Archive for the ‘Research’ category

Meet Bridget Harvey, UAL PhD student and exhibitor in Textile Toolbox

Bridget Harvey

Bridget Harvey is a PhD student at CCW and member of Textiles Environment Design (TED)  and Textile Futures Research Centre (TFRC). She is a practitioner outside of her PhD, here she tells us about her participation in the TEXTILE TOOLBOX online exhibition, an online exhibtion launching on the 13 November 2014. It is a showcase of ten propositional design concepts inspired by Mistra research into the sustainability of the fashion and textile industry. 

- Tell us about the work you are including in Textile Toolbox: A Jumper to Lend, A Jumper to Mend, by Bridget Harvey – why did you chose this work?

I was invited to make a piece responding to the idea of a clothing library – a place where people can borrow clothes, as one would borrow books.  I thought about this in terms of practicality and aesthetics to start with.  Repair is a form of customisation so alongside the repaired jumper I felt there should be a kit containing the materials needed to mend your own clothes in keeping with your own style.  Along with this I developed a conceptual tool kit, which ‘mends’ the material of the jumper.  Wool is highly processed before we use it and I am interested in the process needed to repair it to its original material form.  These tool kits offer different things – one is an aid to DIY and wardrobe maintenance, and the other is information about material origins.  The jumper posits repair as an aesthetic choice, and embeds the action of repair as a slogan or logo within itself.

- Where do you do most of your work/research?

Where I work depends on my day.  I have access to hot-desking spaces at both Chelsea and Camberwell (where my supervisors are based) but if I am not in college I work from my studio in east London.  I use all the university libraries as they have different collections but for working in I find the quiet room at LCF best.  My studio is my favourite workspace though as I have 2 desks there, one ‘clean’, for writing and reading, and one ‘messy’, for making.  I find that going between writing and making as I need to is my most fluid and productive way of working.

- What is it like to be part of TED and TFRC? How does it affect your work?

Being part of TED and TFRC is brilliant – I have a built in network for support and information, as well as a base to work from.  Their profile means that they are involved in projects I would otherwise not have access too, and I get to meet exciting people through them.  I also introduce people to the groups – their web platforms show great examples of what practice based research is.

- How do you balance your work as PhD student and practitioner?

I see my practice as holistic so I try to incorporate both into all my activities.  Some areas of my practice are less directly related to my research (my commercial making for example), but still link in through my material, aesthetic and ethical choices.  The balance challenge is more between time for work and time not for work!  I am lucky though that I am excited by what I do, so even when I am working a long week I still generally find it enjoyable.

- Why did you choose UAL to do a PhD and how has your experience been so far?

I chose UAL as I had done my BA and MA’s there, I was familiar with the university sites and systems and felt this would make the transition to PhD easier.  I knew that I would get the support I needed, be able to work with the supervisory team I wanted and that, as my proposal was in line with the university tenets, I had the greatest chance I could give myself of being awarded the scholarship I needed.  UAL has a strong reputation for practice based research and the practitioners who work there are well recognised, this was also important to me as was access to the workshops, libraries and technicians.

Related links:

Visit Bridget’s personal website

Fashion and the Senses Symposium 2015

FATS

The Fashion and the Senses symposium will be an international multi-disciplinary meeting and discussion forum for academics, practitioners, industry professionals and postgraduate students with a shared interest in fashion and the senses. This initial dialogue will inform ‘The International Conference on Fashion and the Senses’ taking place at London College of Fashion in 2016.

Sensation is fundamental to our experience of the world. Shaped by culture, gender, and class, the senses mediate between mind and the body, idea and object, self and environment.” (The Senses and Society).

