a lot!

Skirt and blouse

What have been the highlights so far of setting up the label?

Seeing our name in the label in the back of a dress is an amazing feeling.  Also, we’ve started to get some really good press coverage – so when we see our dress in Red magazine, or the telegraph and Grazia are featuring us during London fashion week, it’s unbelievable.

H: My dad bought a 100 copies of the telegraph when we were in it! 

What’s next for RIXO? 

We are currently selling at three boutiques in London; Wolf and Badger, Bar and Bass and a pop-up in Soho.

Our plan for the immediate future is to launch the website and get our first collection going and then we are planning on rolling the collections – we always want to be adding new things every couple of weeks. We also want to work on getting more press and get noticed.

Orlagh and Henrietta’s Top Tips for setting up your own brand;  

  1. Meet people face-to-face – this has been one of the most important things we’ve done. When you’re starting out people are much more likely to help you out if you’ve met them in person.
  2. You never know when you’re going to work with someone in the future – so it’s really important to keep up good relationships from all your jobs because it’s such a small industry.
  3. If you can, don’t go it alone – We would find it so hard by ourselves, a partner will help you stay motivated. But is is so important that it’s the right person too; someone who you have the same attitude and aesthetic vision as.
  4. Be really flexible and able to take opportunities as and when they come – don’t be stuck and rigid. If a colour comes back slightly different than we imagined but it still looks good, there’s no point in being difficult about it. In the long run that won’t help anyone.
  5. Be nice to everyone! At the end of the day everyone is just doing their job…






Meet: Valerie Goode

Valerie Goode (Design Pattern Cut Womenswear at London College of Fashion) launched her ethical womenswear brand Kitty Ferreira, after working for a year in mainstream fashion in China, and witnessing the pollution created by the industry…

Valerie Goode

Valerie Goode

What made you decide to study at London College of Fashion?
I am a born and bred Londoner, so London College of Fashion always had a special appeal to me.

What was the best thing LCF taught you? And did it help you prepare for life after?
I think we’re more commercially and technically minded than our Central Saint Martins cousins, so naturally that helped in the world of fashion business. It certainly helped to lay the foundations of my own business, understanding product development and generally knowing that I’d be doing less designing and more business administrative work.

What’s your favourite thing about London? And your favourite thing to do here?
London is a culturally rich city; so cosmopolitan that no other city in the world comes close. I love that I can easily experience different cultures either through foods, dance or simply meeting people; and then there’s the freedom to express yourself creatively through clothing, and nobody bats an eyelid.

My favourite thing to do in London is to experience dance from different cultures, from belly dancing or Kizomba to Salsa.

What inspired you to move towards ethical fashion?
I studied a continual professional development course at LCF in Supply Chain Management and Marketing which focused on sustainability, and was a real eye-opener. At the time I had been working as a designer for high street suppliers so didn’t think much of it in terms of it affecting my career. It wasn’t until I worked as a Senior Designer in China, a few years later, that it kicked in; witnessing the thick air pollution, I returned to the UK knowing that I needed to do things differently.

I started to look at more natural lifestyles, with my Caribbean late grandmother (whom the label is named after) being the first inspiration. I found she was upcycling long before it became a fashionable term.

A selection from Kitty Ferreira's  award-winning collection

A selection from Kitty Ferreira’s award-winning collection

What were the greatest challenges you have faced in sustainable fashion? And what have you learnt from them?
The initial challenge was sourcing and setting up my supply chain, as all the contacts I had made throughout my career over the last 10 years had become obsolete.

Secondly, communicating the ethical and sustainable message without sounding like a tree hugging hippy. Fortunately, I had decided quite early on that my brand would juxtapose city-chic with the natural world. I think Lucy Siegle from The Guardian has succinctly described the aesthetic of my brand the best in her latest article: “Goode makes clothes that are for boardroom activists rather than penniless heroes that climb up cooling towers…”

What does the future have in store for Kitty Ferreira?
The brand has won a couple of awards from the Royal College of Art and from, so we’re working through being mentored by them as well as by the team at the Centre for Sustainable Fashion. The long term vision is to develop the brand into a rival of non sustainable high street stores.

