Archive for the ‘Research’ category

An interview with MFA Fine Art student Miroslav Pomichal

We caught up with MFA Fine Art student & Bloomberg New Contemporaries  2014  Artist, Miroslav Pomichal as he prepares for the Wimbledon College of ArtsMFA Fine Art, Postgraduate Summer Show 2014.

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Wimbledon College of Arts: Tell us about your current practice

Miroslav Pomichal: At the moment my work centres around large figurative paintings, and carved objects. I also make a lot of drawings, watercolours, digital paintings and collages.

I am really interested in the idea of authenticity in art. In one way it takes the form of my interest in traditional materials, the handmade, folk art; but bound up with this is the exploration of the authenticity of the modern art historical canon, by focusing on its source of early Modernism. The whitewashed canon of today often omits to note that the idea of ‘progress’ which it now embodies was actually wrapped up in all sorts of traditional and even reactionary ideas and morality; Picasso’s dreams of patriarchal society, Kandinsky’s theories on peasant art production and mysticism; not to mention van Gogh’s messianic Christianity, Gauguin’s tropical fantasies or the German Expressionists’ attempts at recreating what they termed ‘tribal’ aesthetics.

WCA: How are you preparing for the MFA Fine Art Summer Show?

MP: I have been working towards the show since Christmas, as I work quite slowly. So now I am busy helping out with the organising of the show, publication materials, and so on. I even get to design a stamp!

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WCA: Please tell us about your experience with Bloomberg New Contemporaries.

MP: I have had an extremely positive experience. The BNC does not require CVs, or tortuous artist statements. More importantly, they bear the entire costs of the art transport for shortlisted works; and those works not chosen are safely delivered to you for free. As far as I know it is the only institution (can I call it that?) with such a long and illustrious history which has not wavered or morphed into something different over the years. Last year’s opening at the ICA, with its hundreds of people queuing outside waiting to go in, made an impression on me. That kind of attendance and esteem only comes with a long term consistency and integrity.

WCA: What’s next for you following graduation?

MP: I am taking a working break; I have always had an interest in Byzantine art and philosophy and I need to consider whether to begin on a body of work which would incorporate certain elements of this interest.

WCA: What has your time studying at Wimbledon been like?

MP: I could not have chosen a better college to study in, or had a better time. It is a top London art college with a long history, but it has an atmosphere like no other; nestling in the leafy suburbs, with many friends you can make across courses and disciplines, it is very encouraging but still cutting edge. The library is great; the technicians excellent, and the canteen food to die for.

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WCA: What did you find was the most valuable transferable skill you learnt whilst studying at the College?

MP: I learnt that the most important thing in human interaction, whether personal or professional, is to be physically present. Only being in a studio, or office, or workshop, can you work out imaginative solutions to problems which at first seem insurmountable.

WCA: Any advice for future MFA Fine Art students?

MP: From what I suggested previously – be in college as much as you can, because only in that way can you meet surprising people, let your eye drop on a previously unsuspected book in the library, or discover an intriguing process in a workshop. A lot can happen to your practice and thinking from chance encounters in the right place. And that is why people come to college, surely!

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Wimbledon College of Arts Postgraduate MFA Fine Art Show 2014
Catch the ‘up and coming’ artists of tomorrow at the Wimbledon College of Arts  MFA Fine Art Summer Show featuring work by graduating students.
Private View: Thursday 3rd July 6pm – 9pm
Then open to general public: Friday 4th July- 11am – 8pm
Saturday 5th July - 11am – 5pm
Sunday 6th July  - closed
Monday 7th July - 10am – 8pm
Tuesday 8th July - 10am – 8pm
Wednesday 9th July - 10am – 8pm
Thursday 10th July - 10am -5pm

The post An interview with MFA Fine Art student Miroslav Pomichal appeared first on Wimbledon College of Arts Blog.

Research // William Raban introduces ’72-82′ screening at journal launch

72-82

Still from ’72-82′, William Raban. Image courtesy the artist.

On Sunday 22 June, filmmaker and LCC Professor of Film William Raban introduced a screening of his latest work at the launch of creative journal NOIT-2.

NOIT is produced by Flat Time House, a gallery, archive and artist’s residency space in the former home and studio of conceptual artist John Latham, in conjunction with Camberwell Press.

