Archive for the ‘Research’ category

PhD researcher, Idit Nathan talks about her current show at Standpoint Gallery

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The exhibition FOOTNOTES PLAYING DEAD is Idit Elia Nathan’s (PhD candidate at CSM) first solo show. It opened at Standpoint Gallery in London on the 15th January and will run till 14th Feb 2015.

Footnotes Playing Dead is the culmination of 5 years of practice-based research titled Art of Play in Zones of Conflict, which explores the intersections between the seemingly unrelated phenomenons of play and conflict.

The exhibition title takes its cue from the opening lines of Günter Grass’ famously controversial poem What Must Be Said, which considers personal and collective responsibilities in times of adversity and interminable conflict. The title also reflects on children’s games and certain theatrical demonstrations in the West Bank and Gaza as well as more recently here in London, where people pretend to be dead in order to highlight the way in which children and innocent civilians are targeted by one of the most powerful armies in the world.

Tell us about the work you are showing in Footnotes Playing Dead and why did you choose this work?

The artworks are all playful and interactive because I wanted to create participatory experiences in which the viewers are invited to “play with” and explore for themselves the complexities of conflicts, which as stated by Artist Simon Leung

‘…even if we do not live under the direct threat of war’s violence, we understand ourselves in relationship to the state-sanctioned killing of others, elsewhere, in our time, and at times in our name’.

I included three projects which are central to my research and which I wanted to concentrate in one space. For example Seven Walks in a Holy City which explores Jerusalem, the city I grew up and left more than twenty years ago is explored through walks of varying length, thematic foci and staring points, all determined by cards and dice. Following the walks I produced seven series of postcards, which are on display and available for purchase. Another project called Hegemonopoly/Machsompoly is an adaptation of the classic monopoly game to reflect on the landscape of Israel Palestine with its wealth of settlements as well as checkpoints and where freedom of movement and restrictions on it are not equal to all, as those playing in the gallery soon find out. In Painting the City Golden or a Leaf from Tansy’s Book the gallery visitors are invited to ‘colour in’ their own version of one of the city’s most iconic tourist sites.

There are other games such as a triptych of HAND MADE MEMORY GAMES where all the cards are made out of black and white photos from different parts of the world as well as from a variety of historical times with subject matters ranging from Aerial Bombs in the first to Checkpoints and Refugees inthe second and third, making it tricky to win. And there is my first inkjet print Invisible Cities Series, No. 1 and my first artists book Please watch ur head, published with marmalade publishers of visual culture so its a very varied show.

It has been particularly interesting to get all the artworks of recent years into one space and it was great to site the work at Standpoint gallery, with its intimate and evocative features such as the lift with its heavy metal mesh doors. The opening event included a raffle of postcard paintings which will be sent out to the winners once the show comes down. So far I have had some excellent feedback and with two discussion events planned it promises to be a busy and interesting month for me.

Why did you choose CSM for your PhD studies, and how did you find the experience? (how has studying for a PhD developed your work)

When I started considering the possibility of embarking on a research project to contextuaise work that was loosely tied together a friend pointed me in the direction of my now supervisors Pam Skelton and Professor Anne Tallantire. I knew and admired their work and was delsighted when they offered me a place. They were then joined by Caterina Albano and I now have an amazing team of supervisors, each contributing from their own perspective so its proved to be a very rich experience so far. There is no doubt that the research has impacted positively on the work I have made in ways that I am still in the process of reflecting on and I hope will be articulated in the thesis itself. It seems to have made me more reflective and I’d like to think a better writer too. In terms of the work produced I think it has benefited from the contextual research and hopefully become richer and more rigorous.

How do you juggle being a PhD student and practitioner?

It is a challenge and I have given up on trying to find the perfect balance – it just doesn’t exist. Some weeks/months are dedicated to making work and others to writing and the word juggling is the right one in this context. I make work, sometimes relating to the thesis, at others less so, and then it feels like I will never manage to write about it or get back to the thesis and then it can be quite the opposite – making the work – means that some of the thoughts fall much more easily onto the page and find their way into the thesis. As fluxus’ score says ‘you never quite know.’

For further information:

 

The Department of Repair

Exhibition

Department of Repair: image by Bridget Harvey.

Bridget Harvey has co-curated a project at the Camberwell Space called The Department of Repair as part of her PhD research.  It is a two part project involving three weeks of workshops and exhibition, followed by three weeks of exhibition which will include the outcomes of the workshops.