What advice would you give for any students and alumni interested in focussing more on sustainable fashion?
Sustainable fashion shouldn’t be about a fad nor trend, rather I approach it as a way of life and mind-set, practiced in a non-contrived manner by an older generation and in particular by those who have not originated from the Western world. From this stand point you see how developments within a capitalist and consumer rich society have created ‘throw- away’ consumers whilst affecting other nations negatively. It’s a very deep subject matter that involves stripping back many layers to find the crux of the problem. The solution is neither clear cut, yet this is where the excitement lies- many innovations in fabric, product development and in supply chain management can be created here.


Check out Kitty Ferreria’s award winning collection

Find out more about Design Pattern Cut Womenswear at London College of Fashion


Professor Charlotte Hodes, LCF is featured in the forthcoming documentary

   charlotte 2

Mirrors to Windows: The Artist as Woman

To be screened on 8 March 12:00, The Royal Academy

Charlotte Hodes, Professor in Fine Art, LCF, is featured in the forthcoming documentary ‘Mirrors to Windows: The Artist as Woman’ which will be screened on International Women’s Day at the Royal Academy on Sunday 8 March at noon. This is part of a programme of events to celebrate IWD at the RA that explore inter-generational perspectives on women in the arts.

Tickets and a ‘taster’ of the film

For more information:

charlotte 1

Call for chapter proposals: Handbook of Research on Global Fashion Management and Merchandising

propose a chapter

Handbook of Research on Global Fashion Management and Merchandising
A book edited by Alessandra Vecchi, (London College of Fashion, U.K.)
Chitra Buckley, (London College of Fashion, U.K.)
To be published by IGI Global:
For release in the Advances in Logistics, Operations, and Management Science (ALOMS) Book Series
ISSN: 2327-350X

Proposal Submission Deadline: February 28, 2015

Propose a chapter for this book

The Advances in Logistics, Operations, and Management Science (ALOMS) Book Series provides a collection of reference publications on the current trends, applications, theories, and practices in the management science field. Providing relevant and current research, this series and its individual publications would be useful for academics, researchers, scholars, and practitioners interested in improving decision making models and business functions.

Introduction The Research Handbook of Fashion Management provides an edited collection of chapters on grounds theories, application and practices the field of management in the fashion sector. Providing relevant and current research, this publication would be useful for academic, researchers, scholars, and practitioners interested in improving their understanding of management within the context of Globalization in a highly volatile and creative environment.

Fashion management is multi-faceted discipline that within the context of Globalization finds itself at the intersection of the following related fields:

Fashion Entrepreneurship, Operations Management, Fashion Marketing and International Business.

Normally these fields constitute sparse bodies of knowledge within Fashion Management, however because of the heightened complexity of the current business environment they are becoming more and more complementary. As such an in-depth understanding of their interplay is not only necessary but it could also provide a useful interpretative lens to fully appreciate the value of Fashion management and its business practices in an era of Globalization.

As global fashion markets are becoming increasingly complex and their dynamics more and more interconnected, a broader understanding of fashion management is essential to anticipate unexpected change and to capitalize on emerging fashion business practices. This research handbook will focus on various dimensions of managing fashion businesses that are interrelated and complementary in a global context.

Objective of the Book

This research handbook looks to discuss Fashion Management research in the following related fields:

Fashion entrepreneurship, Operations Management, Fashion marketing and International business.

The handbook covers various sub-themes including visionary leadership, fashion technology, business model development, sourcing and supply chain management, operations management in fast fashion and slow fashion businesses, product innovation management, fashion brand management, digital strategies in the fashion industry, experiential marketing and branding in fashion and the internationalization of fashion firms.

