Archive for the ‘Research’ category

Research // Grace Adam draws a crowd

big draw setting up

Preparing for The Big Draw. Image © Grace Adam

On Monday 20 October, students, staff and passers-by were treated to an exciting pop-up drawing session in the Typo cafe by LCC lead design tutor Grace Adam as part of Inside Out Festival 2014.

Grace’s event, ‘Framing the Elephant’, invited people to stop, look and draw, taking 10 minutes or half an hour to create a fast, fun drawing of the view from inside the College.

The highlight of #framingtheelephant - a part of #lccgradschool! #nofilter

Instagram @fbigos

A brilliant drawing by @jhartley95 at @lcclondon #framingtheelephant

Instagram @fbigos

Grace has also recently appeared on ‘Daily Brunch with Ocado‘, demonstrating a few fun and unusual ways to get drawing.

Watch the video here [starts 26:59]

Speaking about her wider involvement in ‘The Big Draw’, a national festival of drawing with events held around the country, Grace told presenters Tim Lovejoy and Simon Rimmer:

“The Big Draw was set up to get people re-engaged with drawing, having fun, and connecting to the world in a different way [...] I think it’s considered a childish thing to do, and we communicate with text. Drawing is not taken so seriously, which is a shame. It’s essential.

“I think everybody is obsessed by ‘getting it right’ and getting it to look like the real world, but your drawing will be different from my drawing. You express yourself as an individual and that’s important.

“Drawing is a pleasure, drawing is a way to look at the world, to communicate, to experiment, to explore. It’s a good thing and we’re losing it.”

If you’ve missed out this year, however, some of Grace’s own sculptural work is on show until Friday 31 October in ‘Modes of Remembrance’ at St Giles-in-the-Fields, exploring and responding to the idea of monuments and memorials within the church.

Read Grace Adam’s staff profile

Read more about Research at LCC

The post Research // Grace Adam draws a crowd appeared first on London College of Communication Blog.

Research // Grace Adam draws a crowd

big draw setting up

Preparing for The Big Draw. Image © Grace Adam

On Monday 20 October, students, staff and passers-by were treated to an exciting pop-up drawing session in the Typo cafe by LCC lead design tutor Grace Adam as part of Inside Out Festival 2014.

Grace’s event, ‘Framing the Elephant’, invited people to stop, look and draw, taking 10 minutes or half an hour to create a fast, fun drawing of the view from inside the College.

The highlight of #framingtheelephant - a part of #lccgradschool! #nofilter

Instagram @fbigos

A brilliant drawing by @jhartley95 at @lcclondon #framingtheelephant

Instagram @fbigos

Grace has also recently appeared on ‘Daily Brunch with Ocado‘, demonstrating a few fun and unusual ways to get drawing.

Watch the video here [starts 26:59]

Speaking about her wider involvement in ‘The Big Draw’, a national festival of drawing with events held around the country, Grace told presenters Tim Lovejoy and Simon Rimmer:

“The Big Draw was set up to get people re-engaged with drawing, having fun, and connecting to the world in a different way […} I think it’s considered a childish thing to do, and we communicate with text. Drawing is not taken so seriously, which is a shame. It’s essential.

“I think everybody is obsessed by ‘getting it right’ and getting it to look like the real world, but your drawing will be different from my drawing. You express yourself as an individual and that’s important.

“Drawing is a pleasure, drawing is a way to look at the world, to communicate, to experiment, to explore. It’s a good thing and we’re losing it.”

If you’ve missed out this year, however, some of Grace’s own sculptural work is on show until Friday 31 October in ‘Modes of Remembrance’ at St Giles-in-the-Fields, exploring and responding to the idea of monuments and memorials within the church.

Read Grace Adam’s staff profile

Read more about Research at LCC

The post Research // Grace Adam draws a crowd appeared first on London College of Communication Blog.