A biannual journal, it explores Latham’s artwork and key theoretical concerns such as the role of the artist, art and science, time, language and value/belief systems.

This second edition of the journal has been guest edited by Lisa Le Feuvre, Head of Sculpture Studies at the Henry Moore Institute, and contains new writing, artists’ contributions and original research.

The London launch took place at Flat Time House and was accompanied by a special preview screening (with introduction) of William Raban’s new film ’72-82′, which documents ten years of London’s ACME gallery.

’72-82′ features footage of pyrotechnic performances by sculptor and performance artist Stephen Cripps, tying in with NOIT-2′s theme of artists and burning.

Rights of Passage

Still from ‘Rights of Passage’, William Raban. Image courtesy the artist.

Also screened at the launch event was ‘Rights of Passage’ (1997), a short film made by William documenting the percussion and pyrotechnic event of the same name by artist and musician Paul Burwell.

Read more about Research at London College of Communication.

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Labours of love and commercial savvy at the LCF BA Design Exhibition 2014

Geraldine Delleme, BA (Hons) Cordwainers Footwear: Product Design and Development Annie Berner, BA (Hons) Fashion Jewellery Yu Jung Lee, BA (Hons) Cordwainers Footwear: Product Design and Development LCF BA Design Exhibition 2014 Leo Carlton, BA (Hons) Cordwainers Fashion Bags and Accessories: Product Design and Innovation Edyta Slabonska, BA (Hons) Cordwainers Fashion Bags and Accessories: Product Design and Innovation and Iwona Krzynowek, BA (Hons) Cordwainers Fashion Bags and Accessories: Product Design and Innovation. Patricia Quille, BA (Hons) Cordwainers Footwear: Product Design and Development Laura Hill, BA (Hons) Fashion Jewellery Sofie Birkin’s, BA (Hons) Cordwainers Footwear: Product Design and Development LCF BA Design Exhibition 2014 Yein Chein Yeung, BA (Hons) Fashion Jewellery LCF BA Design Exhibition 2014

This year’s design graduates and future tastemakers of the fashion industry made their debut in Shoreditch last night and their work will be on display until 22nd June.

Still animated from the BA14 catwalk show, industry professionals and peers attended the exhibition opening for the School of Design and Technology last night. It was a celebration of refinement, passion and potential. Three years worth of skill and experience were evident in the fearless use of innovative materials and bold structures.

Roosa Tulvio’s, BA (Hons) Cordwainers Fashion Bags and Accessories: Product Design and Innovation, collection of elegant yet directional leather pieces combined 3D scanning and printing with hand embroidery. While Jasmine Ellis, Yena Ahn and Carl Blanche, all BA (Hons) Cordwainers Footwear: Product Design and Development, used a variety of materials to create playful collections evoking both nostalgia and futurism.

Inspired by the merging of man and machine, Annie Berner’s, BA (Hons) Fashion Jewellery, pieces demonstrated a mastering of materials. Earrings that appeared heavy duty were in fact lightweight and an Art Deco twist added sophistication. She’s currently a finalist in the International Talent Support competition in Italy where the prize is an internship with Swarovski. “I don’t really feel like a graduate yet. This made it feel more real today, but I’m still very busy.”

Designs were highly conceptual with collections such as Sofie Birkin’s, BA (Hons) Cordwainers Footwear: Product Design and Development, line of shoes named ‘The Witch Hunt’ showing a depth of research. Each pair captures a different victim’s personal experience of the Salem witch trials in a series of intricate etchings. Sofie explained more:

“The prints took three weeks alone but I wanted to spend a lot of time making them so they were more like objects than just shoes. They were a labour of love: I didn’t go into it with a commercial mindset, I wanted to do something I would really be proud of afterwards.”

Her next steps are applying for an MA in History in America while developing her own jewellery and accessories label.

The graduates weren’t short of ambition, with footwear designer Saul Robayna, BA (Hons) Cordwainers Footwear: Product Design and Development, also planning to set up his own business:

“It’s the right time, I’m very happy with my collection. The concept began as very dark with different stages of Victorian mourning attire but then in quite a positive way it became about showing the beauty of a woman and a way of overcoming pain.”

The result is a line of sexy, feminine footwear bound in black lace, conceptual yet commercial.