Target Audience

The target audience of the research handbook will be a vast array of fashion management practitioners, academics and researchers who have a keen interest in the ever-changing dynamics of the fashion industry. The book would also be suitable to be used as a teaching aid in a variety of courses in different disciplines both at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

Recommended topics include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Fashion management in a global perspective
  • The European fashion industry and the appeal of its heritage
  • Fashion entrepreneurship
  • Visionary leadership
  • Financial management
  • Fashion-technology
  • Business model development
  • Business incubation in the fashion industry
  • Operations management in the fashion industry
  • Fast fashion and Slow fashion
  • Sourcing and supply chain management in fashion
  • Product innovation management
  • Managing HR in fashion firms
  • The importance of CRM
  • Fashion buying and merchandising
  • Fashion marketing
  • Digital strategies in the fashion industry
  • The importance of CSR
  • Fashion brand management
  • Experiential marketing and branding in the fashion industry
  • The internationalization of fashion firms
  • Cross-cultural marketing
  • The emerging markets
  • Counterfeiting, IPR and legal issues
  • The global fashion industry and its emerging dynamics

Submission Procedure

Both researchers and practitioners are invited to submit a chapter proposal of 1,000-2,000 words clearly explaining the mission and concerns of their proposed chapter by February 28th, 2015. Submissions should be made through the weblink at the bottom of this page.  Authors of accepted proposals will be notified by April 30, 20155 about the status of their proposals and sent chapter outlines. Full chapters are expected to be submitted by June 30, 2015. All submitted chapters will be reviewed on a double-blind review basis. Contributors may also be requested to serve as reviewers for the research handbook.

Full chapters may be submitted to this book here: Submit a chapter
All proposals should be submitted through the link at the bottom of this page.


This book is scheduled to be published by IGI Global (formerly Idea Group Inc.), an international academic publisher of the “Information Science Reference” (formerly Idea Group Reference), “Medical Information Science Reference,” “Business Science Reference,” and “Engineering Science Reference” imprints. IGI Global specializes in publishing reference books, scholarly journals, and electronic databases featuring academic research on a variety of innovative topic areas including, but not limited to, education, social science, medicine and healthcare, business and management, information science and technology, engineering, public administration, library and information science, media and communication studies, and environmental science. For additional information regarding the publisher, please visit This publication is anticipated to be released in 2016.

Important Dates

  • February 28, 2015: Proposal Submission Deadline
  • April 30, 2015: Notification of accepted proposals
  • June 30, 2015: Full Chapter Submission
  • August 30, 2015: Review Results to Authors
  • September 30, 2015: Revised Chapter Submission
  • October 15, 2015: Final Acceptance Notifications

Inquiries can be forwarded to Chitra Buckley Graduate School, London College of Fashion
Tel: +44 (0)207 514 7578 Email:,

Dr. Alessandra Vecchi Graduate School, London College of Fashion, U.K.

Propose a chapter for this book

To find related content in this research area, visit InfoSci®-OnDemand: Download Premium Research Papers:

Industry Partner Awards: Inspirational Speaker – Emma Watkinson


It is our pleasure to announce that Emma Watkinson is highly commended in the Inspirational Speaker category as part of LCF Careers Industry Partner Awards, which celebrates all the amazing work businesses and industry people have done with LCF students.

Emma, CEO and Co-Founder of, a new online destination for emerging designers and independent brands, was nominated as one of the most Inspirational Speakers because of her constant involvement and willingness to share her experiences with students. Emma has shared her incredible personal stories of success, hard work and the reality of having your own business – giving powerful messages and tips to students who want to follow in her footsteps.

Understandably, we at LCF News wanted to find out what it was like to be Emma, so we asked her to walk us through a regular day on the job at SilkFred. Here’s what she had to say…

I wake up… at 7 and make some coffee. I’ll retreat back to bed to go through the sales from the previous day and check over my “to do” list. I use the Wunderlist app to track my tasks and I only pay attention to my “immediate priorities”.

When I get into the office… I catch up with my team – our Designer Liaison, Charlotte (who looks after our designers), Head of Marketing Rob, and Aimee from Customer Service. We’ll talk about promotions, stock and anything sales related. I’ll then catch up with our CTO, Josh and we’ll talk about progress on new features we’re building and any issues that might have cropped up.