Fashioning Professionals Symposium

Gaby Schreiber

A SYMPOSIUM ON THE HISTORICAL AND CONTEMPORARY REPRESENTATION OF CULTURAL AND CREATIVE PROFESSIONS

CALL FOR PAPERS

Research Department, Victoria and Albert Museum, London 27 March 2015

Keynote Speaker: Dr. Agnès Rocamora

The labour market is increasingly made up of those working in the creative professions of fashion, art, design and advertising, but what does it mean to be defined and represented as a ‘creative professional’? From artist to curator; couturier to fashion intern; designer to art director; architect to design student; stylist to blogger; these professional identities can be viewed as social practices, enacted and performed through media, which includes the fashion press, lifestyle magazines, daily news, television, film, and the internet. Here social, cultural and professional identities are co-constructed. These professions and their professionals are both products of, and productive in meanings and values that inform our understanding and knowledge of culture, in both the past and present. They also vary in their representation according to different levels of expertise and career status.

Focusing on the representation of cultural and creative professions, Fashioning Professionals asks the following questions: How have photography and media worked to define and represent creative labour in particular ways? How have individuals represented and defined themselves as professionals in different fields of culture? How do different aspects of cultural identity, such as gender, class and ethnicity, inform these representations? How do different methodologies and disciplinary approaches enrich the study of cultural and creative professions? How can histories and theories of fashion and design contribute to a wider reading and understanding of the professions?

We welcome papers from a range of disciplinary and interdisciplinary perspectives that respond to and reflect upon these questions in relation to the following cultural sectors and their professions:

  • Art
  • Fashion
  • Advertising
  • Design
  • Architecture

Proposals: If you wish to present a paper, please submit a 250 word abstract in Word format to fashioningprofessionals@gmail.com

Abstracts are to include the following information:

  • Author(s)
  • Affiliation(s)
  • Email Address(es)
  • Title of Abstract
  • Body of Abstract

Deadline for Submissions: Monday 5 January 2015
Acceptance Confirmation: Monday 26 January 2015

Please note that there will be a £10 fee for attending the symposium, which will cover lunch, tea and coffees. Registration for the symposium will open in February 2015.

A Digitised Planning System: Scoping Study

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Researchers at Central Saint Martins and the Design Against Crime Research Centre won a Creative Voucher Award to undertake a scoping study on digitised planning systems.

Funded by Creative Works London, this project is the starting phase of a long-term goal to develop and pilot a new digitised planning system for the UK. Geoffrey Makstutis (Course Leader of BA Architecture at CSM) and Mark Simpkins, of the (Design Against Crime Research Centre, UAL) working with the RIBA Policy Unit, are developing a scoping study for the project.

The project aims to provide both a means of allowing architects, designers, planners and developers a way of making use of a range of different types of data to improve the planning process and, crucially, to enable the public to become engaged in the processes that change the built environment – to understand the process, to participate the process and to inform policy at local, regional and national levels.

More info on the Creative Vouchers website.

The post A Digitised Planning System: Scoping Study appeared first on Central Saint Martins: News.

TEXTILE TOOLBOX online exhibition

Textile-Toolbox-online-exhibition.jpg-626x513

The TEXTILE TOOLBOX exhibition launches online on 13th November. It is a showcase of ten propositional design concepts inspired by Mistra research into the sustainability of the fashion and textile industry.

The exhibition platform functions as a research and public engagement 
tool formed around TED’s ‘The TEN’ – design strategies for innovative sustainability thinking and action. The exhibition proposes how these strategies can translate technical and scientific research breakthroughs into design concepts. The new products demonstrate the potential for progressing a sustainable fashion system with new materials, processes, applications and business models. The exhibits are a starting point for discussion – provocations, or ‘provotypes’ – showing us how design tools can create entirely new visions for the future of the industry. This unique online platform offers a global audience a glimpse of a sustainable future fashion industry. An industry that ultimately gives the consumer pleasure whilst also giving the planet and its inhabitants absolute consideration.

The final design pieces use a strategic ‘TEN’ approach to create beautiful fashions for style fans to savour, with aesthetics connecting and responding to the scientific research of the MISTRA Future Fashion consortium.