“Keep your personality, keep your edge but in the end you want a job or to develop your own career,” he says. “Every year the exhibition is good but this year you can definitely see there is commercial awareness in many different fields.”

The industry welcomes this innovation and originality with open arms but there is also the guaranteed high-standards set by the college. It’s a principle every graduate leaves with and will remember: “LCF wants the best and it wants the best for us”.

The post Labours of love and commercial savvy at the LCF BA Design Exhibition 2014 appeared first on LCF News.

Labours of love and commercial savvy at the LCF BA Design Exhibition 2014

Geraldine Delleme, BA (Hons) Cordwainers Footwear: Product Design and Development Annie Berner, BA (Hons) Fashion Jewellery Yu Jung Lee, BA (Hons) Cordwainers Footwear: Product Design and Development LCF BA Design Exhibition 2014 Leo Carlton, BA (Hons) Cordwainers Fashion Bags and Accessories: Product Design and Innovation Edyta Slabonska, BA (Hons) Cordwainers Fashion Bags and Accessories: Product Design and Innovation and Iwona Krzynowek, BA (Hons) Cordwainers Fashion Bags and Accessories: Product Design and Innovation. Patricia Quille, BA (Hons) Cordwainers Footwear: Product Design and Development Laura Hill, BA (Hons) Fashion Jewellery Sofie Birkin’s, BA (Hons) Cordwainers Footwear: Product Design and Development LCF BA Design Exhibition 2014 Yein Chein Yeung, BA (Hons) Fashion Jewellery LCF BA Design Exhibition 2014

This year’s design graduates and future tastemakers of the fashion industry made their debut in Shoreditch last night and their work will be on display until 22nd June.

Still animated from the BA14 catwalk show, industry professionals and peers attended the exhibition opening for the School of Design and Technology last night. It was a celebration of refinement, passion and potential. Three years worth of skill and experience were evident in the fearless use of innovative materials and bold structures.

Roosa Tulvio’s, BA (Hons) Cordwainers Fashion Bags and Accessories: Product Design and Innovation, collection of elegant yet directional leather pieces combined 3D scanning and printing with hand embroidery. While Jasmine Ellis, Yena Ahn and Carl Blanche, all BA (Hons) Cordwainers Footwear: Product Design and Development, used a variety of materials to create playful collections evoking both nostalgia and futurism.

Inspired by the merging of man and machine, Annie Berner’s, BA (Hons) Fashion Jewellery, pieces demonstrated a mastering of materials. Earrings that appeared heavy duty were in fact lightweight and an Art Deco twist added sophistication. She’s currently a finalist in the International Talent Support competition in Italy where the prize is an internship with Swarovski. “I don’t really feel like a graduate yet. This made it feel more real today, but I’m still very busy.”

Designs were highly conceptual with collections such as Sofie Birkin’s, BA (Hons) Cordwainers Footwear: Product Design and Development, line of shoes named ‘The Witch Hunt’ showing a depth of research. Each pair captures a different victim’s personal experience of the Salem witch trials in a series of intricate etchings. Sofie explained more:

“The prints took three weeks alone but I wanted to spend a lot of time making them so they were more like objects than just shoes. They were a labour of love: I didn’t go into it with a commercial mindset, I wanted to do something I would really be proud of afterwards.”

Her next steps are applying for an MA in History in America while developing her own jewellery and accessories label.

The graduates weren’t short of ambition, with footwear designer Saul Robayna, BA (Hons) Cordwainers Footwear: Product Design and Development, also planning to set up his own business:

“It’s the right time, I’m very happy with my collection. The concept began as very dark with different stages of Victorian mourning attire but then in quite a positive way it became about showing the beauty of a woman and a way of overcoming pain.”

The result is a line of sexy, feminine footwear bound in black lace, conceptual yet commercial.

“Keep your personality, keep your edge but in the end you want a job or to develop your own career,” he says. “Every year the exhibition is good but this year you can definitely see there is commercial awareness in many different fields.”

The industry welcomes this innovation and originality with open arms but there is also the guaranteed high-standards set by the college. It’s a principle every graduate leaves with and will remember: “LCF wants the best and it wants the best for us”.

The post Labours of love and commercial savvy at the LCF BA Design Exhibition 2014 appeared first on LCF News.