The Department of Repair explores (re)making through fixing, repairing and mending. The project reframes the theme of ‘repair’, exploring its identities and its potential as an environmentally/socially engaged practice. The project aims to create space for broader interpretations of repairing, fixing and/or mending practice, exploring categories such as repair narratives, agents, materials, and methods/systems.

The project begins with an exhibition which showcases approaches to mending, guides and tools of repair. For the first three weeks, visiting (re)makers, (re)designers and repairers, who demonstrate and teach repair and re-making skills will run drop-in workshops. Outcomes from the workshops will be then added to the existing set of exhibits to form a larger exhibition.  A two-part publication will complement the project with writings by and about the repairers and exhibits involved in the project.

  • All workshops will take place at Camberwell Space as part of the exhibition.
  • All workshops are free and open to the public.

For further information:

The project reception will be held on  3rd February, starting with a talk by Daniel Charny at 4pm, followed by drinks in the space until 8pm.  Please RSVP to camberwellspace@camberwell.arts.ac.uk

Yve Lomax talk: Photographs, Writing.

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A research talk by Yve Lomax:

‘Photographs, Writing’

Wednesday 11 March 2015, 4.30.
Street Lecture Theatre, London College of Communication, Elephant & Castle.

All welcome.

The Photography and the Contemporary Imaginary Research Hub at LCC is pleased to announce a research talk by Yve Lomax:

‘Within this talk I will give examples of my writing and, in so doing, say something about photographic images. There will be examples that embrace what I can only call the ‘art’ of writing. There will also be examples of me toing and froing as, in writing, I enter into conversation with myself. And finally there will be ideas regarding the example itself and how, if only for a moment, a photographic image can be considered as that.’

Yve Lomax is a visual artist and writer. She is author of Pure Means: Writing, Photographs and an Insurrection of Being(2013), Passionate Being: Language, Singularity and Perseverance (2010), Sounding the Event: Escapades in Dialogue and Matters of Art, Nature and Time (2005) and Writing the Image: An Adventure with Art and Theory (2000). She is currently Senior Research Tutor for Photography and Fine Art at the Royal College of Art. She is also a director of and commissioning editor for the Common Intellectual series of Copy Press.

This event is organized in association with TrAIN, the UAL research centre for transnational art, identity and nation.

Please direct enquiries to: Weibke Leister, w.leister@lcc.arts.ac.uk

LCC announces major photography, sound and moving image exhibition ‘Staging Disorder’

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Opening on Monday 26 January and curated by Christopher Stewart and Esther Teichmann, ‘Staging Disorder’ explores the contemporary representation of the real in relation to modern conflict.

The project is initiated and supported by Karin Askham, Dean of the School of Media.

The exhibition includes selected images from seven photographic series that were made independently of each other near the start of the new millennium:

Adam Broomberg and Oliver Chanarin’s ‘Chicago’, Geissler/Sann’s ‘personal kill’, Claudio Hils’ ‘Red Land Blue Land’, An-My Lê’s ’29 Palms’, Richard Mosse’s ‘Airside’, Sarah Pickering’s ‘Public Order’ and Christopher Stewart’s ‘Kill House’.

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’747 Heathrow’, Richard Mosse

These artists portray fake domestic rooms, aircraft, houses, streets and entire towns designed as military and civilian mock-ups in preparation for real or imagined future conflicts across the globe. Their work asks questions about the nature of truth in current photographic practice.

The images in all seven series are documentary images of something which appears real but has in fact been staged to mimic a disordered reality.

In capturing this constructed reality, the works explore modern, premeditated conflict, and analyse a unique form of architecture.

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‘High Street’, Sarah Pickering

The ‘Staging Disorder’ concept refers not to how the photographers have staged disordered reality themselves, but rather to how they have recognised and responded to a phenomenon of staging that already exists.

These themes are also extended throughout the LCC gallery spaces in work by sound artists from UAL’s Creative Research into Sound Arts Practice (CRiSAP) research centre.

CRiSAP artists Cathy Lane, Angus Carlyle (and his collaborator, the anthropologist Rupert Cox), David Toop and Peter Cusack add a multi-dimensional element to the photographic works with sound and moving image installations and written texts.

The show coincides with a symposium on the afternoon of Tuesday 27 January and a book launch at 6pm of the publication ‘Staging Disorder’ by Black Dog Publishing, co-edited by Christopher Stewart and Esther Teichmann.