Fashion too, sits at the boundary between the body and the external and social world. Drawing on fashion in its broadest sense, with cultural, design and brand marketing perspectives, the symposium presents opportunities to explore the heightened interest in sensorial research and practice. These perspectives within fashion research seldom merge, yet bringing together what are often quite distinct discourses encourages debate and cross-fertilisation of ideas. Guest speakers from the forefront of their disciplines, along with early career researchers have been invited to present their work and reflect upon this emerging field. With an emphasis on panel discussion, knowledge exchange and audience debate, the symposium aims to explore differences and convergences and suggest avenues for future research and collaboration in this area. Attendance at the symposium is open to all, although space is limited.

Questions to be debated include:

  • What are the social, cultural and political dimensions of sensory engagement with fashion and dress?
  • How might multi-sensory research be used to reflect upon existing fashion theory?
  • Can making and thinking through the senses encourage critical thinking and innovative design?
  • How might sensory design be applied to solutions for problems such as sustainability, wellbeing and ethical production?
  • How are fashion brands using sensory dimensions to connect with consumers?
  • What are the opportunities, challenges and impact of multi-sensory environments?
  • What does the future look like for sensorial fashion spaces?
  • Are there innovative sensory methodologies that can be applied to the study and practice of fashion?
  • How might inter-disciplinary knowledge exchange in this field encourage future collaborations within and between the fashion academy and the fashion industry?

Speakers |

Keynote

Professor Michael Bull – Professor of Sound Studies School of Media, Film and Music
University of Sussex, UK. Managing Editor of The Senses and Society Journal.

Keynote

Professor Joanne B. Eicher – Regents Professor Emeritor Department of Design, Housing and Apparel, University of Minnesota, USA. Pioneer of the sensory approach in dress studies. Editor-in-Chief of Encyclopedia of World Dress and Fashion.

Keynote

Professor Bertil Hulten – Professor of Marketing Department of Marketing
Linnaeus University, Sweden. Pioneer in the field of retail and sensory marketing research.

Keynote

Professor Charles Spence – Professor of Experimental Psychology, Head of the Crossmodal research laboratory, Director of Graduate studies and Fellow of Somerville College, University of Oxford, UK. Pioneer of experiential psychology using multisensory approaches.

Dr Jenny Tillotson – Reader in Sensory Fashion
Central Saint Martins, University of the Arts London, UK. Pioneer of eScent® wearable scent technologies.

Dr Eugenie Shinkle – Reader in Photography Department of Photography and Film
University of Westminster, London, UK. Researcher in the field of fashion photography, affect and the senses.

Ninela Ivanova – PhD candidate
Design for Body & Material Research Centre Kingston University, UK. Researcher in design mechanisms intersecting fashion material, sensory experiences and the human body.

Important dates |

1st January 2015 – Early bird registration closes

24th March 2015 – Registration closes

27th March 2015 – Symposium

Registration and fees |

— Industry £150
— Industry early bird £130
— Academic £120
— Academic early bird £100
— Non UAL student £35 (places limited)
— UAL staff and students no fee (places limited)

The registration fee covers documentation, coffee breaks, lunch and drinks reception.

Related links

Date and Venue |

27th March 2015 09.00-19.00

Rootstein Hopkins Space, London College of Fashion, 20 John Prince’s Street, London, W1G 0BJ.

Located in the heart of central London, at Oxford Circus (Central, Victoria and Piccadilly London underground lines).

Organising Chairs |

Bethan Alexander Graduate School, London College of Fashion, UAL, London, UK

Sara Chong Kwan Graduate School, London College of Fashion, UAL, London, UK

Organised by the London College of Fashion with the support of the LCF Research Office.

Dr Corinne Silva, Post Doc Research Fellow at LCC included in Aesthetica’s The Next Generation

Dr Corinne Silva was awarded a PhD from London College of Communication this year and has since become a Post Doctoral Research Fellow and  has been included in Aesthetica’s The Next Generation: emerging photographers that are shaping the future of the image-based practice. Find out more about Corinne’s experience at LCC and her flourishing career.