Interview with the Chairs of Black Art and Design at UAL

Missionary Position II, 1985 by Sonia Boyce. Image courtesy of Tate.


Sonia Boyce, Missionary Position II, 1985. Currently on show in BP Walk through British Art at Tate Britain. Photo: Tate, © Sonia Boyce.

Last year, thirteen new professors were appointed at University of the Arts London in a major investment intended to enrich students’ academic experience. These new ‘Chairs’ brought leading experts to the University to work across a number of areas of interest within the creative disciplines. 

One of these newly created positions was Chair of Black Art and Design, the first position of its kind in a UK art school dedicated to the study of work by black and minority ethnic artists. It is held jointly by artist Sonia Boyce and curator Paul Goodwin, who are primarily sited at the CCW (Chelsea, Camberwell and Wimbledon) Graduate School while working across UAL to develop approaches alongside staff, students and practitioners further a-field, that will highlight the various contributions of black artists to contemporary art and design debates and practices.

Paul Goodwin and Sonia Boyce at University of the Arts London in 2013.

Paul Goodwin and Sonia Boyce at University of the Arts London in 2013.

Sonia came to prominence in the early 1980s as a key figure in the burgeoning black British art-scene of that time, becoming one of the youngest artists of her generation to have her work purchased by the Tate Gallery, with paintings that spoke about racial identity and gender in Britain. Indeed, the work, Missionary Position II from 1985, reproduced at the top of this article, is currently on show in Tate Britain’s BP Walk through British Art exhibition. Since the 1990s Boyce’s practice has taken a more multi-media and improvisational approach by bringing people together to speak or sing about the past and the present.

Paul is an independent curator, urbanist and lecturer based in London. From 2008 until 2012 Paul was Curator of Cross Cultural Programmes and then Curator of Contemporary Art at Tate Britain. In these roles, he curated The Tate Cross Cultural Programme – a pioneering programme of talks, symposia, workshops and live art events that included groundbreaking and internationally renowned events and exhibitions.

Of the creation of the post, Paul said: “This post is a historic opportunity to consolidate and make visible the incredible work and contributions of black and diasporic artists within the context of the art school.  The aim is to inspire all students across the university.”

Having been in position for five months now, we asked Sonia and Paul to answer some questions to give us an insight into their plans for the role as they settle in.

What does it mean to be a University Chair in Black Art and Design?
It is quite thrilling to think that this is the first time such a professorial role has been created in the UK. It’s a great opportunity to shine a light on historic and emerging practices of a wide range of African and Asian diasporic artists and their important but relatively neglected role in shaping art and design in the UK. We want to share this knowledge with the UAL community, irrespective of disciplines.

What do you hope to achieve in this role?
It’s about building on the huge knowledge base around Black Art and Design practices that already exists within and across UAL. The main ambition is for the wider discussions and practices around Black Art and Design to become commonplace within the learning environment. We see our role as facilitators, to bring artists, curators, thinkers and practices into the everyday mix of the cultural life here at UAL.

Starting from this great resource we want to build on the pioneering special collections around Black Art practice in the library collections and develop that resource in a creative manner and to garner knowledge about other collections. Our ambition here is for UAL to be a hub for collecting and developing knowledge around these archival resources. We also want to re-engage the many alumni who have gone on to create a legacy for UAL, facilitate access to and discussion of key art works and involve students at every stage in the process of these projects.

 What message would you most like to give to students about Black Art and Design?
We are using the term ‘Black’ to make reference to people of African and Asian diasporas. However, what we want to emphasise is that ‘Black Art’ has and continues to be a set of practices that have intrinsically been part of the broader field of contemporary art. From the outset Black Art has always refered to the international and the diasporic. We believe this global dimension will greatly enhance students development in both studio practice and theory.

Can you give us an idea of some of the projects you are working on and how students will be involved?
We have begun a programme of inviting leading artists and curators to engage directly with students and the teaching programmes. This will be extended to include a more public programme by devising an ambitious series of creative projects working with artists, designers, curators and researchers. Some of the projects we are currently developing in which students will be invited to participate include: an international curatorial collaboration around performance and the politics of carnival, a series of displays and discussions around art, culture and technology, and opportunities for international student residencies and placements.

Ellen Gallagher talking to Chelsea students at Hauser & Wirth.  Image courtesy of Jeff Dennis, lecturer on Fine Art.