Staging Disorder
Private View: Tuesday 27 January 6-9pm
Exhibition open: Monday 26 January – Thursday 12 March
Opening times: Monday-Friday 10am – 5pm, Saturday 11am – 4pm, Sunday closed
RSVP for Private View
Venue: London College of Communication, Elephant & Castle, London SE1 6SB.

#stagingdisorder

Read about BA (Hons) Photography

Read about BA (Hons) Photojournalism and Documentary Photography

Read about BA (Hons) Sound Arts and Design

Read about MA Photography

Read about MA Photojournalism and Documentary Photography

Read about MA Sound Arts

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UAL ranks in overall top 30 in UK’s latest higher education research audit

University of the Arts London ranks among the top research universities with 83% of its research graded as world leading and internationally excellent, following the Research Excellence Framework 2014 (REF 2014).

UAL is placed by REF 2014 in the overall top 30 UK research institutions for the quality of research submitted. It is a top 5 research university in its broader peer group and first in the Power ranking in the Art and Design: History, Practice and Theory category.

Analysis by Times Higher Education shows that UAL enjoys 15.22% market share of all art and design research in the UK, by far the largest share of any institution.

Nigel Carrington, Vice-Chancellor of UAL, said:

“UAL is known as a centre of excellence in practice-based teaching. I am delighted that we are now also recognised as a leading research university. We are making important contributions to global research on creative practice, sustainability, fashion, curation and the history of art and design.”

UAL has the largest community of designer and artist researchers in the world, and is a dynamic location for contemporary art historical research.

This is the most influential UK-wide benchmark for research. The results will be used by the four UK higher education funding bodies to allocate research funding to universities – around £2 billion per year from 2015-16.

Notes
1. REF 2014 provides a robust and thorough assessment of the quality of universities’ research in all disciplines. The research of 52,061 academic staff from 154 UK universities was peer-reviewed by a series of panels comprising UK and international experts, and external users of research.
2. REF 2014 was undertaken by the four higher education funding bodies for England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. It replaces the Research Assessment Exercise (RAE), last conducted in 2008. The results are available at www.ref.ac.uk
3. REF 2014 was a process of expert review. HEIs were invited to make submissions in 36 units of assessment. Submissions were assessed by an expert sub-panel for each unit of assessment, working under the guidance of four main panels. Sub-panels applied a set of generic assessment criteria and level definitions, to produce an overall quality profile for each submission.
4. The overall quality profile awarded to each submission is derived from three elements:
a. The quality of research outputs. This contributes 65 per cent of the overall quality profile. The panels reviewed 191,150 submitted research outputs.
b. The social, economic and cultural impact of research. This contributes 20 per cent of the overall quality profile. This is a new feature in the assessment framework. The panels reviewed 6,975 submitted impact case studies.
c. The research environment. This contributes 15 per cent of the overall quality profile.
5. UAL places 26th out of all UK higher education institutions who submitted to REF 2014 in all subjects.
6. 83% of UAL’s research was assessed as world-leading (31%) and internationally excellent (52%).
7. Of all UK higher education institutions in unit of assessment 34 (Art & Design: History, Practice and Theory), UAL is 1st in the Power ranking.
8. UAL is 5th of all higher education institutions from peer group D who submitted research in unit of assessment 34: Art & Design.
9. UAL’s research case studies can be found at http://www.arts.ac.uk/research/research-impact/

 

 

Nigel Carrington praises UAL’s research community following REF 2014

After years of hard work, we now know that UAL has achieved an outstanding result in the Research Excellence Framework 2014. You can read our public statement on the UAL news pages.

83% of the research we submitted was graded as world-leading and internationally excellent. This places UAL in the overall top 30 UK research institutions in the UK for the quality of research submitted.

To put this in context, REF 2014 is the most influential and far-reaching UK-wide benchmark for research. The results will be used by the four UK higher education funding bodies to allocate research funding to universities – around £2 billion per year from 2015-16. So this result should have a big influence on our fortunes over the next six years.

As I have said more publicly, UAL is known as a centre of excellence in practice-based teaching. I am delighted that we are now also recognised as a leading research university against international benchmarks.

I want to pay tribute and thanks to the leadership of Professor Oriana Baddeley, UAL’s Dean of Research, and to the huge efforts of the entire research community at UAL. We are making important contributions to global research. It is right that this is recognised.