Exhibits:

1. Seamsdress, by Dr Kate Goldsworthy

2. A.S.A.P (Paper Cloth), by Prof Kay Politowicz, Sandy MacLennan (East Central), Dr Kate Goldsworthy, David Telfer (COS) and Dr Hjalmar Granberg (Innventia)

3. Shanghai Shirt by Prof Becky Earley (Research Profile) and Isabel Dodd

4. Inner/Outer Jacket by Clara Vuletich

5. DeNAture, by Miriam Ribul in collaboration with Hanna de la Motte (SP)

6. ReDressing Activism, by Prof Becky Earley, Emmeline Child and Bridget Harvey

7. Smörgåsbord, by Melanie Bowles (Research Profile) and Kathy Round

8. Sweaver, by Josefin Tissingh

9. Fast Refashion, by Prof Becky Earley

10. A Jumper to Lend, A Jumper to Mend, by Bridget Harvey

Resources:

The collaborations with scientists, academics and professionals, have lead to Tool Kits for action, instructions for making, resources for learning, and films to sit back and watch. International training tools and education models will be available from the site as a free download in the final report in June 2015.

Open Call:

We will also invite a global fashion design audience to submit their own sustainable future fashion projects to us, and selected works will be showcased in an open gallery on the site. We also invite reviewers to send us feedback on the exhibition and to contribute to our final project report. Get in touch for the opportunity to be part of this exciting process.

For more information:

Film // Festival success for LCC staff

72-82#2

Still from ’72-82′, William Raban.

Three members of LCC staff, William Raban, David Knight and Brad Butler, have recently been featured in film festivals around London, balancing their roles as academics and active practitioners.

Professor of Film William Raban had ’72-82′, his latest film, selected by 2014′s London Film Festival (LFF). ’72-82′ explores the first ten years of groundbreaking London arts organisation Acme Studios and their critical work in housing some of the most renowned artists of our time, such as Richard Deacon and Anthony Whishaw.

Despite having more than 50 films under his belt, William describes the making of ’72-82′ as a “completely new experience”, as it solely uses archival visual materials to revisit the formative years of the organisation.

In addition to screenings at the BFI and Acme Studios, the feature-length documentary will also be screened at LCC’s Inside Out Festival, where William is in conversation with acclaimed sculptor, the two-time Turner Prize-nominated Richard Wilson.

David Knight’s work as Senior Lecturer on BA (Hons) Film and Television at LCC has taken him beyond teaching, as he enjoys success as Director of Photography on ‘The Quiet Hour’, which was nominated for Best UK Feature Film at the 22nd Raindance Film Festival.

“It is hugely satisfying to bring my professional practice back to the classroom. Working at features level brings into play a whole new set of skills to disseminate through workshops at LCC,” said David.

Recently appointed LCC Research Fellow Brad Butler continues the trend with a screening of his short film, ‘The Unreliable Narrator, at this year’s LFF.

Read profiles of William Raban, David Knight and Brad Butler

Read about BA (Hons) Film and Television

Read about Brad Butler’s work at the Hayward Gallery

The post Film // Festival success for LCC staff appeared first on London College of Communication Blog.

LCC Research Fellow Brad Butler exhibits at Hayward Gallery

Image: Film still from work by Brad Butler and Karen Mirza

Image: Film still from work by Brad Butler and Karen Mirza

Two films by Brad Butler, a London College of Communication (LCC) Research Fellow, feature in Hayward Gallery exhibition MIRRORCITY, open now until Sunday 4 January 2015.

MIRRORCITY explores the effect the digital revolution has had on our experiences. It includes recent work and new commissions by emerging and established London-based artists who seek to address the challenges, conditions and consequences of living in a digital age.

Brad completed a PhD at LCC under supervisor William Raban and has since become a Post Doctoral Research Fellow at the College.

Brad and his creative partner Karen Mirza have been shortlisted for the sixth Artes Mundi Prize, the UK’s biggest contemporary art prize, and will exhibit with other shortlisted artists in Cardiff from 24 October 2014 until 22 February 2015.

UAL Research caught up with Brad to find out more about his current projects.