  • Tell us what it means to you be included in Aesthetica’s The Next Generation

One of the intentions with my work is to rupture specific ways of looking, of reading photographs and reading landscape, so it feels like an acknowledgement of my contribution to  contemporary photographic discourse.

  • Where do you mostly work/research, in your studio/at LCC or in the library, if a library, which is your favourite?

I love the Stuart Hall Library at INIVA, it’s comfortable and homely, but just library-ish enough to create the right atmosphere for disciplined work. And they have such a great collection of exhibition catalogues and artist’s films.

I have a studio in Dalston, which I share with a friend and collaborator, artist and video editor Lara Garcia Reyne. We begin most days discussing our joint or individual projects. I also have ‘critical friendships’ with my peers at PARC (Photography and the Archive Research Centre) and UAL. This space to discuss and be challenged is so important, and it keeps me excited about my work. It’s hard to be a freelance artist working alone, trying to make things happen. Discussion and collaboration with peers keeps the energy going and reminds me how much fun it is.

  • Why did you choose to study your PhD at LCC? Was it a good experience?

LCC felt like the obvious choice given its reputation for photography, the impressive list of artists teaching there, and the vast experience and specific research interests of my supervisors. I went to an open day and had a really good discussion with Professor Angus Carlyle who was very enthusiastic about my project and helped me shape my research question.

I have always hated institutions – the buildings as much as the social structure. They make me want to flee immediately. But I have a completely different relationship with LCC. It has a good – slightly messy, slightly chaotic – energy. All the people I work with are so committed to what they do, and there is an academic rigor as well as an understanding of the value of practice as research.

The joy of being able to access such impressive practitioners and theorists at LCC and across UAL made my PhD a rich experience. Alongside my own research PARC-led events, I also collaborated with members of TrAIN (Research Centre for Transnational Art, Identity and Nation), organising cross-disciplinary conferences and events around our shared research interests. These connections have endured and I am now part of a wider inter-disciplinary research community across the University.

  • What was the transition from PhD researcher to Research Fellow like?

As an artist doing a practice-based doctorate, completing my PhD didn’t draw a line under the work. All my individual photographic and video projects pivot around the same inquiries. One project always unfolds a new set of questions, which I then try and tackle in the next work. So while perhaps there wasn’t the same sense of satisfaction of completion, it has meant that there’s no rupture; with the support of the Fellowship I have simply carried on researching and producing.

I have been enormously lucky to have the continued support of Professor Val Williams and PARC. Through a partnership with two public space galleries and PARC, I’m now planning a solo show and publication of Garden State, work I made as part of my doctorate. I’m also developing an ambitious new art production and networking project, Rocks & Fortresses. Moving between art and academic spheres suits my research-based approach. This new work will be about making links between art and academic institutions, and presenting work through different platforms.

Students from RMIT University, Melbourne visit LCC for graphic design workshop

RMIT 2014

RMIT students combine word and image. Photography © Vladimir Molico

London College of Communication recently hosted a group of students from RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia for a word- and image-based design workshop.

The students collaborated with MA Graphic Design Lead Tutor Vanessa Price to generate material in response to the immediate vicinity of the Elephant and Castle.

We asked Vanessa to tell us more about this workshop and the research project from which it developed:

Through the cityscape of the Elephant and the texts and narratives of its everyday life, the RMIT workshop re-imagined how graphic design could enable us to become more ‘writerly readers’ of our visual culture.

The collaboration and knowledge-sharing with RMIT is ongoing as students continue to develop the project back in Melbourne.

‘Writerly Readers’ is the ongoing research project I lead at LCC. The research has arisen from an archive of the practice-based Writerly Readers workshop undertaken by postgraduate students within the School of Design.

Since 2011, the visual case study for this word and image workshop has been the immediate area around LCC: the Elephant and Castle.

The workshop asks participants to consider how we create and receive visual messages and argues for a model of design through which we can question the provenance of visual texts and the role of graphic design within the wider framework of visual communication.