Nigel Carrington
Vice-Chancellor, UAL

Awarded UAL MPhil Maria Christoforatou exhibits in London

Maria Christoforatou graduated earlier this year from CCW with an MPhil, we caught up with her to talk about her experience at UAL and what she has been doing since.

Why did you choose to study your MPhil at CCW? Was it a good experience?

I chose to study at CCW because I was confident in the high academic standards and knowledgeable and experienced tutors. It was challenging and enriching experience throughout.

What was the transition from MPhil researcher to independent practitioner like?

Since finishing my MPhil course, less than a year ago, I had 3 solo exhibitions and several group shows. I feel well equipped to explore and present my ideas and my work. I am ready to dedicate myself to further developing and expand my artistic vision.

How has the MPhil influenced your work and career?

It gave me a deeper understanding of both the theoretical and practical aspects of art. Also the extensive study and research opened doors to better appropriating the various aspects of my practice.  Most of all it gave me confidence in expressing my ideas and putting them into work.

Tell us about the work you are including in this solo exhibition; is it different from your MPhil work?

I am expanding the research that I have undertaken and developing new vision and possibilities for my art work.

Maria Christoforatou: Constructing Spaces

28 November – 30 November 2014
The Chocolate Studios, Flat 21, Shepherdess Place 7, London N1 7LJ
RSVP/contact: kornelia.pawlukowska@gmail.com

The exhibition Constructing Spaces presents new works by London based artist Maria Christoforatou. Christoforatou works across a variety of medium including drawings on paper, installations, sculpture, oil paintings and most recently collage.

Her practice examines the emotional effects of displacement in relation to notions of home as a place of refuge and departure, as well as the ways in which art can expose the effects of forced displacement, making observable such feelings as fear,
pain and loss. It is clear that her own personal experiences from the past, which has seen her lose two homes in fire has had a huge impact on her artistic practice.

Maria Christoforatou Constructing Spaces

Through her research Christoforatou examines critically the relationship between the romanticised notion of home, as a place of safety, security, comfort and belonging, and the emotional and material impact of its loss.

To express this concept, the artist deconstructs architectural and physical elements of a house, that are normally seen but overlooked, such as pipes or scaffoldings, to recreate a variety of pieces. By doing this Christoforatou emphasises that the
concept of a home can be very unstable, precarious and vulnerable reflecting the many changes and insecurities that humans have to face today.

The limited use of colour, the absence of people, the use of subtle lines, juxtaposed with the reproductions of Tudor and Victorian houses, as well as gable houses, are what characterise and distinguish Christoforatou’s work.

About Maria

Maria Christoforatou received her BA (Hons.) in Fine Art from the Athens School of Fine Arts (ASFA) in Greece and her MA in Fine Art from Wimbledon College of Arts, University of the Arts London. Recently she graduated from CCW Chelsea College of Arts, University of the Arts London with an MPhil in Fine Art Practice-based research. As part of her research she has been investigating narratives of home and displacement in contemporary art practice.

She recently had a solo exhibition called ‘Dislocated’ at The Gallery @Idea Store Whitechapel, London, UK (2014) and another called, ‘Un-build’, at the Galeria-Atelier Metamorfose, Porto, Portugal (2013). During her career she has taken part in shows in Greece, UK, Italy, Canada, Germany, The Netherlands and USA, and awarded academic scholarships for her work in Greece (Academy of Athens, IKY). She has also been involved in organizing numbers of workshops in London for Tate Galleries, Barbican, Parasol Unit and The National Gallery as well as in Greece and Italy.

Further information about the artist:

Call for Papers: Writing Histories of the Moving Image

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Call for Papers

‘Writing Histories of the Moving Image’
A Doctoral symposium to be held on Thursday 26 March 2015 at Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design (University of the Arts London) Kings Cross

Deadline for submission of proposals: 19 January 2015

This call for papers invites submissions for the symposium Writing Histories of the Moving Image.

Moving image studies have been readdressing histories of artists’ film and video, expanded cinema, independent, community and activist film/video since the early 2000s. Recent research has often focussed on practices that go beyond earlier accounts that segregated histories of cinema, art and other forms of reception, distribution and engagement.