Tell us about the work you are showing in MIRRORCITY.

I am showing a new work, ‘Everything for Everyone and Nothing for Us’, alongside an existing work, ‘Hold your Ground’. Shown side by side, these two films speak to each other, though there’s a slight awkwardness about their conversation. They are both about languages of protest, and the relationship of the body to protest.

‘Everything for Everyone and Nothing for Us’ is set in a TV studio, where a protester-in-training listens to audio extracts from a political speech by Margaret Thatcher. Having absorbed the sounds, the protester uses movement to exorcise Thatcher’s voice, retraining the body to resist capitalism.

In ‘Hold Your Ground’, the same protester struggles to turn utterances into speech. Her efforts are interrupted by archive footage of protests in Egypt, Northern Ireland and London. Eventually, she manages to pronounce four phonetic phrases reconstructed from Arabic, meaning ‘hold your ground’, ‘Egyptians’, ‘homeland’ (of the earth, of the Nile) and ‘strike’.

The title of ‘Hold Your Ground’ is taken from the pamphlet How To Protest Intelligently. ‘Everything for Everyone and Nothing for Us’ echoes the slogan of the Mexican Zapatista liberation movement, which began its struggle against neoliberalism, exploitation and racist oppression in 1994.

Why did you choose LCC for your PhD studies, and how did you find the experience?

I chose LCC based on the supervisors primarily. William Raban and Elizabeth Edwards understood my project and process. It was, for me, a perfect match of expertise and timing, and before I knew it I was in the programme supported by LCC’s Research department to find funding.

From there it was a great experience and formative for my work. While academia may not suit every praxis, it proved to be a chance for me to go deeper in a supported semi-autonomous way.

The links later on to a post-doctorate have felt natural. So far I have been encouraged and I feel I fit. Basically, over the last 19 years of being an artist I have worked out the hard way how important it is to work with the right people. Even great ideas will become exhausting if that is not a priority.

Brad Butler talks about his research at LCC's Graduate School Festival, May 2014. Image © Lewis Bush.

Brad Butler talks about his research at LCC’s Graduate School Festival, May 2014. Image © Lewis Bush.

Read the original interview in full on the UAL Research pages

Read Brad’s Research profile

Read more about Research at LCC

The post LCC Research Fellow Brad Butler exhibits at Hayward Gallery appeared first on London College of Communication Blog.

Brad Butler, LCC researcher, exhibiting at the Hayward Gallery

Brad Butler

Image: Film still from work by Brad Butler and Karen Mirza 

Two films by Brad Butler, a researcher at London College of Communication (LCC) will be featured in a new exhibition at the Hayward Gallery, called MIRRORCITY from 14 October 2014 to  4 January 2015.

MIRRORCITY explores the effect the digital revolution has had on our experiences. It shows recent work and new commissions by key emerging and established artists working in the capital today, who seek to address the challenges, conditions and consequences of living in a digital age.

A specially produced ‘alternative’ newspaper has been created by Tom McCarthy for MIRRORCITY. The project was conceived as a collaboration between the author and the artists featured in the exhibition. Artists have contributed a diverse and distinctive array of texts and pictures that McCarthy has edited into an otherworldly reading experience.

Brad completed a PhD at LCC with William Raban as his supervisor and has since become a Post Doctoral Research Fellow at the College. Brad along with his creative partner, Karen Mirza have been shortlisted for sixth Artes Mundi Prize, the UK’s biggest Contemporary Art Prize and will be exhibiting in Cardiff from 24 October 2014 and 22nd February 2015. 

Tell us what work you are including in the show, and why did you choose this work?

I am showing a new work, Everything for Everyone and Nothing for Us alongside an existing work, Hold your Ground. Shown side by side, these two films speak to each other, though there’s a slight awkwardness about their conversation. They are both about languages of protest, and the relationship of the body to protest. Everything for Everyone and Nothing for Us is set in a TV studio, where a protester-in-training listens to audio extracts from a political speech by Margaret Thatcher. Having absorbed the sounds, the protester uses movement to exorcise Thatcher’s voice, retraining the body to resist capitalism.