As graphic design becomes increasingly synonymous with a contemporary visual discourse dominated by commercial advertising culture, a case emerges to develop a more collaborative process that could question the role of graphic design within the visual spectacle.

In considering relationships between authoring and receiving visual messages, the project argues for a model of design that invites the viewer to become more writerly readers of visual meaning.

group at wall

Photography © Vladimir Molico

Read about MA Graphic Design

Read Vanessa Price’s staff profile

Read more about Research at LCC

The post Students from RMIT University, Melbourne visit LCC for graphic design workshop appeared first on London College of Communication Blog.

Research // Grace Adam draws a crowd

big draw setting up

Preparing for The Big Draw. Image © Grace Adam

On Monday 20 October, students, staff and passers-by were treated to an exciting pop-up drawing session in the Typo cafe by LCC lead design tutor Grace Adam as part of Inside Out Festival 2014.

Grace’s event, ‘Framing the Elephant’, invited people to stop, look and draw, taking 10 minutes or half an hour to create a fast, fun drawing of the view from inside the College.

The highlight of #framingtheelephant - a part of #lccgradschool! #nofilter

Instagram @fbigos

A brilliant drawing by @jhartley95 at @lcclondon #framingtheelephant

Instagram @fbigos

Grace has also recently appeared on ‘Daily Brunch with Ocado‘, demonstrating a few fun and unusual ways to get drawing.

Watch the video here [starts 26:59]

Speaking about her wider involvement in ‘The Big Draw’, a national festival of drawing with events held around the country, Grace told presenters Tim Lovejoy and Simon Rimmer:

“The Big Draw was set up to get people re-engaged with drawing, having fun, and connecting to the world in a different way [...] I think it’s considered a childish thing to do, and we communicate with text. Drawing is not taken so seriously, which is a shame. It’s essential.

“I think everybody is obsessed by ‘getting it right’ and getting it to look like the real world, but your drawing will be different from my drawing. You express yourself as an individual and that’s important.

“Drawing is a pleasure, drawing is a way to look at the world, to communicate, to experiment, to explore. It’s a good thing and we’re losing it.”

If you’ve missed out this year, however, some of Grace’s own sculptural work is on show until Friday 31 October in ‘Modes of Remembrance’ at St Giles-in-the-Fields, exploring and responding to the idea of monuments and memorials within the church.

Read Grace Adam’s staff profile

Read more about Research at LCC

The post Research // Grace Adam draws a crowd appeared first on London College of Communication Blog.

Research // Grace Adam draws a crowd

big draw setting up

Preparing for The Big Draw. Image © Grace Adam

On Monday 20 October, students, staff and passers-by were treated to an exciting pop-up drawing session in the Typo cafe by LCC lead design tutor Grace Adam as part of Inside Out Festival 2014.

Grace’s event, ‘Framing the Elephant’, invited people to stop, look and draw, taking 10 minutes or half an hour to create a fast, fun drawing of the view from inside the College.

The highlight of #framingtheelephant - a part of #lccgradschool! #nofilter

Instagram @fbigos

A brilliant drawing by @jhartley95 at @lcclondon #framingtheelephant

Instagram @fbigos

Grace has also recently appeared on ‘Daily Brunch with Ocado‘, demonstrating a few fun and unusual ways to get drawing.

Watch the video here [starts 26:59]

Speaking about her wider involvement in ‘The Big Draw’, a national festival of drawing with events held around the country, Grace told presenters Tim Lovejoy and Simon Rimmer:

“The Big Draw was set up to get people re-engaged with drawing, having fun, and connecting to the world in a different way […} I think it’s considered a childish thing to do, and we communicate with text. Drawing is not taken so seriously, which is a shame. It’s essential.

“I think everybody is obsessed by ‘getting it right’ and getting it to look like the real world, but your drawing will be different from my drawing. You express yourself as an individual and that’s important.