Moving image studies thus examine a wide range of histories, including those of exhibition contexts (Balsom, 2013; Uroskie, 2014), alternative approaches to television (Connolly, 2014), or documentary art practice (Demos, 2013). Moving image studies also frequently locates overlooked practices excluded from existing narratives, and in doing so casts a new light on the processes of inclusion and exclusion at work within historical accounts.

The discourse of moving image research reveals that its histories are open, and can be understood from a number of differing theoretical and critical perspectives. Scholars from different fields of academia such as Art History, Anthropology, Philosophy, Gender, Media and Film Studies, have contributed diverse theoretical approaches that have helped to broaden, deepen and contest histories of the moving image.

Writing about artists’ and experimental moving image is therefore built on a fragmentary patchwork of discourses, theoretical concerns and methodologies. While the approaches are diverse, these new histories have often set out to re-read canons, create new narratives, and disrupt boundaries between media and forms of film and video making. In light of these developments, this symposium aims to examine how and why academics today are writing historical narratives about moving image practices.

We invite submissions from speakers that explore new approaches to the histories of the moving image. The day-long symposium will consist of two panels and each speaker will present for 20 minutes. There will also be screening sessions, events relating to The British Artists’ Film and Video Study Collection (part of the Central Saint Martins Museum) and a screening event co-organised with students undertaking the MRES Moving Image at CSM.

The symposium is organised by Claire Holdsworth and Colin Perry, who are currently undertaking PhDs at CSM. It is being organised with support from CSM Research. As well as encouraging submissions relating to PhD and post-doctoral research, we also welcome proposals from academics and curators with insights and interests relating to writing histories of the moving image.

  • Please send a 300-word abstract proposal, and 3-5 keywords, along with your full name, institutional affiliation and a short biography (ca. 50 words).
  • Proposals should be submitted by email with the subject heading “Proposal: Writing Histories” to:
  • Claire Holdsworth (c.holdsworth1@arts.ac.uk) by 19 January 2015

We look forward to receiving your submissions.

Further reading:

Call for Papers: Fast Forward: Women in Photography – Then and Now

Image ©Anna Fox from the series Back to the Village

Image ©Anna Fox from the series Back to the Village

Following a lively panel discussion about the role of Women Photographers, both historical and current, held at the TATE Modern in April 2014, we are now inviting papers and visual presentations for a conference to be held at the Tate Modern, London in the autumn of 2015.

The original panel brought together women from across the globe to explore and identify key themes and issues pertinent to women’s work in photography in the 21st century. The energetic debates and presentations were inspirational. Through these discussions key issues were identified, informing the development of work for women in photography, highlighting the need to ensure a place for women in the burgeoning histories of the medium.

The TATE Modern, The University for the Creative Arts, and UAL Photography and the Archive Research Centre (PARC) (at London College of Communication, UAL) are now organising a two-day conference, Fast Forward: Women in Photography – Then and Now, to be held at the TATE Modern on 6th & 7th November 2015.

This call for papers and artist’s presentations is looking for for submissions that explore the significance of women’s photographic practices both historical and contemporary, addressing key themes pertinent to current photography research and to celebrate the best work produced by women in photography.

Themes might include: new technologies, re-interpretation of archives and histories, vernacular and amateur photography, social and political impact of photography today, identity and sexuality, activist photography , collaborative practices, staging the real, culture of confession, histories of working concerning production and dissemination ie: collectives/co-ops, web dialogues, networking and social media. In the critical discourses emerging from practice and theory, related to these themes, it is vital today to consider the historical and contemporary place that the work of women in photography occupies.

Submission of papers as follows:

  • 19th January 2015 submit 500 word abstracts for anonymous peer-review
  • 16th March 2015 Successful applicants will be notified after this date.
  • 30th September 2015 Full Paper/presentation required.

Please email submissions to: FASTFORWARD@ucreatve.ac.uk
For any enquiries please email: FASTFORWARD@ucreatve.ac.uk

Two Halves // Dolly Sen and Peter Matthews

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Two Halves is a monthly thoughticle spotlighting two people connected by London College of Communication.

Our aim is to showcase the conceptual intentions, deeper thinking and personal insights that come with the creative process.

If you would like to nominate someone for Two Halves, please email Natalie Reiss (n.reiss@lcc.arts.ac.uk).

DOLLY SEN

“reality is a cheeky bastard”

• My name is Dolly Sen and I am a professional mad person. I spend my time creating art, mischief, things that don’t exist, and working in mental health as a trainer, speaker and consultant.