In Hold Your Ground the same protester struggles to turn utterances into speech. Her efforts are interrupted by archive footage of protests in Egypt, Northern Ireland and London. Eventually, she manages to pronounce four phonetic phrases reconstructed from Arabic, meaning ‘hold your ground’, ‘Egyptians’, ‘homeland’ (of the earth, of the Nile) and ‘strike’.

The title of Hold Your Ground is taken from the pamphlet How To Protest Intelligently. Everything for Everyone and Nothing for Us echoes the slogan of the Mexican Zapatista liberation movement, which began its struggle against neoliberalism, exploitation and racist oppression in 1994.

Were you approached by Tom McCarthy and what has it been like working with him?

There is a newspaper edited by Tom accompanying the Hayward Show with work submitted by  all the participants in the exhibition. Tom has then cross edited and retitled the submitted text, pictures or provocations to create something new. Somehow no one has complained, and he has made something more than the sum of its parts. An early draft I saw was very funny.

Why did you choose to study your PhD at LCC? Was it a good experience?

I chose LCC based on the supervisors primarily. William Raban and Elizabeth Edwards understood my project and process. It was, for me, a perfect match of expertise and timing, and before I knew it I was in the programme supported by LCC research department to find funding. From there it was a great experience and formative for my work, while academia may not suit every praxis, it proved to be a chance for me to go deeper in a supported semi autonomous way.

The links later onto a post doctorate have felt natural. So far I have been encouraged and I feel I fit. Basically over the last 19 years of being an artist I have worked out the hard way how important it is to work with the right people. Even great ideas will become exhausting if that is not a priority.

Part of the #inspiringresearch series

Charlotte Hodes, Professor in Fine Art, LCF joins the Jerwood Drawing Prize Panel discussion

Hodes won the Jerwood Drawing Prize in 2006 and had a drawing  selected for the Jerwood Drawing Prize 2014. The exhibtion includes 51 drawings by 46 practitioners selected from 3,234 submitted works.  The selectors for the Jerwood Drawing Prize 2014 were:

  • Gavin Delahunty, Senior Curator of Contemporary Art, Dallas Museum
  • 
Dr Janet McKenzie, Author and Co-editor of Studio International
  • Alison Wilding RA, Artist

The  panel discussion is chaired by Paul Thomas with
 Charlotte Hodes (Artist), Janet McKenzie (Selector)
 and Anita Taylor (Director of the Jerwood Drawing Prize).

Monday 13 October 2014, 6.30pm – 8pm

This is a free event but booking is advised. Book here

The exhibition runs from 17 September to 23 October 2014. 17 SEPTEMBER – 26 OCTOBER 2014

Lara Torres, LCF PhD student, exhibiting at ‘The Future of Fashion is Now’ in Rotterdam

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The Future of Fashion is Now 

Exhibition
11 October 2014 – 18 January 2015
Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen, Rotterdam

The fashion artist and practice based researcher at the London College of Fashion Lara Torres is taking part this autumn exhibition at the Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen with her video installation ‘An impossible wardrobe for the invisible’ (2011).This project goes beyond the boundaries of fashion design to rethink the designer’s task and open a discussion about the importance of clothing and the transience of fashion and it is based in the creation of temporary clothes that are produced with the aim of being destroyed; leaving only the ‘memory’ of the pieces in video documentation relating to the ephemeral nature of fashion, also as a metaphor for the quickness of the fashion system today.

The exhibition ‘The future of fashion is now’ presents the future of fashion. A garment that reacts to emotions, lace patterns grown from a plant, fabric that breaks off and fashion that literally zips people together. Taking a critical view of the current fashion system, more than fifty international designers are showing innovative work at the cutting edge of fashion and art. With the latest generation of fashion designers from all over the world and renowned innovators like Viktor&Rolf, Martin Margiela, Hussein Chalayan and Iris van Herpen.

Lara_Torres_2011_An_impossible_wardrobe_stills_01 Lara_Torres_2011_An_impossible_wardrobe_stills_06