Ellen Gallagher talking to Chelsea students at Hauser & Wirth. Image courtesy of Jeff Dennis, lecturer on Fine Art.

Indeed, work has already began on several of these exciting projects. Earlier this term, students on the BA Fine Art course at Chelsea College of Arts were treated to a tour and in conversation event with artist Ellen Gallagher at her exhibition at Hauser & Wirth. Ellen, who enjoyed a retrospective at Tate Britain in 2013, later came to continue that conversation with students in their studios at Chelsea, looking at their work and offering advice. This is something that Sonia and Paul hope to repeat across other colleges during their time as Chairs. “We’re looking for opportuntiies for students to have that intimate engagement with artists, thinkers, writers and curators” explains Sonia.

The student experience is fundamental to the work that Sonia and Paul have planned. Aware that academic achievement and progression of black and minority ethnic students at UAL has so far followed a disturbing national trend and does not equate with that of their white colleagues, they aim to provide academic leadership in this area, working towards redressing this current imbalance through practice, implementing real change that would impact on all students and boost their opportunities for success.

Ellen Gallagher talking to students at Chelsea College of Arts. Image courtesy of Jeff Dennis, lecturer on Fine Art.

Ellen Gallagher talking to students at Chelsea College of Arts. Image courtesy of Jeff Dennis, lecturer on Fine Art.

George Blacklock, Dean of Chelsea College of Arts, explained: “With Chelsea’s alumni including such eminent black and minority ethnic artists and designers such as Chris Ofili, Frank Bowling, Trevor Robinson, Steve McQueen, Anish Kapoor, Haroon Mirza and Marika Mori it is my feeling that the College is in an excellent position to support this new post, and believe we are now able to both improve the visibility of, and significantly re-evaluate the fantastic work of black and minority ethnic artists and designers and its place in the national canon. This will, in turn create a more representative body of work for new students to measure themselves by, as they develop their studies at UAL.

It is our hope that the work of the Professors of Black Art and Design will initiate informed change at all levels of the University. This post will work with other University initiatives such as Shades of Noir to continue to combat the disparity in achievement that we see in our students from a grass-roots perspective.”

No Woman, No Cry 1998 by Chris Ofili. Image courtesy of Tate.

No Woman, No Cry 1998 by Chris Ofili. Image courtesy of Tate.

Even before next term starts, it will be full steam ahead with more exciting collaborations and projects. Artist and curator of performance Claire Tancons is working with 23 students on the cross-dimensional (XD) pathway of CSM’s BA Fine Art course on her project Up Hill Down Hall which will take place at Tate Modern on 23 August this year, during the summer break. The project will bring Carnival into the the Turbine Hall, turning the costumed parade into a contemporary art procession. Following this event, the students will develop their own event for January 2015, celebrating the 50th anniversary of carnival in London.

Then in October Chelsea will host an exhibition of film curator June Givanni’s Pan-African Cinema Archive in its Triangle and Cook House exhibition spaces. Running concurrently with the Fireze Art Fair, this show will aim to speak to the international art audiences that visit London in the autumn as well as students and academic staff. A collaboration with Birkbeck University, Sonia and Paul will also work with students on the newly validated MA Curating and Collections course to develop the exhibition.

These projects are just the start of the ambitious programme of work that the new Chairs hope will have a big impact on current and future students. As Sonia said when she took up the post: “I think Paul and I will make a good team: concentrating not only on an exciting legacy of practice, but curious about emerging practices and debates. I believe we all have some exciting work ahead of us.”

Find out more about the new Chairs at University of the Arts London on our news blog.

Find out more about studying at Chelsea on our course pages.

LCF’s Dr Alison James is awarded the accolade of a National Teaching Fellowship

Dr Alison James Awarded National Teaching Fellowship

Dr Alison James Awarded National Teaching Fellowship

The Higher Education Academy (HEA) has, announced that London College of Fashion’s Dr Alison James, Associate Dean for Learning and Teaching is one of just 55 higher education staff who have been awarded a National Teaching Fellowship, the country’s most prestigious award for excellence in higher education teaching and support for learning.

Alison was chosen from over 180 nominations submitted by higher education institutions across England, Northern Ireland and Wales and wins an incredible £10,000 which will be used to support her professional development and aspects of her teaching.