“Drawing is a pleasure, drawing is a way to look at the world, to communicate, to experiment, to explore. It’s a good thing and we’re losing it.”

If you’ve missed out this year, however, some of Grace’s own sculptural work is on show until Friday 31 October in ‘Modes of Remembrance’ at St Giles-in-the-Fields, exploring and responding to the idea of monuments and memorials within the church.

Read Grace Adam’s staff profile

Read more about Research at LCC

The post Research // Grace Adam draws a crowd appeared first on London College of Communication Blog.

Fashioning Professionals Symposium

Gaby Schreiber

A SYMPOSIUM ON THE HISTORICAL AND CONTEMPORARY REPRESENTATION OF CULTURAL AND CREATIVE PROFESSIONS

CALL FOR PAPERS

Research Department, Victoria and Albert Museum, London 27 March 2015

Keynote Speaker: Dr. Agnès Rocamora

The labour market is increasingly made up of those working in the creative professions of fashion, art, design and advertising, but what does it mean to be defined and represented as a ‘creative professional’? From artist to curator; couturier to fashion intern; designer to art director; architect to design student; stylist to blogger; these professional identities can be viewed as social practices, enacted and performed through media, which includes the fashion press, lifestyle magazines, daily news, television, film, and the internet. Here social, cultural and professional identities are co-constructed. These professions and their professionals are both products of, and productive in meanings and values that inform our understanding and knowledge of culture, in both the past and present. They also vary in their representation according to different levels of expertise and career status.

Focusing on the representation of cultural and creative professions, Fashioning Professionals asks the following questions: How have photography and media worked to define and represent creative labour in particular ways? How have individuals represented and defined themselves as professionals in different fields of culture? How do different aspects of cultural identity, such as gender, class and ethnicity, inform these representations? How do different methodologies and disciplinary approaches enrich the study of cultural and creative professions? How can histories and theories of fashion and design contribute to a wider reading and understanding of the professions?

We welcome papers from a range of disciplinary and interdisciplinary perspectives that respond to and reflect upon these questions in relation to the following cultural sectors and their professions:

  • Art
  • Fashion
  • Advertising
  • Design
  • Architecture

Proposals: If you wish to present a paper, please submit a 250 word abstract in Word format to fashioningprofessionals@gmail.com

Abstracts are to include the following information:

  • Author(s)
  • Affiliation(s)
  • Email Address(es)
  • Title of Abstract
  • Body of Abstract

Deadline for Submissions: Monday 5 January 2015
Acceptance Confirmation: Monday 26 January 2015

Please note that there will be a £10 fee for attending the symposium, which will cover lunch, tea and coffees. Registration for the symposium will open in February 2015.

A Digitised Planning System: Scoping Study

logo_lg

Researchers at Central Saint Martins and the Design Against Crime Research Centre won a Creative Voucher Award to undertake a scoping study on digitised planning systems.

Funded by Creative Works London, this project is the starting phase of a long-term goal to develop and pilot a new digitised planning system for the UK. Geoffrey Makstutis (Course Leader of BA Architecture at CSM) and Mark Simpkins, of the (Design Against Crime Research Centre, UAL) working with the RIBA Policy Unit, are developing a scoping study for the project.

The project aims to provide both a means of allowing architects, designers, planners and developers a way of making use of a range of different types of data to improve the planning process and, crucially, to enable the public to become engaged in the processes that change the built environment – to understand the process, to participate the process and to inform policy at local, regional and national levels.

More info on the Creative Vouchers website.

The post A Digitised Planning System: Scoping Study appeared first on Central Saint Martins: News.

TEXTILE TOOLBOX online exhibition

Textile-Toolbox-online-exhibition.jpg-626x513

The TEXTILE TOOLBOX exhibition launches online on 13th November. It is a showcase of ten propositional design concepts inspired by Mistra research into the sustainability of the fashion and textile industry.