My mornings… are always different and it really depends on what we’ve identified as a priority for the business. It could be overhauling our email marketing strategy, releasing a new version of the website, talking about how to improve our experience for customers or going to investor meetings.

What’s important though, is I try to be quite disciplined with how I start the day. I’ll tackle the most important things first and try not to touch my emails until later in the afternoon or even the early evening. It’s really easy to get caught up in “day to day” tasks and not spend enough time working on strategy or next steps for the business.

Lunch… is normally around 1.30pm though it’s not unusual to have arrived at 4.30pm and have completely forgotten! I usually grab something from Itsu or Pret though if I have a lunch meeting or I’m able to get out of the office for an hour, I’ll head over to Ozone on Leonard Street.

My afternoons… usually involve a bit of over-spill from the morning, especially if I’ve had to take a few calls. I try to arrange any meetings late afternoon so they don’t disrupt the day too much but if I’m in the office, I’ll work with one or both of my co- founders. I love working out how to keep driving growth or, even though it can be stressful, thinking about how to handle difficult challenges.


I’ll go through plans for new designers joining SilkFred with Charlotte and also highlight some potential designers we’d love to bring on-board.

I’ll also go through our social media accounts. Our main sales channels are via social media. We’ve grown our Facebook fans from 3,000 in Jan to 115,000 in just seven months. Currently we’re applying the same attack with Instagram, Twitter and Google ads so it’s important to stay on top of our efforts across the different channels.

Charlotte and I will also have a Diet Coke/ coffee break to get us through to the end of the day!


I leave the office… at 7pm but there have been times where I’ve stayed until the early hours of the morning. I once slept in the boardroom!

It’s hard to pin down a time I actually stop working, as I’ll work on emails on the bus home (I’ll jump in a cab if it’s late!) and then well into the evening. I’ll spend some time on the phone to my co-founder Stephen, going through the day’s sales and plans for the rest of the week.

In the evening… I’d like to say I make it to the gym, but that’s wishful thinking! If I’m staying in I’ll put on some music, bash through my emails and read for an hour. I just finished reading Last Exit to Brooklyn (brilliant but miserable) and I’ll sometimes read business style books like, Peter Thiel’s Zero to One.

I like to catch up with friends over dinner and wine – I grew up in Spain where I met my best friends and I’m lucky enough to have them here in London. We work in totally different industries (fashion, art, hospitality, marketing) so it’s great to hear what they are up to. We’ll share the thrills and spills of being a twenty something in London. It’s really important to surround yourself with good people and they can help you put things in perspective when things feel a little difficult.

I’m not particularly great in the kitchen so if I’m at home, I’ll just pick something up on the way home (there’s a great Italian café/ deli near my house that has an amazing salad and hot food counter) or if I’m feeling naughty I love getting a burger from Five Guys!


If I’m having dinner with my friends, we’ll go to Mr Buckley’s or head over to Broadway Market. We also really like Ceviche in Soho. Anything with lots of tapas style sharing plates with a few healthy options.

My favourite part of what I do… is working with the designers, promoting their brands, working out the best ways to sell lots of products for them, hearing about their plans for the future, helping them out with other challenges in their business. I think being independent is a really powerful thing and this is why I support the designers who’ve made the choice to go it alone.

My advice to those who want to follow in my footsteps… Go work for someone else! Try working at a big company, small company or a start-up. Learn as much as possible and always be hungry for opportunities. Nothing can fully prepare you the first time you set up a business, but arm yourself with as much experience as possible. When I finished university I had a very different idea of what role I wanted to eventually take on, it was only through trying different things and working out what was right (and wrong!) for me!


Businesses should offer work experience to students because… we all have to start somewhere. Companies also have a lot to gain from working with students, especially if the student has been learning about something that allows them to contribute in a meaningful way.

The students I’ve taken on from LCF on placement were… brilliant! They came with a willingness to take on any task given to them and to learn as much as possible.

We would like to say a huge congratulations to Emma for her amazing work, and we look forward to working with her again in the future.

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