Professor Frances Corner OBE, Head of London College of Fashion comments on Alison’s award,

“Over her 8 years, as Head of Learning & Teaching and more recently as Associate Dean of Learning & Teaching Dr Alison James has proved herself to be not only a highly effective teacher, but also a senior academic capable of inspiring others to develop their own professional practice in innovative and highly creative ways, which they themselves might not have alighted upon, were it not for her supportive and generous approach to her role. We are absolutely delighted and very proud that Alison’s incredible work has been recognised through this prestigious award.”

Dr Alison James has worked in creative arts education in a variety of roles, across all levels and many subjects – as educational and staff developer, researcher and policy maker and teacher. Her trademark is creative and interactive approaches to pedagogy with a high level of staff and student involvement and plenty of humour to go with it. A fascination with alternative and creative approaches has led Alison to experiment with LEGO® as a research tool and she is an accredited facilitator of LEGO® SERIOUS PLAY®. She uses this methodology extensively to develop reflective thinking on a range of curriculum design and delivery issues, as well as for helping staff and students explore matters of personal importance.

All staff at London College of Fashion would like to congratulate Alison on all her hard work and her recent fellowship award.

Read more…

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Aesthetic Therapy Course at LCF Leads Beauty Industry

Aesthetic Therapy Short course at LCF

Aesthetic Therapy short course at LCF

LCF’s Aesthetic Therapy course is leading the way in the beauty industry, now in its second year the 10-week course which was the first of its kind in the UK is thriving.

The training offers students essential knowledge of human anatomy, physiology and skin biology. Trainees are also given explanations of the latest treatments and procedures developed in consultation with Harley Street Skin, who specialise in a wide range of treatments including pioneering the use and development of stem cell therapies.

Yvonne Mills, Course Leader of Foundation Science Beauty and Spa Management & Aesthetic Therapist Short Course Leader said: “LCF is one of the leading and most respected institutions in the UK to study beauty therapy.  We have utilised our ever expanding industry contacts and knowledge to create an Aesthetic Therapist short course, incorporating in-depth theory and hands on workshops.

“The curriculum will be delivered by some of the leading brands within the Aesthetic industry in order to equip the next generation of candidates with the tools and techniques required to meet the growing demand from the aesthetic therapy industry nationwide.”

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Fashion & Politics: the second annual LCF Research Hubs conference

The second annual LCF Research Hubs Conference took place last week, engaging with the topic of fashion and politics. London College of Fashion has seven research hubs; investigating fashion in the very widest sense, their focus ranges from history to pedagogy, media to performance, brand management and more. The hubs came together to curate a diverse programme of speakers, with presentations from LCF research staff and students as well as visiting academics.

The opening session, entitled ‘Fashion and Politics’, was delivered by keynote speaker and Visiting Professor at LCF Elizabeth Wilson, an independent scholar and author known for her writing on feminism and popular culture. Wilson presented a brief history of class and political dress, from the French Revolution and the ‘costumed poverty’ of bohemians, to Yves Saint Laurent’s Beatnik collection, which co-opted the styles of students and dissidents, to the present day ‘politics of personality’ epitomised by The Sartorialist street-style blog. Wilson noted that, due to the breakdown of accepted and expected class dress codes, it is harder today than ever before to mark yourself out as a dissident; to wear your politics on your sleeve. Giving the example of a wealthy man wearing jeans and trainers to the opera, she also suggested that it is now much harder to decipher appropriate dress for formal events than in the past, when fashion was policed more rigorously.

During the day, attendees heard about Marx and his overcoat, sewing machines and the exploitation of garment workers (Dr Tony Sullivan); the American Civil War and the Massachusetts 54th, the first battalion of black men, and John S Rock, the polymath who coined the phrase “black is beautiful” (Dr Eldrid Herrington); the Taksim Square demonstrations and Istanbul Pride (Serkan Delice); Roma culture and stereotypes in socialist Yugoslavia, through the Aleksandar Petrovic film “I Even Met Happy Gypsies” (Vlastimir Sudar); teenage rebellion and fashion in post-war socialist Europe (Dr Djurdja Bartlett); eugenics, gender and fashion magazines in inter-war Romania (Sonia Andras); ‘Aware: Art, Fashion and Identity’, a Royal Academy of the Arts exhibition (Lucy Orta); the contradictions and cruelties of capitalism, epitomised by the fashion industry (Tansy Hoskins); and class, aspiration, respect and pop music videos (Professor Lorraine Gamman, CSM lecturer).