• I was a student at the London College of Communication (LCC) between 2007-2010, studying film and video, and last year I was commissioned to make a film – Outside – by Sal Anderson, who set up the Institute of Inner Vision, LCC.

• Outside is my experience of psychosis and was shown at the Barbican in 2013.

• Psychosis is akin to collage, a cutting out of reality to present a story/experience that can’t be faced in its purest form. I don’t know of any way to explore psychosis except through art.

• What prompts all my work is the interplay between concepts of ‘madness’ and ‘reality’, so it continues along that line.

• The source material is not a newspaper or magazine, but the complex human being. Without complexity, there would be no art.

• I don’t start with the medium. I start with the idea and then decide which medium is the best way to convey it.

• I do cross-pollinate a lot. If you go to one of my artistic blogs, you can see in the last year I have used visual and conceptual art, poetry, websites, participatory action, performance, subversion of everyday objects, film, writing, and comedy to explore my ideas.

• There are many films professing to show the experience of psychosis. Although there are a few exceptions, mostly it has been done very badly, made by people who have never experienced it and are informed by previous inaccurate cinematic portrayals of psychosis. Think about it this way: you may know the language, the food, the culture and the history of, say, France, but unless you live there, how can write about what it is to be French? There aren’t nearly enough films made on psychosis by people who know it first hand.

• I am not always so serious. In fact most of my art has a playful, irreverent element to it. I don’t know if you will be able to print this, but I think reality is a cheeky bastard, and I am putting him over my lap and slapping his naughty arse through my art.

Dolly Sen is currently training to be an occupational therapist and her film, Outside, has just featured in Mind Rights Film Festival.

http://www.dollysentraining.com/

PETER MATTHEWS

“There’s very little reason to produce art if you don’t keep faith with reality”

• I’m a Senior Lecturer on BA (Hons) Film and Television at LCC. I recently started working on a short film with Sal Anderson (Reader in Interdisciplinary Art-Science Film), David Knight and Jaime Peschiera, who all teach on the course. The film is about bipolar disorder and I believe it marks the first time so many course team members have collaborated on research. It looks like I will be contributing as script advisor and facilitator. The film will be produced under the aegis of the Institute of Inner Vision.

• The first piece (of art) I recall doing that satisfied me creatively was a profile of the old Hollywood star Bette Davis for a long defunct journal called The Modern Review. I think the year was 1992.

• I’ve just written an article on Rainer Werner Fassbinder’s 1972 film The Bitter Tears of Petra von Kant for The Criterion Collection, a New York-based distribution company, and I’m currently tinkering with the final draft.

• I have two degrees in English literature, and I always bring that knowledge to bear on teaching as well as my own writing practice. I encourage students to read widely beyond academic film texts, to attend exhibitions and generally enter into dialogue with other art forms.

• We live in an age of specialisation, and however quaint it sounds to policymakers, there’s still much to be said for the value of a traditional liberal arts education. I’m certainly one for tearing down the artificial barriers between disciplines. Film that looks only to itself is apt to grow sterile and solipsistic.

• My creative practice of writing essays and reviews necessitates spending a great deal of time alone. I will admit that I enjoy the feeling of single authorship. Yet inhabiting the ‘zone’ of writing can be scary. When the words aren’t flowing, I grow intensely aware of my isolation and it’s easy to lose perspective.

• Every artist learns both from tradition and contemporary work, but it can be paralysing if such influences become too dominant. Filmmakers who merely copy the effects of a Scorsese or even a Michael Haneke (to name two examples popular among the students) are apt to end up with a soulless exercise in technique. I think these sources of inspiration should be absorbed and then essentially forgotten about.

• There’s very little reason to produce art if you don’t keep faith with reality (I’m paraphrasing André Bazin here). It would be naïve to suppose we could ever capture it raw. The mediations of the artist may result in something quite phantasmagorical, but that in no way precludes reality – by which I mean a core of emotional truth.

• I believe that film criticism is a branch of writing, and when undertaken seriously, may approach the condition of art.

• I am most proud of an essay I wrote fifteen years ago for Sight & Sound on the French film theorist André Bazin. The runner-up would be a feature on Hitchcock’s Vertigo for the same magazine in 2012. Usually I’m frustrated by the enormous gap between intention and achievement, but I remain proud of these articles because in both cases I found the right words (more or less).

Peter Matthews’s short film will be complete by the end of 2015.

Read more about the Institute of Inner Vision

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