The exhibition platform functions as a research and public engagement 
tool formed around TED’s ‘The TEN’ – design strategies for innovative sustainability thinking and action. The exhibition proposes how these strategies can translate technical and scientific research breakthroughs into design concepts. The new products demonstrate the potential for progressing a sustainable fashion system with new materials, processes, applications and business models. The exhibits are a starting point for discussion – provocations, or ‘provotypes’ – showing us how design tools can create entirely new visions for the future of the industry. This unique online platform offers a global audience a glimpse of a sustainable future fashion industry. An industry that ultimately gives the consumer pleasure whilst also giving the planet and its inhabitants absolute consideration.

The final design pieces use a strategic ‘TEN’ approach to create beautiful fashions for style fans to savour, with aesthetics connecting and responding to the scientific research of the MISTRA Future Fashion consortium.

Exhibits:

1. Seamsdress, by Dr Kate Goldsworthy

2. A.S.A.P (Paper Cloth), by Prof Kay Politowicz, Sandy MacLennan (East Central), Dr Kate Goldsworthy, David Telfer (COS) and Dr Hjalmar Granberg (Innventia)

3. Shanghai Shirt by Prof Becky Earley (Research Profile) and Isabel Dodd

4. Inner/Outer Jacket by Clara Vuletich

5. DeNAture, by Miriam Ribul in collaboration with Hanna de la Motte (SP)

6. ReDressing Activism, by Prof Becky Earley, Emmeline Child and Bridget Harvey

7. Smörgåsbord, by Melanie Bowles (Research Profile) and Kathy Round

8. Sweaver, by Josefin Tissingh

9. Fast Refashion, by Prof Becky Earley

10. A Jumper to Lend, A Jumper to Mend, by Bridget Harvey

Resources:

The collaborations with scientists, academics and professionals, have lead to Tool Kits for action, instructions for making, resources for learning, and films to sit back and watch. International training tools and education models will be available from the site as a free download in the final report in June 2015.

Open Call:

We will also invite a global fashion design audience to submit their own sustainable future fashion projects to us, and selected works will be showcased in an open gallery on the site. We also invite reviewers to send us feedback on the exhibition and to contribute to our final project report. Get in touch for the opportunity to be part of this exciting process.

For more information:

Film // Festival success for LCC staff

72-82#2

Still from ’72-82′, William Raban.

Three members of LCC staff, William Raban, David Knight and Brad Butler, have recently been featured in film festivals around London, balancing their roles as academics and active practitioners.

Professor of Film William Raban had ’72-82′, his latest film, selected by 2014′s London Film Festival (LFF). ’72-82′ explores the first ten years of groundbreaking London arts organisation Acme Studios and their critical work in housing some of the most renowned artists of our time, such as Richard Deacon and Anthony Whishaw.

Despite having more than 50 films under his belt, William describes the making of ’72-82′ as a “completely new experience”, as it solely uses archival visual materials to revisit the formative years of the organisation.

In addition to screenings at the BFI and Acme Studios, the feature-length documentary will also be screened at LCC’s Inside Out Festival, where William is in conversation with acclaimed sculptor, the two-time Turner Prize-nominated Richard Wilson.

David Knight’s work as Senior Lecturer on BA (Hons) Film and Television at LCC has taken him beyond teaching, as he enjoys success as Director of Photography on ‘The Quiet Hour’, which was nominated for Best UK Feature Film at the 22nd Raindance Film Festival.

“It is hugely satisfying to bring my professional practice back to the classroom. Working at features level brings into play a whole new set of skills to disseminate through workshops at LCC,” said David.

Recently appointed LCC Research Fellow Brad Butler continues the trend with a screening of his short film, ‘The Unreliable Narrator, at this year’s LFF.

Read profiles of William Raban, David Knight and Brad Butler

Read about BA (Hons) Film and Television

Read about Brad Butler’s work at the Hayward Gallery

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