Many attendees joined in on Twitter. You can view the stream of comments by viewing the hashtag, #fashpolitics.

London College of Fashion has seven research hubs and two research centres:

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Research announce: Sabbatical Leave Scheme (Round 9) and the UAL Research Mentoring Scheme

UAL Research Sabbatical Leave Scheme (Round 9) announced

The deadline for applications is 4pm on Wednesday 2 July 2014
Application forms and guidance can be found on the Staff Portal:  https://myintranet.arts.ac.uk/staffonly/research/research-sabbatical-leave/

Completed applications should be sent as an email attachment to Naomi O’Connor researchenquiries@arts.ac.uk

UAL Research Mentoring Scheme launched

The purpose of research mentoring is to give the individual a clearer view of their role in research.  The aim of the UAL Research Mentoring Scheme is to support and develop the research careers of UAL academic staff.
The mentoring scheme is voluntary, and the contents of the meetings are confidential.  It is open to all academic staff on full time or fractional contracts (at least 0.2).
The time allocated to mentoring will be between a range of three and six hours; there will normally be three meetings a year and mentoring will be for one year.  At the end of each year, the College Research Committee will request from each mentor the number of meetings that took place and identify the general topic(s) discussed. Each mentor will be allocated up to six hours per member of staff within the UAL workload model.

More information and the application form can be found on the Staff Portal: https://myintranet.arts.ac.uk/staffonly/research/research-mentoring-scheme/

The Centre for Fashion Curation launches by debating the disciplines

Debating the Disciplines with the Fashion Curation

Debating the Disciplines with the Centre for Fashion Curation

Chaired by Carol Tulloch (UAL Senior Research Fellow in Black Visual Culture), The Centre for Fashion Curation launched with a debate in which panellists discussed the issues and preoccupations surrounding the development of fashion curation as an academic discipline.

Each curator began the evening with a brief introduction to themselves and their work, and on the panel were an exciting collection of industry professionals and academics including: Shaun Cole (Course Director of MA History and Culture of Fashion); Amy de la Haye (V&A Curator and MA Fashion & Curation tutor); Alison Moloney (Curator); Professor Claire Wilcox (Chair in Fashion Curation, V&A Curator); Professor Judith Clark (Curator and MA Fashion & Curation tutor); and Jane Holt (LCF Archivist) – all of whom are members of LCF’s new Centre for Fashion Curation.

The debate focused on a discussion of the predicaments curators are faced with around the definition of ‘curation’. Amy suggested the word ‘curation’ is used too flippantly, giving the example of someone implying they ‘curate shop windows’. Shaun agreed, explaining that the term ‘curation’ is now being used to define such a variety of things that we’ve previously done for years without thinking about it, meaning we’re always trying to redefine what it involves.

Furthermore, the panel was in agreement over the interesting factors involved in curating and archiving fashion. Amy commented that the unique nature of fashion is seen in the way that we mark our clothes; physically changing them, making them truly our own. Additionally, Jane, while referencing the LCF archive, pointed out that these unique and personal factors in someone’s clothes mean that each individual garment tells an exciting story.

Judith indicated that the role of the curator was also to stage ‘objects’ in a meaningful way, so that the story is available to the viewer:

‘Staging these objects in a way which means the viewer might think differently about that object – or be inspired by that object, it’s about inspiration ideally. The viewer will have a new thought about this object.’

Similarly, Claire explained, the curator needs to be aware of the language used in his or her object descriptions, since the descriptive words used at a certain time reflect the current understanding and appropriation of an object:

‘The language we use in the V&A is very carefully managed, every word is carefully picked and subjectivity is very much avoided. It’s a huge endeavor to treat what we say about objects and what we understand about objects, using our own tongue, for future generations.’

At the end of the discussion, Carol Tulloch had the difficult task of summarising what ‘curation’ means. Carol did so by drawing on some of the shared opinions from the panel, and completed the discussion with this definition:

‘Curating is a space to think, a space of enrichment, enlightenment and, last of all, passion.’

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